If you were to get a Scion FR-S, would you Buy or Lease? When would you get a 2013 knowing...

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Old 29 May 2013, 07:10 pm   #1 (permalink)
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Default If you were to get a Scion FR-S, would you Buy or Lease? When would you get a 2013 knowing...

...2014 is coming soon? If you were to get a Scion FR-S, would you Buy or Lease? I have heard some speculation that this ca will hold its value very well. Is this true? Would it make sense paying the extra ~ $12,000 to own it? What do you think? If so, Apparently The 2014 model is to come out late August to september, would the prices change at all if any? Which time of this year would you to get a 2013? or would it be best to get a 2014? This car would be for a responsible 17 year old teen who has good driving experience and isn't one of those other scumbags who drive recklessly.
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Old 29 May 2013, 07:24 pm   #2 (permalink)
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Leasing makes sense if you are the type of person who would want to change cars every 2-3 years. If you get bored easily, then this is the way to go. But keep in mind, that leasing is just like renting the car. You are only paying for the time (& mileage) you have the car, but at the same time you are responsible for maintaing it. If at the end of the lease and the car has damages on it, you'll have to get it fixed before you return it, or they will charge you for them to get it fixed.































You dont own it, and there are limitations on how many miles you can drive it, when you return it with excess miles, you'll have to pay for it. There are also restrictions on modifications on the car when you lease. Every contract is different. Usually a lease would require a down payment to start, then a monthly for 2-3 years. If you add this up, you probably paid almost half of the car already.































When you buy, you pay the whole price of the car (its not extra), but its yours to keep. No mileage limitations, no mods or upgrade restrictions, it is your property.































I bought my first brand new car in 2000, paid it off in 4 years, still drives great and enjoying no car payments for 9 years and counting. I plan to keep it until it falls apart. But that's just my opinion.































If you trust the brand (reliabilty and dependability) of the car, then it safe to buy it. If you just like to try something new and doubt that the car will not last, then just lease it.































Scion is still a new company, but their parent company and engines are made by Toyota, which is pretty reliable in my opinion.































The price difference for a 2013 vs 2014 will not be that much. Every dealer would have different promotions. That will depend on the availability of such models, and you might not have much selection on the 2013 models.































I would take a close look of what the difference of the 2013 vs 2014 on specs, like horsepower, torque, cosmetics etc.
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Old 29 May 2013, 07:39 pm   #3 (permalink)
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I would not recommend this vehicle for any teenager for this is a moderately high performance car even with just a 200 horsepower engine. By the very nature as to human development, no teen ager is responsible. Their brains are not developed yet and shall not be for several years. It would take a teen ager that has extensive experience in driving in competition since much younger ages in go-karts, performance karts or even has extensive training on performance tracks. Go to "wreckedexotics. com" to see photographic evidence of people with enough money to buy high performance cars but zero brains as to getting proper training. No matter the car, the horsepower, the name plate, etc., there is only four small areas of contact between the vehicle and Mother Earth, the tire contact patch. These are about the size of a man's hand of the large size. THIS is the limiting factor in all cars. The frictional levels of these patches are what a driver manages, most of us without any awareness as to the limits, when driving a car. That explains the rise in crashes after rain or snow or fog changes the frictional levels on a roadway surface. No matter you last sentence, we all need current and often driving courses to remind us of the limitations as to driving. OK? Nice car but not for a teen. Teens manage to crash at any level about one million times each year. Over 5,000 die and hundreds of thousands manage to get injured. All from driving a car as a driver, passenger of even as a pedestrian. Facts. Reality. It can be crushing. No FR-S. Sorry.
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