Rusted fuel line

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06 May 2006, 04:56 pm   #1 (permalink)
m Ransley
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Rusted fuel line

My 91 fuel line is leaking but looking at it to replace the whole line
is difficult because everything is real tight, can a rubber hose be
spliced in safely.

  Reply With Quote
Old 06 May 2006, 10:39 pm   #2 (permalink)
Daniel
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: Rusted fuel line

m Ransley wrote:
> My 91 fuel line is leaking but looking at it to replace the whole line
> is difficult because everything is real tight, can a rubber hose be
> spliced in safely.

============================
Go to http://www.kanolabs.com/ and order a can of Kroil

You might also find it at a gun shop

This is a rust penetrating lubricant that works extremely well.

Used it on the lower flare nut on the fuel filter and it came right
off, but my most remarkable use was the '77 Toyota truck water pump
bolt that broke the head off. Tried banging on the end of the stud to
loosen it and it rang like a bell - so wedded to the iron block. Tried
loosening with vice grips and they just marred the threads. I was
afraid I would just twist off the rest of the bolt, so I tried soaking
in Kroil - nothing to lose, and planned to install the new water pump
without that bolt, using sealer on the gasket.
Weather was rainy so I just sprayed a bit more Kroil every few days for
a week, and on Sunday, sure enough, the bolt came right out with
undamaged threads, so it should work on your fuel lines, too.
I would not suggest using rubber splices on high pressure fuel injected
lines - too much chance for a tiny leak to develop and begin spraying
fuel. With a carburetor, would be fine though - those are low pressure
systems.

  Reply With Quote
Old 07 May 2006, 06:42 am   #3 (permalink)
m Ransley
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: Rusted fuel line

Can I use rubber hose, I would just be easier.

  Reply With Quote
Old 07 May 2006, 08:44 am   #4 (permalink)
Daniel
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: Rusted fuel line

If I were doing it, I would replace the line.

If you're determined to use flexible line - obviously fuel line, not
just a "rubber hose", seems to me you should at least have - don't know
the correct name, that "bulge" that goes in metal line right before the
clamp.

Would think you've got a risk of fire with even a small gas leak.

If you really want to try it, maybe just use a longer hose, and put two
clamps on each end and see if it leaks, but Toyota is generally
designed to work well for the long term, and if you look at the
flexible fuel lines coming off the fuel filter in the engine
compartment they've got those really heavy duty crimped fittings - not
just a simple clamp, so there's probably a reason - like keeping fuel
under pressure from spraying out where you don't want it on a hot
exhaust pipe.

I'm sure the correct answer would be - do it right and replace the
original line, can't be that difficult, especially if you use that
penetrant first on the old fittings.

But this is just a discussion group - you're free to do anything you
wish, dangerous, foolish, wise or otherwise.

  Reply With Quote
Old 07 May 2006, 02:01 pm   #5 (permalink)
Art
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: Rusted fuel line

If engine is fuel injected you are looking at high pressure and using the
wrong line is dangerous.


"Daniel" <nospampls2002@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1147009440.943456.238970@j73g2000cwa.googlegr oups.com...
> If I were doing it, I would replace the line.
>
> If you're determined to use flexible line - obviously fuel line, not
> just a "rubber hose", seems to me you should at least have - don't know
> the correct name, that "bulge" that goes in metal line right before the
> clamp.
>
> Would think you've got a risk of fire with even a small gas leak.
>
> If you really want to try it, maybe just use a longer hose, and put two
> clamps on each end and see if it leaks, but Toyota is generally
> designed to work well for the long term, and if you look at the
> flexible fuel lines coming off the fuel filter in the engine
> compartment they've got those really heavy duty crimped fittings - not
> just a simple clamp, so there's probably a reason - like keeping fuel
> under pressure from spraying out where you don't want it on a hot
> exhaust pipe.
>
> I'm sure the correct answer would be - do it right and replace the
> original line, can't be that difficult, especially if you use that
> penetrant first on the old fittings.
>
> But this is just a discussion group - you're free to do anything you
> wish, dangerous, foolish, wise or otherwise.
>



  Reply With Quote
Old 07 May 2006, 07:18 pm   #6 (permalink)
0_Qed
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: Rusted fuel line

Daniel wrote:
>
> If I were doing it, I would replace the line.


Aye!
With proper, metal 'line'(tube) .


> If you're determined to use flexible line - obviously fuel line, not
> just a "rubber hose", seems to me you should at least have - don't know
> the correct name, that "bulge" that goes in metal line right before the
> clamp.


'ferrule' ??? ... meant for hard anneal tube

'flared' fitted metal tubing( soft anneal ) is more common ,
easier to install 'tite'.
due to the softer tubing formability , as opposed to a harder 'ferrule'
tube.

'Flared' fitting tube, & tube runs, seem to resist vibration better than
'ferrule' fitted_up tubing runs.

> Would think you've got a risk of fire with even a small gas leak.


$3/gal fire.


> If you really want to try it, maybe just use a longer hose, and put two
> clamps on each end and see if it leaks, but Toyota is generally
> designed to work well for the long term, and if you look at the
> flexible fuel lines coming off the fuel filter in the engine
> compartment they've got those really heavy duty crimped fittings - not
> just a simple clamp, so there's probably a reason - like keeping fuel
> under pressure from spraying out where you don't want it on a hot
> exhaust pipe.


Kinda like a 'non' Lucas, non MGB fitting.
<VBG>

> I'm sure the correct answer would be - do it right and replace the
> original line, can't be that difficult, especially if you use that
> penetrant first on the old fittings.


Me?
Invest in a flaring tool set , and roll_cutter ...
I'd roll_cut the tube back to =good= tube metal , re_do the 'flare',
continue the 'run' on with new flares/tube.
Most parts stores sell either the 4' pre_flared tube lengths,
or the soft anneal(for flaring) tube coils.

Rusted thru fuel lines =also= signal
rusted thru brake lines ...
soon to follow.


> But this is just a discussion group - you're free to do anything you
> wish, dangerous, foolish, wise or otherwise.


Damn rite ... err, 'correct' .
<VBG>

............
A blind man, on a galloping horse,
mite think my newly painted wheel covers looked 'great'.

Ed.
  Reply With Quote
Old 13 May 2006, 11:06 am   #7 (permalink)
RichK
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: Rusted fuel line


"m Ransley" <ransley@webtv.net> wrote in message

> Can I use rubber hose, I would just be easier.


I have replaced a part of the return line with rubber. It was in the tank
area on 93 Camry. Could not even see the spot it was leaking from, since it
was in the vertical section.

Did it on a suggestion from an inspection mechanic, so it was OK, at least
in my state.

RichK


  Reply With Quote

Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:11 am.

Attribution:
Autoblog
Powered by Yahoo Answers



ToyotaLexusForum.com is an unofficial community for car enthusiasts. ToyotaLexusForum.com is not affiliated with Toyota Motor Corporation in any way.
Toyota Motor Corporation does not sponsor, support, or endorse ToyotaLexusForum.com in any way.
Copyright/trademark/sales mark infringements are not intended or implied.