timing belt

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Old 21 Jan 2010, 11:40 am   #1 (permalink)
badgolferman
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Default timing belt

1997 Camry 4 cylinder LE Automatic 180K miles

Yes, the time has come for the 60K mile timing belt replacement. The
last two times I had the belt replaced the Toyota dealer told me the
water pump is fine and left it in. After 180K miles I am beginning to
think it should be replaced also. The Toyota dealer quoted over $700
for these two procedures. To be fair they also included some other
seals and rings in that area.

Apparently Toyota recommends 60K mile timing belt replacements on 1998
and below vehicles and 90K mile replacement intervals on 1999 and above
vehicles. Why? Aren't the same belts and materials used between a 98
and 99?

I am seriously considering just taking it to a local garage for the
work. Their quote was under $500 but I'm not sure yet if that included
all the seals and rings that get replaced. If I buy the parts from the
dealer it is around $275. How much inferior would the parts be that a
local garage would use?
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Old 21 Jan 2010, 12:23 pm   #2 (permalink)
FatterDumber& Happier Moe
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Default Re: timing belt

badgolferman wrote:
> 1997 Camry 4 cylinder LE Automatic 180K miles
>
> Yes, the time has come for the 60K mile timing belt replacement. The
> last two times I had the belt replaced the Toyota dealer told me the
> water pump is fine and left it in. After 180K miles I am beginning to
> think it should be replaced also. The Toyota dealer quoted over $700
> for these two procedures. To be fair they also included some other
> seals and rings in that area.
>
> Apparently Toyota recommends 60K mile timing belt replacements on 1998
> and below vehicles and 90K mile replacement intervals on 1999 and above
> vehicles. Why? Aren't the same belts and materials used between a 98
> and 99?
>
> I am seriously considering just taking it to a local garage for the
> work. Their quote was under $500 but I'm not sure yet if that included
> all the seals and rings that get replaced. If I buy the parts from the
> dealer it is around $275. How much inferior would the parts be that a
> local garage would use?


A car question in a political newsgroup? What's this world coming to?
My 2 cents,
Depending on the how critical the use of the car is, do you use it for
doctor appointments in a far away city, are you expecting a heart attack
or stroke, is it the primary vehicle,... etc. I'd go 90K and at 180K I'd
be changing the water pump. If the independent garage doesn't mind I'd
look on e-bay for one of those timing belt kits. Which is what I did
when I changed mine. I wound up changing only the belt in my case at
93K miles on a 98 Toyota, because everything was dry inside the timing
cover, oil seals were still good and water pump was OK and it wasn't
that big a job. At 180K if I still have the car I'll change the seals
and water pump and belt. One of the questions I'd have for any mechanic
that works on it is, how do you torque the crankshaft bolt when you
tighten it?
It's not a hard job really but things need to be done correctly or it
could leave you stranded.
There are a lot of parts to worry about and a lot of things that
might need attention, such as,
Thermostat, all the belts, antifreeze, hoses, probably time for spark
plugs, change the brake fluid and automatic transmission fluid and a
dozen, maybe a hundred other things. Old cars need a lot of tender love
and care.
I think this is what I got, and I wound up using only the timing
belt.....
http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/Timin...Q5fAccessories
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Old 21 Jan 2010, 12:38 pm   #3 (permalink)
ron
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Default Re: timing belt

I haven't had a timing belt done but a few years ago did a complete 60K
service on my 02 Highlander (inc front pads). I found a factory trained
independent Toyota mechanic that used ALL Toyota factory parts and he was
just damned near half of what the dealer wanted, and the dealer brought the
parts while I was there!

So I'd suggest looking for one.

Ron


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Old 21 Jan 2010, 01:48 pm   #4 (permalink)
Ray O
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Default Re: timing belt


"badgolferman" <REMOVETHISbadgolferman@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:xn0gpen0ochbsz001@reader.albasani.net...
> 1997 Camry 4 cylinder LE Automatic 180K miles
>
> Yes, the time has come for the 60K mile timing belt replacement. The
> last two times I had the belt replaced the Toyota dealer told me the
> water pump is fine and left it in. After 180K miles I am beginning to
> think it should be replaced also. The Toyota dealer quoted over $700
> for these two procedures. To be fair they also included some other
> seals and rings in that area.
>
> Apparently Toyota recommends 60K mile timing belt replacements on 1998
> and below vehicles and 90K mile replacement intervals on 1999 and above
> vehicles. Why? Aren't the same belts and materials used between a 98
> and 99?
>
> I am seriously considering just taking it to a local garage for the
> work. Their quote was under $500 but I'm not sure yet if that included
> all the seals and rings that get replaced. If I buy the parts from the
> dealer it is around $275. How much inferior would the parts be that a
> local garage would use?


Timing belts on Toyotas rarely break before 90k miles, and I believe that
the engine on yours is freewheeling so while a broken belt will leave you
stranded, it shouldn't damage the engine.

If the water pump is original, I'd consider replacing it. Whether or not
you replace the camshaft and crankshaft seals depends on what their
condition is. If they appear to be dry, I'd leave them alone.

The quality of the parts that independent shops use varies widely. Some use
OEM parts, some use quality aftermarket parts, and some use the cheapest
stuff they can find. My preference is for OEM because you know what you are
getting.
--

Ray O
(correct punctuation to reply)


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Old 21 Jan 2010, 03:07 pm   #5 (permalink)
spsffan
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Default Re: timing belt

ron wrote:
> I haven't had a timing belt done but a few years ago did a complete 60K
> service on my 02 Highlander (inc front pads). I found a factory trained
> independent Toyota mechanic that used ALL Toyota factory parts and he
> was just damned near half of what the dealer wanted, and the dealer
> brought the parts while I was there!
>
> So I'd suggest looking for one.
>
> Ron
>
> --- news://freenews.netfront.net/ - complaints: news@netfront.net ---



Good advise! Many independent specialists are both lower priced and
perform higher quality work overall that you can get at a typical
dealer. Of course, some don't. Look for one that has been around a long
time and where the shop is always busy.

But I always wonder about the term "factory trained" for an automobile
mechanic. I see this all the time, and it just doesn't make sense.

It seems to me that those who work in automobile factories just slap the
same parts in the same place all day long, day in, day out, and don't
have or need any particular knowledge beyond how to do that.
Furthermore, what particular know how would one get from dealing with
brand new cars fresh off the assembly line? What the world needs is
mechanics that can fix and maintain cars that have seen actual road
service.

This is not to say that the manufacturers don't indeed have mechanic
schools, and I'm pretty sure that most do. But that isn't the factory.
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Old 21 Jan 2010, 03:40 pm   #6 (permalink)
ransley
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Default Re: timing belt

On Jan 21, 11:40*am, "badgolferman" <REMOVETHISbadgolfer...@gmail.com>
wrote:
> 1997 Camry 4 cylinder LE Automatic 180K miles
>
> Yes, the time has come for the 60K mile timing belt replacement. *The
> last two times I had the belt replaced the Toyota dealer told me the
> water pump is fine and left it in. *After 180K miles I am beginning to
> think it should be replaced also. *The Toyota dealer quoted over $700
> for these two procedures. *To be fair they also included some other
> seals and rings in that area.
>
> Apparently Toyota recommends 60K mile timing belt replacements on 1998
> and below vehicles and 90K mile replacement intervals on 1999 and above
> vehicles. *Why? *Aren't the same belts and materials used between a 98
> and 99?
>
> I am seriously considering just taking it to a local garage for the
> work. *Their quote was under $500 but I'm not sure yet if that included
> all the seals and rings that get replaced. *If I buy the parts from the
> dealer it is around $275. *How much inferior would the parts be that a
> local garage would use?


700 is way to much, dealers often do specials on timing belts and
pumps, even 500 is high, shop around
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Old 21 Jan 2010, 05:28 pm   #7 (permalink)
Ralph Mowery
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Default Re: timing belt


"badgolferman" <REMOVETHISbadgolferman@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:xn0gpen0ochbsz001@reader.albasani.net...
> 1997 Camry 4 cylinder LE Automatic 180K miles
>
> Yes, the time has come for the 60K mile timing belt replacement. The
> last two times I had the belt replaced the Toyota dealer told me the
> water pump is fine and left it in. After 180K miles I am beginning to
> think it should be replaced also. The Toyota dealer quoted over $700
> for these two procedures. To be fair they also included some other
> seals and rings in that area.
>
> Apparently Toyota recommends 60K mile timing belt replacements on 1998
> and below vehicles and 90K mile replacement intervals on 1999 and above
> vehicles. Why? Aren't the same belts and materials used between a 98
> and 99?
>
> I am seriously considering just taking it to a local garage for the
> work. Their quote was under $500 but I'm not sure yet if that included
> all the seals and rings that get replaced. If I buy the parts from the
> dealer it is around $275. How much inferior would the parts be that a
> local garage would use?


When I had a 91 Camry my independant garage would only use OEM toyota parts.
He seemed to do good work at a good price. I had the water pump replaced as
the labor was 'free' with the belt change. I usually had the hoses and
other minor things changed at the same time. Again 'free' labor as the old
parts were already taken off and would have been put back on.
It may cost a few more dollars, but worth it for piece of mind.


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Old 21 Jan 2010, 07:31 pm   #8 (permalink)
nm5k@wt.net
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Default Re: timing belt

On Jan 21, 12:23*pm, FatterDumber& Happier Moe
<"WheresMyCheck"@UncleSamLoves.Mee> wrote:
*One of the questions I'd have for any mechanic
> that works on it is, how do you torque the crankshaft bolt when you
> tighten it?


I use an impact wrench. I've tried torquing them with normal
torque wrenches, but it's hard to keep the engine from turning.
So I get them as tight as I can with a torque wrench, and then
I give them a blip with the impact. If you are used to the impact,
you can get close enough for gov work. Just a quick blip
will do the trick.
When removing the nut, I usually use the starter motor to
knock it loose if no impact wrench is around.
I don't have an impact here. The last one I did I got it as
tight as I could, and then drove it around the block to a
guy who had an impact wrench in his garage. :/




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Old 21 Jan 2010, 08:11 pm   #9 (permalink)
in2dadark
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Default Re: timing belt

On Jan 21, 4:40*pm, ransley <Mark_Rans...@Yahoo.com> wrote:
> On Jan 21, 11:40*am, "badgolferman" <REMOVETHISbadgolfer...@gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > 1997 Camry 4 cylinder LE Automatic 180K miles

>
> > Yes, the time has come for the 60K mile timing belt replacement. *The
> > last two times I had the belt replaced the Toyota dealer told me the
> > water pump is fine and left it in. *After 180K miles I am beginning to
> > think it should be replaced also. *The Toyota dealer quoted over $700
> > for these two procedures. *To be fair they also included some other
> > seals and rings in that area.

>
> > Apparently Toyota recommends 60K mile timing belt replacements on 1998
> > and below vehicles and 90K mile replacement intervals on 1999 and above
> > vehicles. *Why? *Aren't the same belts and materials used between a98
> > and 99?

>
> > I am seriously considering just taking it to a local garage for the
> > work. *Their quote was under $500 but I'm not sure yet if that included
> > all the seals and rings that get replaced. *If I buy the parts from the
> > dealer it is around $275. *How much inferior would the parts be that a
> > local garage would use?

>
> 700 is way to much, dealers often do specials on timing belts and
> pumps, even 500 is high, shop around- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -


I paid 4 and change for both last time at a dealer. But that was 70k
miles ago. I'd say 5 is ok. And I guess it would depend on what seals
are being replaced.
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Old 21 Jan 2010, 08:18 pm   #10 (permalink)
in2dadark
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Default Re: timing belt

On Jan 21, 4:07*pm, spsffan <spsf...@hotmail.com> wrote:
> ron wrote:
> > I haven't had a timing belt done but a few years ago did a complete 60K
> > service on my 02 Highlander (inc front pads). *I found a factory trained
> > independent Toyota mechanic that used ALL Toyota factory parts and he
> > was just damned near half of what the dealer wanted, and the dealer
> > brought the parts while I was there!

>
> > So I'd suggest looking for one.

>
> > Ron

>
> > --- news://freenews.netfront.net/ - complaints: n...@netfront.net ---

>
> Good advise! Many independent specialists are both lower priced and
> perform higher quality work overall that you can get at a typical
> dealer. Of course, some don't. Look for one that has been around a long
> time and where the shop is always busy.
>
> But I always wonder about the term "factory trained" for an automobile
> mechanic. I see this all the time, and it just doesn't make sense.
>
> It seems to me that those who work in automobile factories just slap the
> same parts in the same place all day long, day in, day out, and don't
> have or need any particular knowledge beyond how to do that.
> Furthermore, what particular know how would one get from dealing with
> brand new cars fresh off the assembly line? What the world needs is
> mechanics that can fix and maintain cars that have seen actual road
> service.
>
> This is not to say that the manufacturers don't indeed have mechanic
> schools, and I'm pretty sure that most do. But that isn't the factory.


Factory trained means they either went to an off site location or had
on site training from toyota. It doesn't mean they went to the factory
to build cars. They aren't mechanics now. Automobiles require
'Technicians' now.ie.. Ray O...

i was an ASE certified Tech. Which I'm certain Ray O is. I also have
an associates degree in the automotive field. I can tell you with all
my training there were techs who could wrench circles around me at
many dealerships. Competition is high to get those 'flat rate' jobs
and they are VERY good at what they do. And they have a great deal of
pride in and love for their work..
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