question about struts: 97-01 camry

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02 Mar 2006, 11:05 am   #1 (permalink)
onehappymadman@yahoo.com
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default question about struts: 97-01 camry

What exactly is the problem with the 97-01 generation of camry struts?

Are these McPherson struts? How could they be bad? Were they
incorrectly installed? Was it a bad batch?

  Reply With Quote
Old 02 Mar 2006, 08:04 pm   #2 (permalink)
johngdole@hotmail.com
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: question about struts: 97-01 camry

The strut mounts don't look any different from say a Monroe. But the
internal metal/rubber configuration or material composition may be
different or were badly made. TSBs were out for these mounts. When they
go bad, the mounts may or may not take out the struts because they
can't hold the struts straight as originally designed.

That's why I recommend Monroe mounts because they are easy to find,
carry a lifetime warranty, and come with new bearings.

That's what happens when the lowest bidder without enough experience
got into play. Your previous owner should have gotten them replaced for
free under warranty.

If you think the problem is solved by the 2002 generation, wait till
you own one of these. Go with Monroe mounts, I'd say.

SU001-06 REAR SUSPENSION THUMP NOISE
2/21/2006 - 2004 2006 model year Toyota Camry LE and XLE vehicles
(North American Produced).

SU002-06 REAR SUSPENSION THUMP NOISE
2/21/2006 - 2004 2006 model year Toyota Solara vehicles.

SU004-05 FRONT SUSPENSION TICK NOISE
12/16/2005 - 2004, 2005, 2006 model year Toyota Sienna vehicles

  Reply With Quote
Old 02 Mar 2006, 10:07 pm   #3 (permalink)
m Ransley
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: question about struts: 97-01 camry

My 91 went hard at 60000m , The Monroe Sensatrac I put on were
defective, Rock hard at 10f, My bad luck.

  Reply With Quote
Old 03 Mar 2006, 01:07 am   #4 (permalink)
onehappymadman@yahoo.com
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: question about struts: 97-01 camry


m Ransley wrote:
> My 91 went hard at 60000m , The Monroe Sensatrac I put on were
> defective, Rock hard at 10f, My bad luck.


What struts does Toyota put on its cars? KYB? McPherson? I like the
feel of the ride on my '99 Camry, I just don't care for the squeak.
What kind of strut would have the feel of the original struts on the
'99 Camry?

  Reply With Quote
Old 03 Mar 2006, 01:48 am   #5 (permalink)
johngdole@hotmail.com
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: question about struts: 97-01 camry

I heard about Monroe Sensatrac production quality these days. The
Reflex replaces these and for some reason is cheaper (see NAPA prices).
But have not used them for a while. Monroes are on the soft side for
me.

Try the new slightly stiffer Gabriel Ultras with 9 stages of damping
that's inertia sensitive. See the G-Force story video on
www.gabriel.com. But the Ultras are harder to find than Monroes but
will work with Monroe strut mounts. Monroes are at every street corner.

Of course, older Camrys get to have the excellent Bilsteins. But these
performance struts are pretty stiff for most drivers. These really
don't cost that much more.

All Monroes and Gabriels have lifetime warranties. Good deals if you do
your own work.

Toyotas nowadays should come with KYBs ("Keep Your Bilsteins'). KYBs
GR2s are inexpensive struts and priced accordingly ($69-79, inserts
$45). I don't care for these struts because they don't have advanced
automatic inertia sensing valves as in the Ultra or Reflex.

  Reply With Quote
Old 03 Mar 2006, 01:59 am   #6 (permalink)
mrdarrett@gmail.com
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: question about struts: 97-01 camry


johngdole@hotmail.com wrote:
> I heard about Monroe Sensatrac production quality these days. The
> Reflex replaces these and for some reason is cheaper (see NAPA prices).
> But have not used them for a while. Monroes are on the soft side for
> me.
>
> Try the new slightly stiffer Gabriel Ultras with 9 stages of damping
> that's inertia sensitive. See the G-Force story video on
> www.gabriel.com. But the Ultras are harder to find than Monroes but
> will work with Monroe strut mounts. Monroes are at every street corner.
>
> Of course, older Camrys get to have the excellent Bilsteins. But these
> performance struts are pretty stiff for most drivers. These really
> don't cost that much more.


By "older" do you mean '92-96 Camry? Are these the KYBs? Which model
number / type?

I asked my wife which ride she likes better, and she said she likes the
feel of our '96 camry, with 132k miles on it. Personally I like the
stiffer feel of the '99 camry (with 66k miles on it)

> All Monroes and Gabriels have lifetime warranties. Good deals if you do
> your own work.
>
> Toyotas nowadays should come with KYBs ("Keep Your Bilsteins'). KYBs
> GR2s are inexpensive struts and priced accordingly ($69-79, inserts
> $45). I don't care for these struts because they don't have advanced
> automatic inertia sensing valves as in the Ultra or Reflex.


  Reply With Quote
Old 03 Mar 2006, 05:44 pm   #7 (permalink)
Zaner
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: question about struts: 97-01 camry

I have put on 4 new Monroe sensa tracs, and they are working great...
a bit harder ride than the old worn down stock ones. The problem
with my 97 were front strut mounts. I replaced them with a revised
Toyota design that fit the 97.

The Monroes have a lifetime warranty.

On Thu, 2 Mar 2006 22:07:02 -0600, ransley@webtv.net (m Ransley)
wrote:

>My 91 went hard at 60000m , The Monroe Sensatrac I put on were
>defective, Rock hard at 10f, My bad luck.

  Reply With Quote
Old 03 Mar 2006, 07:27 pm   #8 (permalink)
johngdole@hotmail.com
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: question about struts: 97-01 camry

No, KYBs (jokingly called: "Keep Your Bilsteins" in the car enthusiasts
circle) are low-end struts with simple valving. They have better AGX
struts that are adjustable. But not much to be proud of.

Bilsteins struts are available as aftermarket replacements for Camrys.
Toyota can't afford to put Bilsteins on at the factory, but Mercedes,
BMW, and Audi do. These are made by ThyssenKrupp Bilstein, a world
reknowned suspension parts maker: see www.bilstein.com

96 struts should be soft by now as after 50K miles, you'd loose much of
the damping ability in a typical strut. The car turns to a "boat" with
decreased pitch and lateral stability.

However, modern struts now use what's termed inertia or "velocity
sensitive valve" and use multiple stages of valves (typically 9-10) to
automatically adjust to different road conditions. With these
"intelligent" struts, you'll get softer ride on local streets and
precise handling, say cranking over to the highway exit (not that we
recommend it). Examples are the Gabriel Ultras (2003 Editor's Award,
Popular Mechanics) and Monroe Reflex (or the older Sensatracs ~1999).

Some companies try to pass orfice valves as velocity sensitive, because
an orfice valve offers higher resistence as piston travels faster. But
this is *not* what we mean by intelligent valving.


Check www.gabriel.com the G-Force Story video under "Our Products".

Excerpt from an Advanced Auto Parts article:
http://www.advanceautoparts.com/engl...0001101vv.html

Smart Valving
For years, motorcycle front forks have moved either faster or slower
based upon road conditions. Early automotive adaptations of this
philosophy were electronically controlled "active" suspension systems
in Formula 1 cars and exotic sports cars such as the Lotus Esprit. A
more mass-marketable mutation was driver-controlled adjustable valving,
such as the Rancho RS9000 off-road shock (see Photo 2). A dial allows
five different levels of firmness to be selected.

Recent technological advancements now allow automotive shocks to
automatically alter their valving to match road conditions. The two
prominent ways of accomplishing this are through position-sensitivity
or impact/inertia-activation. The Monroe and Rancho divisions of
Tenneco Automotive are pioneers in these areas, and the Edelbrock IAS
shock is another popular example of an impact- or inertia-sensitive
shock.

  Reply With Quote

Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:37 am.

Attribution:
Autoblog
Powered by Yahoo Answers



ToyotaLexusForum.com is an unofficial community for car enthusiasts. ToyotaLexusForum.com is not affiliated with Toyota Motor Corporation in any way.
Toyota Motor Corporation does not sponsor, support, or endorse ToyotaLexusForum.com in any way.
Copyright/trademark/sales mark infringements are not intended or implied.