Re: 1987 Camry - fan does not work at lowest speed

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Old 07 Oct 2004, 12:40 pm   #1 (permalink)
gtp99red
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Default Re: 1987 Camry - fan does not work at lowest speed

I found this in another posting - a link that results in the following
instructions on how to fix the expensive resistor pack for $3. I haven't
tried it yet on my '90. Not sure if the '87 has the same pack but suspect
it does. Here's the info:
A thoughtful fellow posted this here a while back. As someone below noted,
the problem is in the resistors. (The blower works, so that's *not* the
problem.) See, the power goes through anywhere from one to three resistor
coils, depending on how the button is set. Lower speed, more resistors to
lower the power going to the blower.

If you look at the pack from left to right, and call them resistors 1, 2,
and 3, then current goes thru 1 only for the next to highest speed, 1 and
2 for the next to lowest speed, and all 3 for the LO speed.

When the #3 goes bad, it makes LO inoperable. It also appears to be the
smallest and most fragile of the 3 resistors.

You can pay Toyota a bag of money for a "resistor pack," which on a '90 is
under the passenger dash as mentioned below and costs something like $65.
Or, if you have a soldering iron and a little patience, you can replace
the bad resistors yourself. I had to do this twice.

First, order two resistors from www.radioshack.com part #90-903. Then pull
the resistor pack out and figure out which are the #1 and #2 resistors. If
you have a digital multi-meter (get the pocket one from Radio Shack if you
don't), this is easy; add up the resistance until you see how the current
flows. Otherwise, you'll have to use logic. Anyway, unsolder the two bad
resistors and solder the Radio Shack ones in.

Presto. You have low-speed fans again, for about $3 worth of parts, and
now you own a useful digital multi-meter, too.

If you want stay as close to factory settings as possible with the
resistors, the factory Camry electrical wiring manual lists the resistors
as 0.4, 0.8, and 1.5 ohm for 1-3 respectively.

I'm going to try it and get back to you all.

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Old 24 Oct 2004, 01:57 am   #2 (permalink)
John
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Default Re: 1987 Camry - fan does not work at lowest speed

I bought a small coil spring from a hardware place and replaced the low
speed resistor with a part of that. A bit off fiddling/testing was needed
but it has worked satisfactorily for years now. Mine was on a 1988 Camry.
John
"gtp99red" <gtp99red@juno.com> wrote in message
news:57d473bdcbb3f1402d6d1915c4e4ddc8@localhost.ta lkaboutautos.com...
>I found this in another posting - a link that results in the following
> instructions on how to fix the expensive resistor pack for $3. I haven't
> tried it yet on my '90. Not sure if the '87 has the same pack but suspect
> it does. Here's the info:
> A thoughtful fellow posted this here a while back. As someone below noted,
> the problem is in the resistors. (The blower works, so that's *not* the
> problem.) See, the power goes through anywhere from one to three resistor
> coils, depending on how the button is set. Lower speed, more resistors to
> lower the power going to the blower.
>
> If you look at the pack from left to right, and call them resistors 1, 2,
> and 3, then current goes thru 1 only for the next to highest speed, 1 and
> 2 for the next to lowest speed, and all 3 for the LO speed.
>
> When the #3 goes bad, it makes LO inoperable. It also appears to be the
> smallest and most fragile of the 3 resistors.
>
> You can pay Toyota a bag of money for a "resistor pack," which on a '90 is
> under the passenger dash as mentioned below and costs something like $65.
> Or, if you have a soldering iron and a little patience, you can replace
> the bad resistors yourself. I had to do this twice.
>
> First, order two resistors from www.radioshack.com part #90-903. Then pull
> the resistor pack out and figure out which are the #1 and #2 resistors. If
> you have a digital multi-meter (get the pocket one from Radio Shack if you
> don't), this is easy; add up the resistance until you see how the current
> flows. Otherwise, you'll have to use logic. Anyway, unsolder the two bad
> resistors and solder the Radio Shack ones in.
>
> Presto. You have low-speed fans again, for about $3 worth of parts, and
> now you own a useful digital multi-meter, too.
>
> If you want stay as close to factory settings as possible with the
> resistors, the factory Camry electrical wiring manual lists the resistors
> as 0.4, 0.8, and 1.5 ohm for 1-3 respectively.
>
> I'm going to try it and get back to you all.
>



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