2002 camry brake flush - how often

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Old 18 Oct 2005, 08:34 pm   #1 (permalink)
Larry Nicholas
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Default 2002 camry brake flush - how often

My toyota dealers says it is time for the brake fluid to be flushed. The car
is three years old now with 25,000 miles on it. What do you think? No where
in my service manual is a brake fluid flush discussed.

Thanks,

Larry


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Old 18 Oct 2005, 09:08 pm   #2 (permalink)
MUADIBŪ
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Default Re: 2002 camry brake flush - how often

Snake Oil.

If you have really dark, discolored Brake fluid, *then* maybe a
flushing of the system might be in order. Typically Brake fluid can go
bad, but it will definitely show in the color of the fluid.
Brake fluid as we know it, is really susceptible to water/moisture
contamination. It abosrbs water from the air even, if exposed to it.
This is why the System is closed and not terribly vented (although it
will be vented or exposed in some manor over time as the fluid is
checked or topped off.)

Short answer is still..............Snake oil.


>My toyota dealers says it is time for the brake fluid to be flushed. The car
>is three years old now with 25,000 miles on it. What do you think? No where
>in my service manual is a brake fluid flush discussed.
>
>Thanks,
>
>Larry
>


Remove "YOURPANTIES" to reply

MUADIBŪ

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Old 19 Oct 2005, 07:10 am   #3 (permalink)
Hachiroku
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Default Re: 2002 camry brake flush - how often

On Tue, 18 Oct 2005 18:34:12 -0700, Larry Nicholas wrote:

> My toyota dealers says it is time for the brake fluid to be flushed. The car
> is three years old now with 25,000 miles on it. What do you think? No where
> in my service manual is a brake fluid flush discussed.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Larry



I didn't flush my '85 until 3 years ago, with 248,000 miles on it.

How much do they want to charge for this? Even using my Gumby Homemade
brake flushing kit and doing it one wheel at a time on jacks and stands it
takes me under an hour and a half, by myself. A mechanic with a lift and
the PROPER equipment can probably do it under an hour, with a $4 can of
brake fluid.
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Old 19 Oct 2005, 10:12 am   #4 (permalink)
NickySantoro
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Default Re: 2002 camry brake flush - how often

On Tue, 18 Oct 2005 18:34:12 -0700, "Larry Nicholas"
<larrynicholas@dock.net> wrote:

>My toyota dealers says it is time for the brake fluid to be flushed. The car
>is three years old now with 25,000 miles on it. What do you think? No where
>in my service manual is a brake fluid flush discussed.
>
>Thanks,
>
>Larry
>

Don't bother. It's another dealer "service" that has no value. I do
mine when I replace pads and it probably doesn't even need it then.
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Old 19 Oct 2005, 12:18 pm   #5 (permalink)
Daniel
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Default Re: 2002 camry brake flush - how often

The theory behind flushing brake fluid is to prolong the life and
functioning of the system.
Like many fluids, if they degrade over time the noticeable effect is
minimal, yet preserving clean fluids is a key to extending the
operating life of the systems.
The hydraulic cylinders that actually move the brake pads are ferrous
metal, subject to pitting from rust over time, plus new brake fluid is
clean - free of grit and wear particles.
Doesn't mean your brakes will fail if you don't change the fluid, but
better if you do.
General recommendation I hear is once every two years.
Brake fluid is hygroscopic - absorbs moisture. There is a small hole
venting to the atmosphere in the master cylinder cap to permit fluid
level to fall as brake pads wear.
There are a variety of ways to drain and flush brake fluid.
You need to keep air out of the system to preserve brake pressure.
Simplest way, and recommended in the Toyota manual, is to fill the
master cylinder, then starting at the wheel furthest from the master
cylinder use an 8mm wrench to open the brake bleeder screw (I find this
easier with the car lifted and wheels removed). You should have a
section of clear plastic tubing pressed over the end of the bleeder
screw and then inserted into a jar to catch fluid and preserve the
fluid seal so no air is admitted when the brake pedal is released.
That's basically it. Have the other person push the brake pedal to the
floor, then tighten the bleed screw. Have them lift their foot from the
brake pedal, you open the bleed screw and have them press again -
holding down until you tighten the bleeder screw again. Continue until
the fluid coming out is clean, new fluid, then do the same at each
consecutively closer wheel.
The supposed potential drawback to this method is that the piston in
the master cylinder travels through a normally unused section of the
bore that can contain more pitting from old fluid that the section of
the bore normally used for braking.
For around $50 or so, you can use a pressurized one person system.
See motiveproducts.com

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Old 19 Oct 2005, 12:20 pm   #6 (permalink)
Daniel
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Default Re: 2002 camry brake flush - how often

The theory behind flushing brake fluid is to prolong the life and
functioning of the system.
Like many fluids, if they degrade over time the noticeable effect is
minimal, yet preserving clean fluids is a key to extending the
operating life of the systems.
The hydraulic cylinders that actually move the brake pads are ferrous
metal, subject to pitting from rust over time, plus new brake fluid is
clean - free of grit and wear particles.
Doesn't mean your brakes will fail if you don't change the fluid, but
better if you do.
General recommendation I hear is once every two years.
Brake fluid is hygroscopic - absorbs moisture. There is a small hole
venting to the atmosphere in the master cylinder cap to permit fluid
level to fall as brake pads wear.
There are a variety of ways to drain and flush brake fluid.
You need to keep air out of the system to preserve brake pressure.
Simplest way, and recommended in the Toyota manual, is to fill the
master cylinder, then starting at the wheel furthest from the master
cylinder use an 8mm wrench to open the brake bleeder screw (I find this
easier with the car lifted and wheels removed). You should have a
section of clear plastic tubing pressed over the end of the bleeder
screw and then inserted into a jar to catch fluid and preserve the
fluid seal so no air is admitted when the brake pedal is released.
That's basically it. Have the other person push the brake pedal to the
floor, then tighten the bleed screw. Have them lift their foot from the
brake pedal, you open the bleed screw and have them press again -
holding down until you tighten the bleeder screw again. Continue until
the fluid coming out is clean, new fluid, then do the same at each
consecutively closer wheel.
The supposed potential drawback to this method is that the piston in
the master cylinder travels through a normally unused section of the
bore that can contain more pitting from old fluid that the section of
the bore normally used for braking.
For around $50 or so, you can use a pressurized one person system.
See motiveproducts.com
Personally, I've found the vacuum bleeder systems too tedious.
Then there is the method I haven't tried of just opening bleeder screws
and letting gravity slowly pull the fluid from the system and patiently
waiting, with a new, full, inverted bottle of brake fluid inserted into
the mater cyliner.

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Old 19 Oct 2005, 04:24 pm   #7 (permalink)
qslim
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Default Re: 2002 camry brake flush - how often

Flushing your brake fluid definintely has benefits. Personally, I exchange
brake fluid on all my cars and bikes once a year. But, I do this for a
living so I have all the equipment that gets it done in a few minutes. I
very well might change my tune if I had to pay 100 bucks to have it done.
Grab a manual and give it a shot. It's really easy.

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Old 20 Oct 2005, 05:39 am   #8 (permalink)
m Ransley
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Default Re: 2002 camry brake flush - how often

Midas did mine for 15$ then I just had it at a friends who had a lift
, while we were looking he noticed 3 wheels never had their bleeders
opened, they ripped me off, so I had them redo it. It should cost only
25$ or so and brake fluid does get contaminated with water, a good idea
to do.

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Old 20 Oct 2005, 07:59 pm   #9 (permalink)
M. Hamill
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Default Re: 2002 camry brake flush - how often

"Larry Nicholas" <larrynicholas@dock.net> wrote in message
news:11lb8kkcjtjg4f6@corp.supernews.com...
> My toyota dealers says it is time for the brake fluid to be flushed. The
> car is three years old now with 25,000 miles on it. What do you think? No
> where in my service manual is a brake fluid flush discussed.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Larry

----
At least have it done whenever you have brake shoes or pads replaced. Like
others have said, brake fluid gets contaminated over time, and when it
happens, your chances of having a brake cylinder leak go way up. (I've had 2
go out out on me on my old Camry.) Also, my master cylinder - and possibly
yours, too - can fail due to contaminated brake fluid, and a master cylinder
failure is more dangerous than a wheel cylinder failure, because while you
can still brake a car when the latter gives out, a master cylinder failure
can disrupt your ability to brake safely on both sets of wheels.

In a more general sense, dirt and contamination are banes to hydraulic
systems of many sorts. Hydraulic power is great for the raw force it can
provide with compact equipment, but hydraulic fluid should be kept clean for
truly dependable operation.


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Old 21 Oct 2005, 02:38 pm   #10 (permalink)
steve-o
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Default Re: 2002 camry brake flush - how often


M. Hamill wrote:
> "Larry Nicholas" <larrynicholas@dock.net> wrote in message
> news:11lb8kkcjtjg4f6@corp.supernews.com...
> > My toyota dealers says it is time for the brake fluid to be flushed. The
> > car is three years old now with 25,000 miles on it. What do you think? No
> > where in my service manual is a brake fluid flush discussed.
> >
> > Thanks,
> >
> > Larry

> ----
> At least have it done whenever you have brake shoes or pads replaced. Like
> others have said, brake fluid gets contaminated over time, and when it
> happens, your chances of having a brake cylinder leak go way up. (I've had 2
> go out out on me on my old Camry.) Also, my master cylinder - and possibly
> yours, too - can fail due to contaminated brake fluid, and a master cylinder
> failure is more dangerous than a wheel cylinder failure, because while you
> can still brake a car when the latter gives out, a master cylinder failure
> can disrupt your ability to brake safely on both sets of wheels.
>
> In a more general sense, dirt and contamination are banes to hydraulic
> systems of many sorts. Hydraulic power is great for the raw force it can
> provide with compact equipment, but hydraulic fluid should be kept clean for
> truly dependable operation.

I have 240k + miles on MY '96 camry. Brakes were changes twicw, never
changed the brake fluid.

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