Question about Toyota timing-belt repair

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Old 15 May 2005, 10:18 pm   #1 (permalink)
al2048@aol.com
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Default Question about Toyota timing-belt repair

Hello. I have a 1998 Toyota Camry LE. The engine is a 2.2-L, 4-cylinder

engine.


The car is, obviously, about 7 years old. However, the car has only
28000 miles on it.


Recently, a Toyota dealership performed an oil change. As part of the
oil change, the dealership performed a routine inspection of the car.
The mechanics at the dealership said that they examined the car's
timing belt and that the timing belt was cracked. The mechanics said
that the timing belt needs to be replaced. The mechanics will charge a
little over $300 for the job.


The mechanics said that the belt is cracked because the car is aging.


I am very skeptical about all of this. From what I have read, people
replace a timing belt every 60000 miles.


Also, the mechanics said that my car has an oil-pan leak. The fix for
that will also be a little over $300.


I will probably get a second opinion from another shop. However, I
would like some input from the people in this newsgroup. Is it common
to have a cracked timing belt on a car that is 7 years old and that has

only 28000 miles on it? Is it common to have an oil-pan leak on a car
that is 7 years old and that has only 28000 miles on it?


Thanks for any information.


Regards,


Alex K.

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Old 16 May 2005, 05:28 am   #2 (permalink)
Hopkins
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Default Re: Question about Toyota timing-belt repair

Well, I agree with the "second opinion" part. Did they say just how
they checked the timing belt?

While age may have an effect, seven years doesn't seem a long time. I
last did mine 4/99.

As for the leak, it wouldn't surprise me. At 4,000 miles per year it's
not getting much use. Gaskets shrink/dry out. Is the car driven often
or does it sit for long periods?

$300 for the timing belt sounds right, but $300 for the oil pan sounds
crazy.

There are techs who participate in this group -- they'll have much more
input to offer than I.

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Old 16 May 2005, 10:16 am   #3 (permalink)
Ken Day
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Default Re: Question about Toyota timing-belt repair

On 15 May 2005 20:18:19 -0700, al2048@aol.com wrote:

>Hello. I have a 1998 Toyota Camry LE. The engine is a 2.2-L, 4-cylinder
>
>engine.
>
>
>The car is, obviously, about 7 years old. However, the car has only
>28000 miles on it.
>
>
>Recently, a Toyota dealership performed an oil change. As part of the
>oil change, the dealership performed a routine inspection of the car.
>The mechanics at the dealership said that they examined the car's
>timing belt and that the timing belt was cracked. The mechanics said
>that the timing belt needs to be replaced. The mechanics will charge a
>little over $300 for the job.
>
>
>The mechanics said that the belt is cracked because the car is aging.
>
>
>I am very skeptical about all of this. From what I have read, people
>replace a timing belt every 60000 miles.
>
>
>Also, the mechanics said that my car has an oil-pan leak. The fix for
>that will also be a little over $300.
>
>
>I will probably get a second opinion from another shop. However, I
>would like some input from the people in this newsgroup. Is it common
>to have a cracked timing belt on a car that is 7 years old and that has
>
>only 28000 miles on it? Is it common to have an oil-pan leak on a car
>that is 7 years old and that has only 28000 miles on it?
>
>
>Thanks for any information.
>
>
>Regards,
>
>
>Alex K.

Ask them how they know the belt is cracked. You can't see it with a
'routine' inspection. The top motor mount and top timing gear cover
has to be removed along with a few other small things and it does
require about 30 minutes or more just to get a look at the belt.
Anyway , a visual inspection of the belt doesn't usually reveal much
about the condition of the belt. Need to be replaced according to
mileage. At 28,000 I doubt you need a timing belt .

Also , 300.00 is quite a bit to fix a leaking oil pan...IMO. Thats
something you can easily do yourself if you are a bit of handyman.
There is no gasket on the pan , you just use RTV sealant. I don't
think there is anything blocking access to the oil pan on that car. I
know there isn't on my 96 Camry 2.2.
If you decide to do it yourself , I would suggest investing in a
manual. A Haynes will do just fine. It will show you how to remove pan
, apply the sealant and torque the pan bolts.

Ken Day

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Old 16 May 2005, 12:06 pm   #4 (permalink)
Daniel
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Default Re: Question about Toyota timing-belt repair

Ken Day wrote:
>
> Also , 300.00 is quite a bit to fix a leaking oil pan...IMO. Thats
> something you can easily do yourself if you are a bit of handyman.
> There is no gasket on the pan , you just use RTV sealant. I don't
> think there is anything blocking access to the oil pan on that car. I
> know there isn't on my 96 Camry 2.2.

-------------------
The exhaust pipe blocks removal of the oil pan.
Best to replace bolts, nuts and gaskets with new when dismantling
exhaust components.
The old nuts on the exhaust manifold are tight, and you need a long
extension, but apart from labor, parts are not costly. But then, that's
true of the timing belt replacement also.

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Old 16 May 2005, 04:36 pm   #5 (permalink)
JM
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Default Re: Question about Toyota timing-belt repair


<al2048@aol.com> wrote in message
news:1116213499.457222.282360@g49g2000cwa.googlegr oups.com...
> Hello. I have a 1998 Toyota Camry LE. The engine is a 2.2-L, 4-cylinder
>
> engine.
>
>
> The car is, obviously, about 7 years old. However, the car has only
> 28000 miles on it.
>
>
> Recently, a Toyota dealership performed an oil change. As part of the
> oil change, the dealership performed a routine inspection of the car.
> The mechanics at the dealership said that they examined the car's
> timing belt and that the timing belt was cracked. The mechanics said
> that the timing belt needs to be replaced. The mechanics will charge a
> little over $300 for the job.
>
>Snip.


Hi,

I had my timing belt changed at 62000miles and 8 years 5 months
On a 95 2.2 CAMRY
I had the belt saved for me to inspect.
There did not seem to be any obvious cracking or crazing.
Mech said was good for long way yet.
Like others I cant see how they could just inspect the belt easily.
At 28k I don't think it would worry me unduly because of age.

But mine is changed now and , better for my peace of mind.

Johnny UK.



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Old 16 May 2005, 06:55 pm   #6 (permalink)
Qslim
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Default Re: Question about Toyota timing-belt repair

I replaced a broken timing belt on a customers car a few weeks ago. It was a
97 with thirty something k on it, I can't remember for sure. It's not
outrageous at all for them to recommend you change it. Believe it or not,
letting a timing belt (or any other belt) sit and sit and sit will shorten
it's life faster than if it is running its component. The belt cracks
because one or more areas spend their time stretched around whatever
sprocket they are driving, so the tension is distributed unevenly. So as a
rule I always recommend following the time recommendation ahead of the
mileage, as I have seen more breaks older low mileage cars.
Oh, and it only takes a few minutes to get a look at a part of the belt.
You don't really have to take all the crap off someone alse was
describing.
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Old 16 May 2005, 08:59 pm   #7 (permalink)
al2048@aol.com
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Default Re: Question about Toyota timing-belt repair


Qslim wrote:
> I replaced a broken timing belt on a customers car a few weeks ago.

It was a
> 97 with thirty something k on it, I can't remember for sure. It's not
> outrageous at all for them to recommend you change it. Believe it or

not,
> letting a timing belt (or any other belt) sit and sit and sit will

shorten
> it's life faster than if it is running its component. The belt cracks
> because one or more areas spend their time stretched around whatever
> sprocket they are driving, so the tension is distributed unevenly. So

as a
> rule I always recommend following the time recommendation ahead of

the
> mileage, as I have seen more breaks older low mileage cars.
> Oh, and it only takes a few minutes to get a look at a part of the

belt.
> You don't really have to take all the crap off someone alse was
> describing.




I called a different repair shop and asked about inspecting the timing
belt. The guy told me that inspecting the timing belt would take three
hours. Since I knew that the original shop did not have my car for
three hours, I wondered how much the original shop had actually
examined my car.

So, I called the original shop. It turns out that the mechanics had
loosened the timing cover and had ONLY taken a peek inside using a
flashlight. The mechanics were not actually able to see any cracks.
However, they saw my car's drive belt and saw that the drive belt was
cracked. Since the drive belt and the timing belt are the same age, the
mechanics assumed that the timing belt was also cracked.

So, is this assumption reasonable? If the drive belt is cracked, does
it necessarily mean that the timing belt is cracked as well?


Regards,

Alex K.

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Old 16 May 2005, 11:24 pm   #8 (permalink)
Ken Day
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Default Re: Question about Toyota timing-belt repair

On 16 May 2005 10:06:12 -0700, "Daniel" <nospampls2002@yahoo.com>
wrote:

>Ken Day wrote:
>>
>> Also , 300.00 is quite a bit to fix a leaking oil pan...IMO. Thats
>> something you can easily do yourself if you are a bit of handyman.
>> There is no gasket on the pan , you just use RTV sealant. I don't
>> think there is anything blocking access to the oil pan on that car. I
>> know there isn't on my 96 Camry 2.2.


>-------------------
>The exhaust pipe blocks removal of the oil pan.


Oops...sorry about that. Forgot about the exhaust pipe. I suppose I
could blame that on a senior moment.
Can't believe I forgot that since I have pulled a Toyota 4 cyl 3 times
in the last 3 months or so.

>Best to replace bolts, nuts and gaskets with new when dismantling
>exhaust components.
>The old nuts on the exhaust manifold are tight, and you need a long
>extension, but apart from labor, parts are not costly. But then, that's
>true of the timing belt replacement also.


The 3 nuts on the exhaust pipe usually come off pretty easy after a
few squirts of liquid wrench , sometimes without that. You will need a
14mm socket and a 12" extension . The exhaust hangar immediately
behind oil pan has 2 12mm bolts and they are easy to get to and easy
to remove. This will let the exhaust drop down out of your way, at
least enough to get the pan off and back on.

Ken Day

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Old 16 May 2005, 11:38 pm   #9 (permalink)
Ken Day
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Default Re: Question about Toyota timing-belt repair

On Mon, 16 May 2005 23:55:28 GMT, "Qslim" <suckers@suckers.com> wrote:

>I replaced a broken timing belt on a customers car a few weeks ago. It was a
>97 with thirty something k on it, I can't remember for sure. It's not
>outrageous at all for them to recommend you change it. Believe it or not,
>letting a timing belt (or any other belt) sit and sit and sit will shorten
>it's life faster than if it is running its component. The belt cracks
>because one or more areas spend their time stretched around whatever
>sprocket they are driving, so the tension is distributed unevenly. So as a
>rule I always recommend following the time recommendation ahead of the
>mileage, as I have seen more breaks older low mileage cars.



> Oh, and it only takes a few minutes to get a look at a part of the belt.
> You don't really have to take all the crap off someone alse was
> describing.


With all due respect , how do you get more than a peek at the belt
without removing the cover ? I know you can pull the cover back a
little but you see only the outer surface of the belt . Am I missing
something here ? I would think you would also need to get a decent
look at the teeth on the belt.
Is there a way to get the cover off without removing the mount ? It
takes a bit of wiggling for me ...well , wiggling the cover , not me
(sometimes wiggle my a** a bit and cuss a little ) even after removing
the mount, to get it off.

Ken Day
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Old 17 May 2005, 12:54 am   #10 (permalink)
al2048@aol.com
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Default Re: Question about Toyota timing-belt repair


Hopkins wrote:
> $300 for the timing belt sounds right, but $300 for the oil pan

sounds
> crazy.
>



As for the oil-pan leak, one shop stated a price of $270, and another
shop stated a price of $240.

Are these prices more reasonable?

If not, what is a good price?



As for the timing belt, one shop stated a price of $280, and another
shop stated a price of $220.

If $300 sounds right for a timing belt, then is $220 too cheap? Should
I be concerned about poor quality at such a low price?



Regards,

Alex K.

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