92 oxidized paint

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Old 12 Sep 2005, 03:02 pm   #1 (permalink)
Marc
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Default 92 oxidized paint

My elderly mother has a low mileage 92 LE sedan that has lived in Florida
and Alabama without a garage. The paint has oxidized from above the
windshield to about a foot back onto the roof. I suggested that she take it
to a dealer's auto body shop and all they could should suggest is a total
repaint. She told them that she was not that elderly and left.

She went by an AutoZone and they said that there is a Maguires product made
for this and they were getting some in. Can anyone offer some suggestions?
The rest of the car is in excellent shape.

Thanks,

Marc


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Old 13 Sep 2005, 11:26 am   #2 (permalink)
Daniel
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Default Re: 92 oxidized paint

You need to offer a fuller description.
The paint has a color coat (over a base coat) and clear coat (finish).
Usually oxidation is a process associated with chalking that occurs on
solid color (non clear coat) finishes, where the surface deteriorates
but something like the Meguiar's product can abrade (polish) away the
surface slightly revealing unblemished paint beneath. We're talking
removing as little as possible - thousandths of an inch or less.
The clear coat is designed to prevent oxidation.
If the clear coat is gone, and the color coat, exposing the base, that
Meguiar's product is not going to help.
Perhaps you could explain a bit further to facilitate suggestions.
Also, need to know if you (she) has solid color like white or black, or
a metallic paint.

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Old 13 Sep 2005, 07:52 pm   #3 (permalink)
Marc
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Default Re: 92 oxidized paint

My mother said that the touch-up paint color is called Frosted Sapphire. The
number on the bottle is 8J4. The car is a solid dark navy and if memory
serves it is metallic although I'm not positive. I would indeed think of
this as chalking now that you mention it.

Unfortunately I don't know any more about car finishes to offer any
additional information.


"Daniel" <nospampls2002@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1126628785.421072.16850@g43g2000cwa.googlegro ups.com...
> You need to offer a fuller description.
> The paint has a color coat (over a base coat) and clear coat (finish).
> Usually oxidation is a process associated with chalking that occurs on
> solid color (non clear coat) finishes, where the surface deteriorates
> but something like the Meguiar's product can abrade (polish) away the
> surface slightly revealing unblemished paint beneath. We're talking
> removing as little as possible - thousandths of an inch or less.
> The clear coat is designed to prevent oxidation.
> If the clear coat is gone, and the color coat, exposing the base, that
> Meguiar's product is not going to help.
> Perhaps you could explain a bit further to facilitate suggestions.
> Also, need to know if you (she) has solid color like white or black, or
> a metallic paint.
>



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Old 13 Sep 2005, 10:31 pm   #4 (permalink)
Vash the Stampede
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Default Re: 92 oxidized paint

On Tue, 13 Sep 2005 20:52:02 -0400, Marc wrote:

> My mother said that the touch-up paint color is called Frosted Sapphire. The
> number on the bottle is 8J4. The car is a solid dark navy and if memory
> serves it is metallic although I'm not positive. I would indeed think of
> this as chalking now that you mention it.
>
> Unfortunately I don't know any more about car finishes to offer any
> additional information.



I would try a different approach before painting:

Look for the Meguire's product. There is a whole line available; the lower
the number the more agressive the compund (well, sort of)

You want to look for an agressive compound to start. I use 3M Fill n'
Glaze as a starter. Most times it will do what you want, but you may have
to get more agressive than that. Unfortunately, Fill n Glaze has been
replaced; the replacement is almost as good.

You'll also need a 7" or so buffer, you can buy or rent.

Put the compound on the surface, cool and out of the sun. Start with a
lower buffing speed and buff the damaged area. If this dies not work, add
more compund and increase the speed of the wheel slightly. You want to be
at 2,500 RPM. This should work. Then cover with a good (Meguire's) Paste
wax and it should look OK. Since weathering has probably chewed off the
clear coat, you can either re-clear coat or keep the area well waxed.

if you need to go more agressive than Fill n Glaze, use a liquid rubbing
compound or a paste one. BE CAREFUL!!! You could totally ruin the paint or
burn right through it!

Good Luck! (BTW, I am a Pro Detailer at a Toy dealer...)


>
>
> "Daniel" <nospampls2002@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:1126628785.421072.16850@g43g2000cwa.googlegro ups.com...
>> You need to offer a fuller description.
>> The paint has a color coat (over a base coat) and clear coat (finish).
>> Usually oxidation is a process associated with chalking that occurs on
>> solid color (non clear coat) finishes, where the surface deteriorates
>> but something like the Meguiar's product can abrade (polish) away the
>> surface slightly revealing unblemished paint beneath. We're talking
>> removing as little as possible - thousandths of an inch or less.
>> The clear coat is designed to prevent oxidation.
>> If the clear coat is gone, and the color coat, exposing the base, that
>> Meguiar's product is not going to help.
>> Perhaps you could explain a bit further to facilitate suggestions.
>> Also, need to know if you (she) has solid color like white or black, or
>> a metallic paint.
>>


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Old 14 Sep 2005, 12:12 pm   #5 (permalink)
Daniel
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Default Re: 92 oxidized paint

I could be wrong, having never done this, but I'd be reluctant to use a
power buffer on the first attempt.
Try application by hand first.
You can get some pretty good buffing action going with a simple cotton
pad, and that way you can gauge how much color is coming off on the
cloth before inadvertently "burning" right through the finish.
As a pro, working daily, you want the power tool, for for the first
timer, slower could be better.

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Old 14 Sep 2005, 04:22 pm   #6 (permalink)
Marc
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Default Re: 92 oxidized paint

Good point, although the poor 80 year old woman was all excited that she
would be able to use a power buffer. I will tell her that whatever product
she uses to keep looking at the cloth to see if it starts to get blue and
then leave it alone for a while to see if the area looks like it's improved
before continuing.

Thanks

Marc




"Daniel" <nospampls2002@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1126717937.603574.137720@g49g2000cwa.googlegr oups.com...
>I could be wrong, having never done this, but I'd be reluctant to use a
> power buffer on the first attempt.
> Try application by hand first.
> You can get some pretty good buffing action going with a simple cotton
> pad, and that way you can gauge how much color is coming off on the
> cloth before inadvertently "burning" right through the finish.
> As a pro, working daily, you want the power tool, for for the first
> timer, slower could be better.
>



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Old 14 Sep 2005, 09:44 pm   #7 (permalink)
Vash the Stampede
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Default Re: 92 oxidized paint

On Wed, 14 Sep 2005 10:12:17 -0700, Daniel wrote:

> I could be wrong, having never done this, but I'd be reluctant to use a
> power buffer on the first attempt.
> Try application by hand first.
> You can get some pretty good buffing action going with a simple cotton
> pad, and that way you can gauge how much color is coming off on the
> cloth before inadvertently "burning" right through the finish.
> As a pro, working daily, you want the power tool, for for the first
> timer, slower could be better.



Gotta learn sometime! Start slow and work up; as I always say, start with
the LEAST agressive method and get more aggressive as required!

From his description, it sounds like age/oxidation/acid rain have taken
their toll. Short of painting (which is a pain) a good buffing would be
the next best thing. How badly can he ruin the paint?
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Old 14 Sep 2005, 09:46 pm   #8 (permalink)
Vash the Stampede
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Default Re: 92 oxidized paint

On Wed, 14 Sep 2005 17:22:25 -0400, Marc wrote:

> Good point, although the poor 80 year old woman was all excited that she
> would be able to use a power buffer. I will tell her that whatever product
> she uses to keep looking at the cloth to see if it starts to get blue and
> then leave it alone for a while to see if the area looks like it's improved
> before continuing.
>
> Thanks
>
> Marc


i thought YOU were doing this for her!

OK, there's a picture: an 80YO woman with a cloth and a bottle of
Meguire's, standing on a milk crate to reach the roof...

My mistake!


>
>
>
>
> "Daniel" <nospampls2002@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:1126717937.603574.137720@g49g2000cwa.googlegr oups.com...
>>I could be wrong, having never done this, but I'd be reluctant to use a
>> power buffer on the first attempt.
>> Try application by hand first.
>> You can get some pretty good buffing action going with a simple cotton
>> pad, and that way you can gauge how much color is coming off on the
>> cloth before inadvertently "burning" right through the finish. As a
>> pro, working daily, you want the power tool, for for the first timer,
>> slower could be better.
>>


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Old 14 Sep 2005, 10:55 pm   #9 (permalink)
Marc
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Default Re: 92 oxidized paint

No problem. The good thing is that at her age she's covered by medicare.

Seriously, I didn't say so but she's in Alabama and I'm in Massachusetts.


"Vash the Stampede" <Trigun@2am.cn> wrote in message
newsan.2005.09.14.18.48.02.988118@2am.cn...
> On Wed, 14 Sep 2005 17:22:25 -0400, Marc wrote:
>
>> Good point, although the poor 80 year old woman was all excited that she
>> would be able to use a power buffer. I will tell her that whatever
>> product
>> she uses to keep looking at the cloth to see if it starts to get blue and
>> then leave it alone for a while to see if the area looks like it's
>> improved
>> before continuing.
>>
>> Thanks
>>
>> Marc

>
> i thought YOU were doing this for her!
>
> OK, there's a picture: an 80YO woman with a cloth and a bottle of
> Meguire's, standing on a milk crate to reach the roof...
>
> My mistake!
>
>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> "Daniel" <nospampls2002@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>> news:1126717937.603574.137720@g49g2000cwa.googlegr oups.com...
>>>I could be wrong, having never done this, but I'd be reluctant to use a
>>> power buffer on the first attempt.
>>> Try application by hand first.
>>> You can get some pretty good buffing action going with a simple cotton
>>> pad, and that way you can gauge how much color is coming off on the
>>> cloth before inadvertently "burning" right through the finish. As a
>>> pro, working daily, you want the power tool, for for the first timer,
>>> slower could be better.
>>>

>



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Old 15 Sep 2005, 02:32 pm   #10 (permalink)
Vash the Stampede
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Default Re: 92 oxidized paint

On Wed, 14 Sep 2005 23:55:26 -0400, Marc wrote:

> No problem. The good thing is that at her age she's covered by medicare.
>
> Seriously, I didn't say so but she's in Alabama and I'm in Massachusetts.


Hmmmm...so am I. Western Mass, you know, Liberalsville.

>
>
> "Vash the Stampede" <Trigun@2am.cn> wrote in message
> newsan.2005.09.14.18.48.02.988118@2am.cn...
>> On Wed, 14 Sep 2005 17:22:25 -0400, Marc wrote:
>>
>>> Good point, although the poor 80 year old woman was all excited that she
>>> would be able to use a power buffer. I will tell her that whatever
>>> product
>>> she uses to keep looking at the cloth to see if it starts to get blue and
>>> then leave it alone for a while to see if the area looks like it's
>>> improved
>>> before continuing.
>>>
>>> Thanks
>>>
>>> Marc

>>
>> i thought YOU were doing this for her!
>>
>> OK, there's a picture: an 80YO woman with a cloth and a bottle of
>> Meguire's, standing on a milk crate to reach the roof...
>>
>> My mistake!
>>
>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> "Daniel" <nospampls2002@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>>> news:1126717937.603574.137720@g49g2000cwa.googlegr oups.com...
>>>>I could be wrong, having never done this, but I'd be reluctant to use a
>>>> power buffer on the first attempt.
>>>> Try application by hand first.
>>>> You can get some pretty good buffing action going with a simple cotton
>>>> pad, and that way you can gauge how much color is coming off on the
>>>> cloth before inadvertently "burning" right through the finish. As a
>>>> pro, working daily, you want the power tool, for for the first timer,
>>>> slower could be better.
>>>>

>>


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