Camry auto_tranny shifting <?>

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Old 23 Feb 2005, 09:30 pm   #1 (permalink)
0_Qed
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Default Camry auto_tranny shifting <?>

Readership,

I'm a neebie to the Camry line ,
just aquired a well cared for '94' ,
need to know if the Over_drive button on the auto_trany shifter
can be engaged/dis_engaged while the vehicle is under 'way' ???

Or ,
"stop" , then engage/disengage.

Thanks for any replies ... flame.
:-)
Ed.
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Old 23 Feb 2005, 10:57 pm   #2 (permalink)
Philip
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Default Re: Camry auto_tranny shifting <?>

0_Qed wrote:
> Readership,
>
> I'm a neebie to the Camry line ,
> just aquired a well cared for '94' ,
> need to know if the Over_drive button on the auto_trany shifter
> can be engaged/dis_engaged while the vehicle is under 'way' ???
>
> Or ,
> "stop" , then engage/disengage.
>
> Thanks for any replies ... flame.
> :-)
> Ed.


The Owner's Manual explains the "Overdrive" button. The OD button prevents
OD from being engaged. It's a "blocker" selector. If you are already in
OD, pressing the button once will force a downshift to 3rd gear until you
press the button again.
--

- Philip



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Old 24 Feb 2005, 09:41 am   #3 (permalink)
m Ransley
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Default Re: Camry auto_tranny shifting <?>

You can disengage it moving but I just leave it on for normal driving.
It will not even actuate till motor temp is 110 or 120f .

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Old 24 Feb 2005, 11:10 am   #4 (permalink)
JerseyMike
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Default Re: Camry auto_tranny shifting <?>


"0_Qed" <nano.bot@shaysnet.com> wrote in message
news:421D4A3E.66C0@shaysnet.com...
> Readership,
>
> I'm a neebie to the Camry line ,
> just aquired a well cared for '94' ,
> need to know if the Over_drive button on the auto_trany shifter
> can be engaged/dis_engaged while the vehicle is under 'way' ???
>
> Or ,
> "stop" , then engage/disengage.
>
> Thanks for any replies ... flame.
> :-)
> Ed.


i have a '99 w/140k on it and i usually disengage it when i'm driving around
town up to speeds 40-45 mph. if i'm on a road that is posted 40mph and
higher i engage the O/D. i do the same w/ the '02 i picked up last month
and it drives real well and the rpm's don't get too high either. it can be
engaged/disengaged at any time, i've even used it for high speed engine
braking, like when you almost miss an exit ramp and need to slow quickly and
and don't want to just rely on your brakes to get ya there.

mike..........


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Old 25 Feb 2005, 07:18 am   #5 (permalink)
Daniel
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Default Re: Camry auto_tranny shifting <?>

i've even used it for high speed engine
braking, like when you almost miss an exit ramp and need to slow
quickly and
and don't want to just rely on your brakes to get ya there.
--------
Remembering, brake pads cost less than transmissions, which would you
rather wear out first?
------------
Once had a BMW motorcycle (R75/5). I was in college, and BMW had a
reputation for long term durability with all gear and driveshaft power
train - no chains. I used to like to downshift and use engine braking
like you're describing. Worked great and was fun, too.
One evening, in the dark and cold by a long deserted stretch along the
coast, somewhere near Oceanside, CA, cruising down the freeway, I lost
power and was stranded by the side of the road.
Even though I'd been downshifting smoothly, turns out the extra
pressure had stripped out the splines in the clutch disk.

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Old 25 Feb 2005, 09:53 am   #6 (permalink)
Philip
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Default Re: Camry auto_tranny shifting <?>

Daniel wrote:
> ------------
> Once had a BMW motorcycle (R75/5). I was in college, and BMW had a
> reputation for long term durability with all gear and driveshaft power
> train - no chains. I used to like to downshift and use engine braking
> like you're describing. Worked great and was fun, too.
> One evening, in the dark and cold by a long deserted stretch along the
> coast, somewhere near Oceanside, CA, cruising down the freeway, I lost
> power and was stranded by the side of the road.
> Even though I'd been downshifting smoothly, turns out the extra
> pressure had stripped out the splines in the clutch disk.


Downshifting was NOT responsible for the stripped splines. That you
happened to experience spline failure at that particular moment is
coincidental. What you failed to do was follow BMW's maintenance schedule
of separating the transmission from the engine enough to dap some of that
exotic Schaburag grease on those ittie bittie splines. The service interval
was something like yearly or 20k miles. You pays a little at a time or you
pay a one lump sum later.
--

- Philip



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Old 26 Feb 2005, 10:51 am   #7 (permalink)
JerseyMike
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Default Re: Camry auto_tranny shifting <?>


"Daniel" <nospampls2002@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1109337527.103249.58300@g14g2000cwa.googlegro ups.com...
> i've even used it for high speed engine
> braking, like when you almost miss an exit ramp and need to slow
> quickly and
> and don't want to just rely on your brakes to get ya there.
> --------
> Remembering, brake pads cost less than transmissions, which would you
> rather wear out first?
> ------------



if i did it all the time and abused the tranny, then i'd be worried, but
being able to use that on/off for the OD comes in real handy even manuvering
on the highway or interstates when necessary. the difference is knowing
when you can downshift and when you shouldn't downshift.

mike.............



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Old 27 Feb 2005, 09:41 am   #8 (permalink)
Jason James
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Default Re: Camry auto_tranny shifting <?>


"Daniel" <nospampls2002@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1109337527.103249.58300@g14g2000cwa.googlegro ups.com...
> i've even used it for high speed engine
> braking, like when you almost miss an exit ramp and need to slow
> quickly and
> and don't want to just rely on your brakes to get ya there.
> --------
> Remembering, brake pads cost less than transmissions, which would you
> rather wear out first?
> ------------
> Once had a BMW motorcycle (R75/5). I was in college, and BMW had a
> reputation for long term durability with all gear and driveshaft power
> train - no chains. I used to like to downshift and use engine braking
> like you're describing. Worked great and was fun, too.
> One evening, in the dark and cold by a long deserted stretch along the
> coast, somewhere near Oceanside, CA, cruising down the freeway, I lost
> power and was stranded by the side of the road.
> Even though I'd been downshifting smoothly, turns out the extra
> pressure had stripped out the splines in the clutch disk.



There is a world of difference between pulling an automatic back thru the
gears (or just one gear) and performing rev-matched downshifts with a manual
transmission. In the first instance you are forcing the bands and clutches
to work, while in the manual, clutch slippage is minimal if done correctly
( double declutch).

It's interesting from a learner's point of view also. Here in Australia,
learner drivers are taught to downshift in manual transmission vehicles, for
engine assisted braking as well as using the brake-pedal. Its improves
stability and sets the car up in the right gear for exiting the situation.

I agree with your reluctance to punish the automatic.

In the case of the bike, that drive-shaft spline stripping is a design
weakness. There are numerous splines in a FWD car which work happily in both
direction of drive or torque.

Jason


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Old 27 Feb 2005, 09:58 am   #9 (permalink)
Philip
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Default Re: Camry auto_tranny shifting <?>

Jason James wrote:
> "Daniel" <nospampls2002@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:1109337527.103249.58300@g14g2000cwa.googlegro ups.com...
>> i've even used it for high speed engine
>> braking, like when you almost miss an exit ramp and need to slow
>> quickly and
>> and don't want to just rely on your brakes to get ya there.
>> --------
>> Remembering, brake pads cost less than transmissions, which would you
>> rather wear out first?
>> ------------
>> Once had a BMW motorcycle (R75/5). I was in college, and BMW had a
>> reputation for long term durability with all gear and driveshaft
>> power train - no chains. I used to like to downshift and use engine
>> braking
>> like you're describing. Worked great and was fun, too.
>> One evening, in the dark and cold by a long deserted stretch along
>> the coast, somewhere near Oceanside, CA, cruising down the freeway,
>> I lost power and was stranded by the side of the road.
>> Even though I'd been downshifting smoothly, turns out the extra
>> pressure had stripped out the splines in the clutch disk.

>
>
> There is a world of difference between pulling an automatic back thru
> the gears (or just one gear) and performing rev-matched downshifts
> with a manual transmission. In the first instance you are forcing the
> bands and clutches to work, while in the manual, clutch slippage is
> minimal if done correctly ( double declutch).
>
> It's interesting from a learner's point of view also. Here in
> Australia, learner drivers are taught to downshift in manual
> transmission vehicles, for engine assisted braking as well as using
> the brake-pedal. Its improves stability and sets the car up in the
> right gear for exiting the situation.
>
> I agree with your reluctance to punish the automatic.
>
> In the case of the bike, that drive-shaft spline stripping is a design
> weakness. There are numerous splines in a FWD car which work happily
> in both direction of drive or torque.
>
> Jason


Jason. The BMW K series would strip the transmission input splines if they
were not periodically lubricated as mentioned in the BMW Tech bulletins.
There were 22 spline "teeth" instead of the typcial 8 (BMW's explanation was
dubious to me at the time). The splines on K-series final drive pinion
shaft (without ParaLever)were not known for stripping at all.

Jason, in the case of FWD cars, the multi ball CV joints not only operate at
an angle as necessary, they ALSO have some linear travel capability just
like a slip yoke (on splines). So the only splines that are present in
automatics is to facilitate locking a shaft to a hub and securing it with a
circlip or locknut.
--

- Philip
--

- Philip



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Old 27 Feb 2005, 05:19 pm   #10 (permalink)
Jason James
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Default Re: Camry auto_tranny shifting <?>


"Philip" <1chip-state1@earthlink.n0t> wrote in message
news:O6mUd.8508$Ba3.2962@newsread2.news.atl.earthl ink.net...
> Jason James wrote:
> > "Daniel" <nospampls2002@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> > news:1109337527.103249.58300@g14g2000cwa.googlegro ups.com...
> >> i've even used it for high speed engine
> >> braking, like when you almost miss an exit ramp and need to slow
> >> quickly and
> >> and don't want to just rely on your brakes to get ya there.
> >> --------
> >> Remembering, brake pads cost less than transmissions, which would you
> >> rather wear out first?
> >> ------------
> >> Once had a BMW motorcycle (R75/5). I was in college, and BMW had a
> >> reputation for long term durability with all gear and driveshaft
> >> power train - no chains. I used to like to downshift and use engine
> >> braking
> >> like you're describing. Worked great and was fun, too.
> >> One evening, in the dark and cold by a long deserted stretch along
> >> the coast, somewhere near Oceanside, CA, cruising down the freeway,
> >> I lost power and was stranded by the side of the road.
> >> Even though I'd been downshifting smoothly, turns out the extra
> >> pressure had stripped out the splines in the clutch disk.

> >
> >
> > There is a world of difference between pulling an automatic back thru
> > the gears (or just one gear) and performing rev-matched downshifts
> > with a manual transmission. In the first instance you are forcing the
> > bands and clutches to work, while in the manual, clutch slippage is
> > minimal if done correctly ( double declutch).
> >
> > It's interesting from a learner's point of view also. Here in
> > Australia, learner drivers are taught to downshift in manual
> > transmission vehicles, for engine assisted braking as well as using
> > the brake-pedal. Its improves stability and sets the car up in the
> > right gear for exiting the situation.
> >
> > I agree with your reluctance to punish the automatic.
> >
> > In the case of the bike, that drive-shaft spline stripping is a design
> > weakness. There are numerous splines in a FWD car which work happily
> > in both direction of drive or torque.
> >
> > Jason

>
> Jason. The BMW K series would strip the transmission input splines if

they
> were not periodically lubricated as mentioned in the BMW Tech bulletins.
> There were 22 spline "teeth" instead of the typcial 8 (BMW's explanation

was
> dubious to me at the time). The splines on K-series final drive pinion
> shaft (without ParaLever)were not known for stripping at all.


More splines is supposed to increase strength,..but where you have a sliding
spline I guess more teeth means greater wear-rate perhaps.



> Jason, in the case of FWD cars, the multi ball CV joints not only operate

at
> an angle as necessary, they ALSO have some linear travel capability just
> like a slip yoke (on splines). So the only splines that are present in
> automatics is to facilitate locking a shaft to a hub and securing it with

a
> circlip or locknut.


Yep,...I now realise the BMW spline was also required to 'slide' as opposed
to just 'locking' . Regular greasing would have been mandatory.

Jason


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