Noisy valves

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 12 Apr 2006, 10:26 pm   #1 (permalink)
90camrydx
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Noisy valves

I have a 1990 DX with the 3SFE engine. It has a lot of valvetrain
noise, so I removed the valve cover and everything looks ok (not
broken). I checked the valve clearance and that's where I have my
question. How much pressure should I use to try to get the feeler
gauge under the cam? All of the intake valves are so worn that I can
fit a .036" feeler gauge under it even though max spec is .011". Even
with the biggest shim toyota makes, my valves won't be in spec. Could
I have a lot of buildup on my valve seats causing excessive clearance?
Anyone with experience have any suggestions?

  Reply With Quote
Old 13 Apr 2006, 08:06 am   #2 (permalink)
Jason James
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: Noisy valves


"90camrydx" <camerondawes@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1144898811.538044.22630@i39g2000cwa.googlegro ups.com...
> I have a 1990 DX with the 3SFE engine. It has a lot of valvetrain
> noise, so I removed the valve cover and everything looks ok (not
> broken). I checked the valve clearance and that's where I have my
> question. How much pressure should I use to try to get the feeler
> gauge under the cam? All of the intake valves are so worn that I can
> fit a .036" feeler gauge under it even though max spec is .011". Even
> with the biggest shim toyota makes, my valves won't be in spec. Could
> I have a lot of buildup on my valve seats causing excessive clearance?
> Anyone with experience have any suggestions?


The build-up is not likely. Usually the valves will pocket slightly at very
high mileage while at the same time, some equal but compensating wear occurs
in the overhead gear (cam lobes and valve follower) bring clearance back to
something near normal. 36 thou sounds very wide. How is the rest of the
engine? Has it high miles?

Jason


  Reply With Quote
Old 13 Apr 2006, 09:42 am   #3 (permalink)
90camrydx
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: Noisy valves

The car has 209k miles. I just bought it to fix it up and sell it. I
paid $450 and the car, other than the valve noise is in very good
condition. Is it possible that I'm just forcing the feeler gauge in
too hard, actually compressing the spring a little? I'm trying to
avoid pulling the head if possible, but will if I have too.

  Reply With Quote
Old 13 Apr 2006, 11:42 am   #4 (permalink)
Daniel
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: Noisy valves

Yes, I have a suggestion. Don't pull the heads just yet.
If you're showing .036" clearance instead of .012 and couldn't even
purchase a large enough shim, I suspect something else is going on.
My guess - just a guess, but I'd try this first, is that you have
carbon built up on the valve faces from the prior owner perhaps idling
excessively or never getting the engine up to high speed for 200,000
miles.
Normally I would recommend Red Line complete fuel system cleaner,
because it gently and safely and continuously removes carbon - but it
takes a long time, like up to 10,000 miles, and you say you're just
fixing up the car for a quick sale.
So here's my recommendation.
There's an old mechanics trick that many people hold in high regard.
Actually you have two choices.
Seafoam or distilled water.
You can find Seafoam on the Internet or at NAPA stores and I think I
also saw some at AutoZone. Seafoam was developed to clean outboard two
stroke boat engines fouled with carbon and reportedly does a great job.
Just follow directions. Something like pour it into the intake on a
fully warmed engine at fast idle until the engine dies then let it sit
for around 10 minutes. Then restart and ignore the immense cloud of
billowing smoke at the exhaust, and drive the car until the smoke
clears up.
Method two is using plain water, which people have said works equally
well without the smoke. Seafoam's MSDS sheets show light oil and naptha
and despite their claims wasn't entirely persuaded this is completely
safe for the O2 sensor, whereas with plain water, no contamination
concern.
Same idea, with the engine hot at fast idle slowly pour water into the
intake, keeping the engine from stalling, probably a little less than
one quart.
If you have a lot of carbon build up, be careful about overheating the
catalytic converter. Some have said it can glow orange or red from
being overloaded with the exiting carbon - but they're designed to
operate at high temperature, so should be no harm, just let it cool a
while afterwards. Others have said they found a small pile of carbon
below the tail pipe afterward.
Caution: Note well --- do_not_ pour water too quickly because there is
a risk of "hydrolocking" the engine if you flood it with water filling
the cylinders with an incompressible liquid you can do engine damage --
so just trickle the water in slowly and there is no risk of hydrolock.
You are essentially steam cleaning the engine, and supposedly you are
cleaning it chemically as well it is said the carbon in the engine
combines easily with the oxygen in the water.
So by either method you should wind up with combustion chambers that
are "squeaky" clean.
I found the easy way to inject water into the throttle body, was to use
a garden sprayer I had in the garage. Had a translucent plastic two
gallon bottle with a pump to pressurize and then spray through a
nozzle, so I just sprayed a small stream of water into the intake and
white steam came out the exhaust. The catalytic converter did not
overheat, and I did not find any carbon at the tail pipe, but had
already been using Red Line, and valve clearances were in spec.

  Reply With Quote
Old 13 Apr 2006, 12:11 pm   #5 (permalink)
90camrydx
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: Noisy valves

I'll give that a try today. Thanks for the suggestion. I had heard of
this procedure before to clean up Jeep valves, and also read of some
people using atf to clean the valves. It's definitely worth a try.
Thanks again.

  Reply With Quote
Old 13 Apr 2006, 06:44 pm   #6 (permalink)
90camrydx
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: Noisy valves

So I tried the water trick, and believe it or not most of my clearances
are now around .015-.025, well within where they can be shimmed.
Thanks for the help. I just finished measuring my shims and will be
headed to the stealership tomorrow.

  Reply With Quote
Old 14 Apr 2006, 01:06 am   #7 (permalink)
johngdole@hotmail.com
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: Noisy valves

I've always heard the benefits of this "steam cleaning" and a good
description of how people can do that here. But that's a lot of carbon
build up!

  Reply With Quote
Old 14 Apr 2006, 12:48 pm   #8 (permalink)
Jason James
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: Noisy valves


"90camrydx" <camerondawes@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1144971877.827919.255290@e56g2000cwe.googlegr oups.com...
> So I tried the water trick, and believe it or not most of my clearances
> are now around .015-.025, well within where they can be shimmed.
> Thanks for the help. I just finished measuring my shims and will be
> headed to the stealership tomorrow.


I learnt something then. The stellite (or similar metal used in aluminium
heads) seats must be very heat resistant, plus the valve heads similarly so.
Glad the situation improved.

Jason


  Reply With Quote
Old 14 Apr 2006, 01:38 pm   #9 (permalink)
mrdarrett@gmail.com
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: Noisy valves

Is the water trick recommended for high mileage vehicles in general?
I've got 135k miles on my '96 camry... I work only 3 miles away, and
drive home for lunch to boot.

  Reply With Quote
Old 14 Apr 2006, 10:09 pm   #10 (permalink)
Jason James
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: Noisy valves


<mrdarrett@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1145039896.413209.32860@i39g2000cwa.googlegro ups.com...
> Is the water trick recommended for high mileage vehicles in general?
> I've got 135k miles on my '96 camry... I work only 3 miles away, and
> drive home for lunch to boot.


Mines the same,..a '96 with city miles on it 174,000ks. Its a bit noisy in
the overhead too,..I might dribble a slight amount of water in its intake
and see if things quieten down.

Hasten to add, the water is minimal. I'll get a squirter trigger bottle and
use that to introduce H2O into the TB.

Jason (we are always learning,..just slow down with age)


  Reply With Quote

Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:40 am.

Attribution:
Autoblog
Powered by Yahoo Answers



ToyotaLexusForum.com is an unofficial community for car enthusiasts. ToyotaLexusForum.com is not affiliated with Toyota Motor Corporation in any way.
Toyota Motor Corporation does not sponsor, support, or endorse ToyotaLexusForum.com in any way.
Copyright/trademark/sales mark infringements are not intended or implied.