auto-rx and distributor O-ring

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Old 22 Mar 2006, 10:31 am   #1 (permalink)
mrdarrett@gmail.com
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Default auto-rx and distributor O-ring

I went ahead and placed an order for a couple bottles of Auto-RX.
We'll see what it picks up...

I'm wondering also if the Auto-Rx would repair the leaky distributor
O-ring (which is leaking oil). Any thoughts on this?

I'm not comfortable with the idea of changing the ($3) distributor
O-ring myself - never done timing before, etc. It's about a $100 job
for my local mechanic...

But if the Auto-Rx can fix my O-ring, so much the better...

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Old 23 Mar 2006, 01:57 am   #2 (permalink)
bauz
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Default Re: auto-rx and distributor O-ring

I replaced the O-ring on my 1991, 4 cyl, more than 2 months ago, and so far
no leaks. The job was not complicated, and did not require any special
tools.
1. The most difficult part is to clean the area before you start. Before
this leak began, my engine was completely dry I want it back this way,
therefore I cleaned everything from the bottom up, including a tooth brush
where needed. It would make your job much easier. I used engine degreaser
and a paint brush to apply it, because I didn't want it to reach any
rubber parts.

2. Not mandatory - I rotated the engine to TDC before I started: I heard
about people who tried this job, and at the end the engine did not start,
therefore I assumed that in the worst case at least I would know that the
rotor should point to wire #1. It also gives a more confident feeling
during the assembly.

3. Disconnect the negative battery cable. Side note: Make sure you have
metric tools. Some bolts are smaller than 9mm (I can't remember if it was
7 or 8mm).

4. The most important step: After everything is clean and shiny, mark the
position of the distributor on the engine head and valve cover. Out of 3
methods I tried: tape, scratch and paint, I found that a drop of whiteout,
that spread on the 2 parts, is the easiest reference point during the
assembly. You can also add a scratch mark just to be safe

5. Move away the air duct. Is held by two metal bands (I am not sure what
is the proper name) that has a screw that release their grip. It will make
the access much easier.

6. disconnect the wires connected to the distributor.

7. The distributor cap is held by 3 bolt: one on the top-left, and two on
the bottom. This is where step #1 becomes important because its hard to
find those bolts. I used a mirror.

8. The distributor is held by 2 bolts: top-left, and bottom-middle. After
removing those bolts, you will be able to pull the distributor out.

9. verify that there is no oil in the coil area (under the rotor). If
there is, it would be a good chance to clean it while the distributor is
out and you don't need to bend down to reach it.

10. Removing the old ring - do not use any metallic sharp objects. Find a
plastic sharp object (I used a plastic scrapper) to pull the ring out of
the groove, and then cut it. Don't waste your time (like me) trying to
pull it out. Mine was very dry and hard, and its cross-section was more
rectangular than round.

11. Put motor oil on the new ring, and it would slide easily to the
groove.

12. Put everything back, with extra precision when positioning and
tightening the distributor bolts. It might be also a good opportunity to
replace the rotor with a new one.


I was planning on borrowing a timing light from a co-worker for a final
fine tunning, but my MPG is about 25 on my daily commute to work (no
highways), so I don't believe that I can improve it anymore.

My mechanic wanted $55 for this job (S. California), but beside saving the
money I enjoyed doing the job my self, having a clean engine and knowing
that there are no scratches on the shaft. I am pretty sure that it would
have not been this way if a mechanic did the job, trying to finish in less
than 20 minutes.

I hope this info would help, and good luck if you decide to do it
yourself. If someone else have any comments, or you notice that I forgot
something, please correct me.

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Old 23 Mar 2006, 06:12 am   #3 (permalink)
m Ransley
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Default Re: auto-rx and distributor O-ring

Leaking O rings usualy mean oil in the distributor, when that happens
the coil is contaminated and it shorts out when humid after startup.
Clean the inside of distributor and the coil good with alcohol

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Old 23 Mar 2006, 08:45 am   #4 (permalink)
Daniel
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Default Re: auto-rx and distributor O-ring

couldn't hurt, but better to replace -- the amount of oil (and auto-rx)
reaching that area is quite small
auto-rx reducing oil seal hardness is more oriented to seals like the
crankshaft seals that are constantly exposed to oil.
If you follow bauz's excellent and complete description you should be
fine.
I definitely recommend using a timing light to check timing when done
though, personally I found it difficult to get the distributor back
exactly to the degree position when removed.
You use a paper clip at the DLC (underhood data link connector) to
temporarily disable the electronic advance. E1 and Te1 - I think. Quite
simple really.
Just remove the air box for better access, and use a shop light.
Once you learn to do your own service and maintenance work, both you
and the car will be better for it - not to mention the cost savings.
Seems to me, the labor savings can be used to replace associated parts
to keep everything in top condition, and you can set aside time to do
the work carefully rather than trying to make quicker work to get to
the next vehicle to increase your earnings.

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Old 23 Mar 2006, 10:30 am   #5 (permalink)
mrdarrett@gmail.com
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Default Re: auto-rx and distributor O-ring


Daniel wrote:
> couldn't hurt, but better to replace -- the amount of oil (and auto-rx)
> reaching that area is quite small
> auto-rx reducing oil seal hardness is more oriented to seals like the
> crankshaft seals that are constantly exposed to oil.
> If you follow bauz's excellent and complete description you should be
> fine.
> I definitely recommend using a timing light to check timing when done
> though, personally I found it difficult to get the distributor back
> exactly to the degree position when removed.
> You use a paper clip at the DLC (underhood data link connector) to
> temporarily disable the electronic advance. E1 and Te1 - I think. Quite
> simple really.
> Just remove the air box for better access, and use a shop light.
> Once you learn to do your own service and maintenance work, both you
> and the car will be better for it - not to mention the cost savings.
> Seems to me, the labor savings can be used to replace associated parts
> to keep everything in top condition, and you can set aside time to do
> the work carefully rather than trying to make quicker work to get to
> the next vehicle to increase your earnings.



Ok, thanks all for the excellent advice.

Funny, my Haynes doesn't seem to mention the distributor at all.

I remember my dad had a timing light - I'll see if he still has it...

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Old 23 Mar 2006, 10:34 am   #6 (permalink)
mrdarrett@gmail.com
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Default Re: auto-rx and distributor O-ring


mrdarr...@gmail.com wrote:
> Daniel wrote:
> > couldn't hurt, but better to replace -- the amount of oil (and auto-rx)
> > reaching that area is quite small
> > auto-rx reducing oil seal hardness is more oriented to seals like the
> > crankshaft seals that are constantly exposed to oil.
> > If you follow bauz's excellent and complete description you should be
> > fine.
> > I definitely recommend using a timing light to check timing when done
> > though, personally I found it difficult to get the distributor back
> > exactly to the degree position when removed.
> > You use a paper clip at the DLC (underhood data link connector) to
> > temporarily disable the electronic advance. E1 and Te1 - I think. Quite
> > simple really.
> > Just remove the air box for better access, and use a shop light.
> > Once you learn to do your own service and maintenance work, both you
> > and the car will be better for it - not to mention the cost savings.
> > Seems to me, the labor savings can be used to replace associated parts
> > to keep everything in top condition, and you can set aside time to do
> > the work carefully rather than trying to make quicker work to get to
> > the next vehicle to increase your earnings.

>
>
> Ok, thanks all for the excellent advice.
>
> Funny, my Haynes doesn't seem to mention the distributor at all.
>
> I remember my dad had a timing light - I'll see if he still has it...



Wow look what I found!

http://www.turboninjas.com/camry/ig.pdf

I feel more confident about this procedure now. Either this weekend or
next, as time permits...

Thanks again all.

Mike Darrett

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