Broken E-Brake line on a 91 Camry

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 22 Feb 2006, 10:17 pm   #1 (permalink)
x.helix@gmail.com
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Broken E-Brake line on a 91 Camry

Hey,

I currently own a '91 Camry 3SFE automatic w/o ABS and 300,100 miles on
it. Yes, that's the correct miles.

My E-Brake line broke around the rear-passenger side. Any idea on how
much should such a procedure would cost to replace that?

Another question I have is if there's anything I should watch out for
on an old engine like mine? It still has a stock engine, transmission,
struts(unfortunately they're worn out but will change in future), and
ignition coil. Thanks in advance.

Helix

  Reply With Quote
Old 23 Feb 2006, 04:18 pm   #2 (permalink)
m Ransley
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: Broken E-Brake line on a 91 Camry

with 300000 you must be watching things pretty well. I would worry about
brake and fuel lines rusting through, mine did and I got into an
accident. Hoses can break if old. Check you timing old belts stretch
that retards timing and looses power and mpg, my 91 lost 4 mpg on 4
degree retard. But with 300+ you should be telling us what to do.

  Reply With Quote
Old 24 Feb 2006, 07:17 am   #3 (permalink)
Jason James
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: Broken E-Brake line on a 91 Camry


<x.helix@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1140668273.057388.292860@i40g2000cwc.googlegr oups.com...
> Hey,
>
> I currently own a '91 Camry 3SFE automatic w/o ABS and 300,100 miles on
> it. Yes, that's the correct miles.
>
> My E-Brake line broke around the rear-passenger side. Any idea on how
> much should such a procedure would cost to replace that?
>
> Another question I have is if there's anything I should watch out for
> on an old engine like mine? It still has a stock engine, transmission,
> struts(unfortunately they're worn out but will change in future), and
> ignition coil. Thanks in advance.
>
> Helix


As Mark says, that is high mileage and as such you need to watch for
inidications of engine and to a lessor extent transmission problems,
especially excessive oil-leaks, and, if you intend to do long trips in the
car, the condition of coolant hoses.

Also inspect the inside of each wheel for signs of haudralic (brake) fluid
loss from leaking brake parts. Make sure the brake pedal is reasonabley firm
and not spongey. It should not sink slowly to the floor or lose pedal height
on constant application.

One can spend a lot of money on older hi-mlieage cars which wont necessarily
be worthy of the extra cost, especially if its a town car only.

If the temperature gauge stays steady without any changes in indication once
the engine is up to temperature, then its a fair bet the radiator is not
clogged and fans are working OK.

The suspension and steering should be checked out for any excessive wear.

The E-brake is operated by cables or steel multi-string wires. If one has
snapped, its a relatively easy matter to replace it. One from a breakers
yard would probably do the job. It's usually an easy job. If you cant see
what's involved in replacing the broken cable from inspecting the car from
underneath, either get a w/shop manual or get the job done.

Jason


  Reply With Quote
Old 24 Feb 2006, 08:57 am   #4 (permalink)
m Ransley
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: Broken E-Brake line on a 91 Camry

I dont want to scare you but at 300000 alot of components are worn that
could break and leave you stranded, I would be concerned about wheel
bearings, ball joints, CV , you got your money out of it and can keep it
going but at what cost, does the motor burn much oil, a compression test
will indicate life left. My 91 with 100000 can go to 300 after seeing
the pollution test shows basicly a low wear motor, but I live where salt
eats the car.

  Reply With Quote
Old 01 Mar 2006, 01:07 am   #5 (permalink)
x.helix@gmail.com
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: Broken E-Brake line on a 91 Camry

Yea, thanks everyone for your advice. I will get started on checking
for worn hoses. As far as oil burning, it usually needs a quart every
2k miles. Not sure if that's decent or not. How much does a
compression test usually cost? That sounds like a good idea to check
how much life it has left. To be honest /w u guys, the car's been in
the family for about 10 years so I guess you can say it's sedimental
value. In other words, I dont mind spending a few hundred or even a
thousand if necessary. My temp guage works fine as does my radiator
since that has been recently replaced. When I drive in outdoor temps
of 32 or lower, the engine gets soo cold, the guage goes right to the
bottom and therefore shifts from 4th gear to 3rd. Please correct me if
I got the gear order wrong. It goes from overdrive to non-overdrive.
Is that normal? Once again, thanks everyone for your
advice/suggestions.

Helix

  Reply With Quote
Old 01 Mar 2006, 06:11 am   #6 (permalink)
m Ransley
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: Broken E-Brake line on a 91 Camry

If it isnt leaking it is burning it, near the end of life.

  Reply With Quote
Old 01 Mar 2006, 10:09 am   #7 (permalink)
Jason James
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: Broken E-Brake line on a 91 Camry


<x.helix@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1141196837.290652.33370@j33g2000cwa.googlegro ups.com...
Yea, thanks everyone for your advice. I will get started on checking
for worn hoses. As far as oil burning, it usually needs a quart every
2k miles.

While a pint every 1000 miles is starting to be a little heavy for a modern
engine, it may still mean the engine has a couple of years left in it before
it starts to display other wear problems. Having said that, unfortunately
from what I've read here, Oxygen sensors can suffer from carbon build-up in
the exhaust, so if your car is still returning about 22 mpg around town and
30 ish on the hiway, the O2 sensor is probably OK.

Putting heavier grade oil or viscosity enhancers in the existing oil is not
a good idea IMO as other areas of the engine which are not worn as much will
suffer. Also its wise to change the oil and filter at shorter intervals, say
2000 miles, to stop the oil from becoming overloaded with contaminants due
wear. Once an engine is worn, a viscous cycle can start if the owner still
changes the oil at longer intervals. Basically the premature dirty oil
accelerates engine wear and can produce sludge, especially if the t/stat is
allowing the engine to run too cold.


Not sure if that's decent or not. How much does a
compression test usually cost?

Not much. It takes about 20 minutes to do. Its of limited use as we already
know the oil-rings and possibly bore-wear in the cylinders are not like new.
That test will help in determining how much blow-by is occuring (gas
escaping past the compression rings into the sump/crankcase. A blowby check
which can be done by removing the PCV-valve *once the engine is hot*, and
observing any fumes coming out of the cam-cover. If the fumes are heavy,
then the expexted life of the engine is reduced. In heavy fuming motors, the
pistons can overheat on long trips causing the alloy they're made of to
change the piston-bore clearance in extreme cases. If the fuming is hard to
see, then its not that bad.

That sounds like a good idea to check
how much life it has left. To be honest /w u guys, the car's been in
the family for about 10 years so I guess you can say it's sedimental
value. In other words, I dont mind spending a few hundred or even a
thousand if necessary. My temp guage works fine as does my radiator
since that has been recently replaced. When I drive in outdoor temps
of 32 or lower, the engine gets soo cold, the guage goes right to the
bottom and therefore shifts from 4th gear to 3rd.

That indicates the thermostat is not regulating coolant temperature
properly. I 'd spend the money on a Toyota replacement t/stat as some of the
cheaper ones are a bit of a toss-up. I've had 2 such aftermarket t/stats
fail to open. One did this after initially working OK. A properly working
t/stat will control coolant flow so the engine temp reaches normal despite
below freezing teps. It will take a little longer though.

Please correct me if
I got the gear order wrong. It goes from overdrive to non-overdrive.
Is that normal? Once again, thanks everyone for your
advice/suggestions.

Sounds correct. The transmission blocks Odrive until proper engine temp is
achieved. A higher revving motor (due to being in 3rd rather than ODrive)
will heat-up faster.

Jason


  Reply With Quote

Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:24 pm.

Attribution:
Autoblog
Powered by Yahoo Answers



ToyotaLexusForum.com is an unofficial community for car enthusiasts. ToyotaLexusForum.com is not affiliated with Toyota Motor Corporation in any way.
Toyota Motor Corporation does not sponsor, support, or endorse ToyotaLexusForum.com in any way.
Copyright/trademark/sales mark infringements are not intended or implied.