Tire sizes

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Old 12 Aug 2005, 02:39 pm   #1 (permalink)
Bassplayer12
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Default Tire sizes

I have a 93 Toyota Camry and was looking today at a 97 for sale at a local
retailer. The 97 had a different tire size than mine.
I presently use 195-70-14 and was wondering if this is the ideal size for my
model year and what effect the size you use affect fuel consumption.


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Old 12 Aug 2005, 03:21 pm   #2 (permalink)
J Strickland
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Default Re: Tire sizes

That's a rather open ended question with no right answer.

The car came with what is arguably the best all around tire for most people.
You can change tires to pretty much anything that will fit, but you do have
a few contraints to keep in mind.

The overall tire diameter is an important number, and you arrive at it by
multiplying the the first two numbers (195) and (70%, or .70) to get
136.5mm. This number is the size of the sidewall. Convert this number to
inches by dividing by 24.7, then double it (there are two sidewalls to
consider), then add in the rim diameter - 14 in your case.

195 is the number that defines the width of the tire.
70 is the aspect ratio, or the size of the sidewall as a ratio of the tread
width.
14 is the rim diameter.

All tires you buy have to be 14 so they can fit the rim. You can buy 15 or
16 rims, but then you need to buy tires with a 15 or 16 in the size, and a
lower number to represent the aspect ratio. For example, your current tires
are an overall diameter, sidewall + rim = overall diameter, of 25.05 inches.
25 is close enough.

If you wanted wider tires and larger rims, you might consider 215/60x15.
Let's see if that works out. 215 x .6 (width x aspect ratio) = 129 / 24.7
(sidewall in mm converted to inches) = 5.22 x 2 = 10.44 + 15 (both sidewalls
+ rim) = 25.44 (overall diameter). This would be a physically larger tire by
just under a half inch, and would work OK on your car, assuming they are not
too wide to fit inside the fenders. I can't think of any reason why these
wouldn't fit, but the tire guys can help you figure out what will actually
fit.)

The considerations besides the physical limitations of stuffing tires inside
the fenders are that the tire diameter can affect the gear ratio of the
drive train and the speedometer. A change of a half inch isn't going to be a
big deal for either the drivetrain or the speedo, but the speedo will be a
tad slower (larger tires don't turn as fast, so 60 might really be 60 -
today it's closer to 57- or it could go to about 61 or 62), the trouble hear
is that you could do the speed limit on your speedo, but still get tagged
for a mile or two over the posted limit. Personally, I don't think the cops
car much about a mile or two because there are plenty of idiots that will
give them 10 or 15.

If you throw your gearing out of whack (trucks and Jeeps do this, you aren't
going to do it in your Camry) is that the engine doesn't work in the right
place anymore, the engine lugs on the freeway and slows down at the least
sign of an incline. The speedo is way out when this happens too. these guys
have to get new gears installed in the differential, and a gear to drive the
speedo, but they are taking a roughly 30 inch tire and replacing it with a
lift kit and 35 inch tires. Your Camry isn't going to tolerate this kind of
abuse, so all you have to worry about is that the speedo will go from
reading a fit fast (reads 60 when really doing 57) to reading correctly, or
a bit slow.

The wider tires will grip better, if you care about that sort of thing, but
the narrower sidewalls will ride stiffer. In my case, I changed my BMW rims
from a 15 to a 17, but already had the width that fit, so I got smaller
sidewalls. I already had the grip, and now I have the harsh ride too. All of
the behavior issues taken into account, my change was the right one, and I
think you will be pleasantly surprised if you go from the 195/70x14 to the
215/60x15, or maybe even a 215/50x16. Do the math and see if it fits.




"Bassplayer12" <perettij@nbnet.nb.ca> wrote in message
news:XV6Le.73893$Ph4.2305133@ursa-nb00s0.nbnet.nb.ca...
>I have a 93 Toyota Camry and was looking today at a 97 for sale at a local
>retailer. The 97 had a different tire size than mine.
> I presently use 195-70-14 and was wondering if this is the ideal size for
> my model year and what effect the size you use affect fuel consumption.
>



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Old 12 Aug 2005, 04:29 pm   #3 (permalink)
Ray O
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Default Re: Tire sizes


"J Strickland" <spam@nospam.net> wrote in message
news:eIadnebqAJ3QmWDfRVn-1g@ez2.net...
> That's a rather open ended question with no right answer.
>

<very thorough snipped>

>
> All tires you buy have to be 14 so they can fit the rim. You can buy 15 or
> 16 rims, but then you need to buy tires with a 15 or 16 in the size, and a
> lower number to represent the aspect ratio. For example, your current
> tires are an overall diameter, sidewall + rim = overall diameter, of 25.05
> inches. 25 is close enough.


IIRC, the 97 Camry was available with 14 inch and 15 inch wheels, depending
on trim and engine.

The easy answer to the OP's question regarding the ideal size for his model
and year is to look up the factory original wheel and tire size - that is
the ideal size for most people and is probably a good compromise between
performance and fuel consumption.

--
Ray O
correct the return address punctuation to reply

>
>
>
> "Bassplayer12" <perettij@nbnet.nb.ca> wrote in message
> news:XV6Le.73893$Ph4.2305133@ursa-nb00s0.nbnet.nb.ca...
>>I have a 93 Toyota Camry and was looking today at a 97 for sale at a local
>>retailer. The 97 had a different tire size than mine.
>> I presently use 195-70-14 and was wondering if this is the ideal size for
>> my model year and what effect the size you use affect fuel consumption.
>>

>
>



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Old 12 Aug 2005, 05:25 pm   #4 (permalink)
mrcheerful .
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Default Re: Tire sizes


"J Strickland" <spam@nospam.net> wrote in message
news:eIadnebqAJ3QmWDfRVn-1g@ez2.net...
> That's a rather open ended question with no right answer.
>
> The car came with what is arguably the best all around tire for most
> people. You can change tires to pretty much anything that will fit, but
> you do have a few contraints to keep in mind.
>
> The overall tire diameter is an important number, and you arrive at it by
> multiplying the the first two numbers (195) and (70%, or .70) to get
> 136.5mm. This number is the size of the sidewall. Convert this number to
> inches by dividing by 24.7, then double it (there are two sidewalls to
> consider), then add in the rim diameter - 14 in your case.
>
> 195 is the number that defines the width of the tire.
> 70 is the aspect ratio, or the size of the sidewall as a ratio of the
> tread width.
> 14 is the rim diameter.
>
> All tires you buy have to be 14 so they can fit the rim. You can buy 15 or
> 16 rims, but then you need to buy tires with a 15 or 16 in the size, and a
> lower number to represent the aspect ratio. For example, your current
> tires are an overall diameter, sidewall + rim = overall diameter, of 25.05
> inches. 25 is close enough.
>
> If you wanted wider tires and larger rims, you might consider 215/60x15.
> Let's see if that works out. 215 x .6 (width x aspect ratio) = 129 / 24.7
> (sidewall in mm converted to inches) = 5.22 x 2 = 10.44 + 15 (both
> sidewalls + rim) = 25.44 (overall diameter). This would be a physically
> larger tire by just under a half inch, and would work OK on your car,
> assuming they are not too wide to fit inside the fenders. I can't think of
> any reason why these wouldn't fit, but the tire guys can help you figure
> out what will actually fit.)
>
> The considerations besides the physical limitations of stuffing tires
> inside the fenders are that the tire diameter can affect the gear ratio of
> the drive train and the speedometer. A change of a half inch isn't going
> to be a big deal for either the drivetrain or the speedo, but the speedo
> will be a tad slower (larger tires don't turn as fast, so 60 might really
> be 60 - today it's closer to 57- or it could go to about 61 or 62), the
> trouble hear is that you could do the speed limit on your speedo, but
> still get tagged for a mile or two over the posted limit. Personally, I
> don't think the cops car much about a mile or two because there are plenty
> of idiots that will give them 10 or 15.
>
> If you throw your gearing out of whack (trucks and Jeeps do this, you
> aren't going to do it in your Camry) is that the engine doesn't work in
> the right place anymore, the engine lugs on the freeway and slows down at
> the least sign of an incline. The speedo is way out when this happens too.
> these guys have to get new gears installed in the differential, and a gear
> to drive the speedo, but they are taking a roughly 30 inch tire and
> replacing it with a lift kit and 35 inch tires. Your Camry isn't going to
> tolerate this kind of abuse, so all you have to worry about is that the
> speedo will go from reading a fit fast (reads 60 when really doing 57) to
> reading correctly, or a bit slow.
>
> The wider tires will grip better, if you care about that sort of thing,
> but the narrower sidewalls will ride stiffer. In my case, I changed my BMW
> rims from a 15 to a 17, but already had the width that fit, so I got
> smaller sidewalls. I already had the grip, and now I have the harsh ride
> too. All of the behavior issues taken into account, my change was the
> right one, and I think you will be pleasantly surprised if you go from the
> 195/70x14 to the 215/60x15, or maybe even a 215/50x16. Do the math and see
> if it fits.
>
>
>
>
> "Bassplayer12" <perettij@nbnet.nb.ca> wrote in message
> news:XV6Le.73893$Ph4.2305133@ursa-nb00s0.nbnet.nb.ca...
>>I have a 93 Toyota Camry and was looking today at a 97 for sale at a local
>>retailer. The 97 had a different tire size than mine.
>> I presently use 195-70-14 and was wondering if this is the ideal size for
>> my model year and what effect the size you use affect fuel consumption.
>>


the conversion to inches is 25.4 mm per inch, not 24.7


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Old 12 Aug 2005, 07:08 pm   #5 (permalink)
Hopkins
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Default Re: Tire sizes

>IIRC, the 97 Camry was available with 14 inch and 15 inch wheels, depending
>on trim and engine.


Same goes for the '93's.

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Old 12 Aug 2005, 07:14 pm   #6 (permalink)
HachiRoku
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Default Re: Tire sizes

On Fri, 12 Aug 2005 19:39:35 +0000, Bassplayer12 wrote:

> I have a 93 Toyota Camry and was looking today at a 97 for sale at a local
> retailer. The 97 had a different tire size than mine.
> I presently use 195-70-14 and was wondering if this is the ideal size for my
> model year and what effect the size you use affect fuel consumption.


Compare tire sizes here:

http://www.miata.net/garage/tirecalc.html

or here:

http://www.1010tires.com/TireSizeCalculator.asp

or here:

http://www.dakota-truck.net/TIRECALC/tirecalc.html


Bear in mind, changing tire sizes is a bit tricky; you throw the geometry
off in the steering and suspension. Your best bet is to come up with a
wheel/tire combination that gives you the same overall diameter as what
you have.

Using the Miata.net link above, there is a picture of the tires as you
enter the numbers. For a larger rim, you want a smaller sidewall. This
does a number of things:

It keeps the speedometer accurate, or at least as accurate as possible

it sort of keeps the geometry close to what the engineers had in mind.

it may (usually) increase handling, but may also make the car handle like
a nightmare!

I don't quite get the question you're posing. If I'm guessing right, you
DON'T want to try using your 14" tires on a car designed for 17"!!! You
COULD possibly got to a 15", or better, 16" rim for winter tires, but you
certainly don't want to try 14" tires on the newer car!

http://www.dakota-truck.net/TIRECALC/tirecalc.html
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Old 13 Aug 2005, 12:26 pm   #7 (permalink)
Bassplayer12
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Default Re: Tire sizes

Thanks for your very elaborate reply.
I'll rephrase my question: what tire size most owners 92-96 Camry's use and
why?
What difference did you guys found in the different sizes?
I bought this 93 used and it had 195-70-14 installed. Is it the best size
recommended by the factory?
Thanks.


"Ray O" <rokigawa@tristarassociatesDOT.com> wrote in message
news:abe32$42fd14b2$44a4a10d$30089@msgid.meganewss ervers.com...
>
> "J Strickland" <spam@nospam.net> wrote in message
> news:eIadnebqAJ3QmWDfRVn-1g@ez2.net...
>> That's a rather open ended question with no right answer.
>>

> <very thorough snipped>
>
>>
>> All tires you buy have to be 14 so they can fit the rim. You can buy 15
>> or 16 rims, but then you need to buy tires with a 15 or 16 in the size,
>> and a lower number to represent the aspect ratio. For example, your
>> current tires are an overall diameter, sidewall + rim = overall diameter,
>> of 25.05 inches. 25 is close enough.

>
> IIRC, the 97 Camry was available with 14 inch and 15 inch wheels,
> depending on trim and engine.
>
> The easy answer to the OP's question regarding the ideal size for his
> model and year is to look up the factory original wheel and tire size -
> that is the ideal size for most people and is probably a good compromise
> between performance and fuel consumption.
>
> --
> Ray O
> correct the return address punctuation to reply
>
>>
>>
>>
>> "Bassplayer12" <perettij@nbnet.nb.ca> wrote in message
>> news:XV6Le.73893$Ph4.2305133@ursa-nb00s0.nbnet.nb.ca...
>>>I have a 93 Toyota Camry and was looking today at a 97 for sale at a
>>>local retailer. The 97 had a different tire size than mine.
>>> I presently use 195-70-14 and was wondering if this is the ideal size
>>> for my model year and what effect the size you use affect fuel
>>> consumption.
>>>

>>
>>

>
>



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Old 13 Aug 2005, 12:44 pm   #8 (permalink)
Ray O
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Default Re: Tire sizes



"Bassplayer12" <perettij@nbnet.nb.ca> wrote in message
news:T2qLe.74242$Ph4.2318096@ursa-nb00s0.nbnet.nb.ca...
> Thanks for your very elaborate reply.
> I'll rephrase my question: what tire size most owners 92-96 Camry's use
> and why?


The tire size installed as original equipment tire size is the one
recommended by the factory. In other words, they wouldn't recommend one
size and install another.

A 1993 4 cylinder Camry came with 195/70-14.

1993 Camry Coupe and 6 cylinder Camrys came with 205/65-15.

Most owners use these sizes because they fit the factory wheels without
having to purchase new wheels.

> What difference did you guys found in the different sizes?


People install different tire sizes because of appearance and for improved
handling. If you like the conestoga wagon look, go to a bigger diameter
wheel and lower profile tire. Ride comfort and tire life will suffer
greatly. In theory, handling will improve but most people do not have the
driving experience to take advantage of the marginal improvement in
handling, especially on streets (not on a track).

You can go to www.tirerack.com to do more research.

--
Ray O
correct the return address punctuation to reply

> I bought this 93 used and it had 195-70-14 installed. Is it the best size
> recommended by the factory?
> Thanks.
>
>
> "Ray O" <rokigawa@tristarassociatesDOT.com> wrote in message
> news:abe32$42fd14b2$44a4a10d$30089@msgid.meganewss ervers.com...
>>
>> "J Strickland" <spam@nospam.net> wrote in message
>> news:eIadnebqAJ3QmWDfRVn-1g@ez2.net...
>>> That's a rather open ended question with no right answer.
>>>

>> <very thorough snipped>
>>
>>>
>>> All tires you buy have to be 14 so they can fit the rim. You can buy 15
>>> or 16 rims, but then you need to buy tires with a 15 or 16 in the size,
>>> and a lower number to represent the aspect ratio. For example, your
>>> current tires are an overall diameter, sidewall + rim = overall
>>> diameter, of 25.05 inches. 25 is close enough.

>>
>> IIRC, the 97 Camry was available with 14 inch and 15 inch wheels,
>> depending on trim and engine.
>>
>> The easy answer to the OP's question regarding the ideal size for his
>> model and year is to look up the factory original wheel and tire size -
>> that is the ideal size for most people and is probably a good compromise
>> between performance and fuel consumption.
>>
>> --
>> Ray O
>> correct the return address punctuation to reply
>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> "Bassplayer12" <perettij@nbnet.nb.ca> wrote in message
>>> news:XV6Le.73893$Ph4.2305133@ursa-nb00s0.nbnet.nb.ca...
>>>>I have a 93 Toyota Camry and was looking today at a 97 for sale at a
>>>>local retailer. The 97 had a different tire size than mine.
>>>> I presently use 195-70-14 and was wondering if this is the ideal size
>>>> for my model year and what effect the size you use affect fuel
>>>> consumption.
>>>>
>>>
>>>

>>
>>

>
>



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Old 15 Aug 2005, 10:45 am   #9 (permalink)
J Strickland
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Default Re: Tire sizes

The size recommended by the factory is (or should be) on a placard on the
driver door jamb, or inside the glove box.




"Bassplayer12" <perettij@nbnet.nb.ca> wrote in message
news:T2qLe.74242$Ph4.2318096@ursa-nb00s0.nbnet.nb.ca...
> Thanks for your very elaborate reply.
> I'll rephrase my question: what tire size most owners 92-96 Camry's use
> and why?
> What difference did you guys found in the different sizes?
> I bought this 93 used and it had 195-70-14 installed. Is it the best size
> recommended by the factory?
> Thanks.
>
>
> "Ray O" <rokigawa@tristarassociatesDOT.com> wrote in message
> news:abe32$42fd14b2$44a4a10d$30089@msgid.meganewss ervers.com...
>>
>> "J Strickland" <spam@nospam.net> wrote in message
>> news:eIadnebqAJ3QmWDfRVn-1g@ez2.net...
>>> That's a rather open ended question with no right answer.
>>>

>> <very thorough snipped>
>>
>>>
>>> All tires you buy have to be 14 so they can fit the rim. You can buy 15
>>> or 16 rims, but then you need to buy tires with a 15 or 16 in the size,
>>> and a lower number to represent the aspect ratio. For example, your
>>> current tires are an overall diameter, sidewall + rim = overall
>>> diameter, of 25.05 inches. 25 is close enough.

>>
>> IIRC, the 97 Camry was available with 14 inch and 15 inch wheels,
>> depending on trim and engine.
>>
>> The easy answer to the OP's question regarding the ideal size for his
>> model and year is to look up the factory original wheel and tire size -
>> that is the ideal size for most people and is probably a good compromise
>> between performance and fuel consumption.
>>
>> --
>> Ray O
>> correct the return address punctuation to reply
>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> "Bassplayer12" <perettij@nbnet.nb.ca> wrote in message
>>> news:XV6Le.73893$Ph4.2305133@ursa-nb00s0.nbnet.nb.ca...
>>>>I have a 93 Toyota Camry and was looking today at a 97 for sale at a
>>>>local retailer. The 97 had a different tire size than mine.
>>>> I presently use 195-70-14 and was wondering if this is the ideal size
>>>> for my model year and what effect the size you use affect fuel
>>>> consumption.
>>>>
>>>
>>>

>>
>>

>
>



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Old 15 Aug 2005, 10:48 am   #10 (permalink)
J Strickland
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Default Re: Tire sizes


"Ray O" <rokigawa@tristarassociatesDOT.com> wrote in message
news:47be9$42fe3191$180fead6$15762@msgid.meganewss ervers.com...
>
>
> "Bassplayer12" <perettij@nbnet.nb.ca> wrote in message
> news:T2qLe.74242$Ph4.2318096@ursa-nb00s0.nbnet.nb.ca...
>> Thanks for your very elaborate reply.
>> I'll rephrase my question: what tire size most owners 92-96 Camry's use
>> and why?

>
> The tire size installed as original equipment tire size is the one
> recommended by the factory. In other words, they wouldn't recommend one
> size and install another.
>
> A 1993 4 cylinder Camry came with 195/70-14.
>
> 1993 Camry Coupe and 6 cylinder Camrys came with 205/65-15.
>
> Most owners use these sizes because they fit the factory wheels without
> having to purchase new wheels.
>
>> What difference did you guys found in the different sizes?

>
> People install different tire sizes because of appearance and for improved
> handling. If you like the conestoga wagon look, go to a bigger diameter
> wheel and lower profile tire. Ride comfort and tire life will suffer
> greatly. In theory, handling will improve but most people do not have the
> driving experience to take advantage of the marginal improvement in
> handling, especially on streets (not on a track).
>




I'm not sure I would characterize the affect of larger rims as "suffer
greatly". I took my BMW from the standard 15" rim to a 17" rim, and the tire
cost went down while the ride comfort remained about the same. It is a bit
stiffer, but I would not say it suffered greatly. Tire life is about the
same, so far.



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