Airco

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Old 12 May 2006, 03:21 pm   #1 (permalink)
Bert
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Default Airco

I drive a 99 Camry 2.2i. Today the airco failed. I can feel the increased
load on the car engine but the air doesn't get cold. What would be most
likely thing to look at? Anything I could possibly fix myself?

Thanks,
Bert


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Old 12 May 2006, 03:46 pm   #2 (permalink)
Nobody Important
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Default Re: Airco

Bert wrote:
> I drive a 99 Camry 2.2i. Today the airco failed. I can feel the increased
> load on the car engine but the air doesn't get cold. What would be most
> likely thing to look at? Anything I could possibly fix myself?


I have the same car, and the same problem. I took it to an independent
garage,
who noted that all the refrigerant had escaped. They partially
pressurized the system and injected some dye, hoping to see later where
the dye leaked out. This technique did not work even after two
iterations. There is a better method: an electronic "sniffer" tool -
I'm in the process of finding a garage with this tool.
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Old 12 May 2006, 04:52 pm   #3 (permalink)
m Ransley
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Default Re: Airco

Get it recharged with freon, it may be years before it looses enough to
quit working again.

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Old 12 May 2006, 07:21 pm   #4 (permalink)
Nobody Important
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m Ransley wrote:
> Get it recharged with freon, it may be years before it looses enough to
> quit working again.
>


In Ontario, you can't buy cans of r134a as a mere consumer, you have to
go to a garage. And they're not allowed to add any more than a test
amount until they find the leak. I've thought about just driving to the
States and buying a refill can though.
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Old 12 May 2006, 08:01 pm   #5 (permalink)
mrdarrett@gmail.com
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Nobody Important wrote:
> m Ransley wrote:
> > Get it recharged with freon, it may be years before it looses enough to
> > quit working again.
> >

>
> In Ontario, you can't buy cans of r134a as a mere consumer, you have to
> go to a garage. And they're not allowed to add any more than a test
> amount until they find the leak. I've thought about just driving to the
> States and buying a refill can though.



Careful with that. If you make any mistake, you can freeze off some
fingers.

Co-worker had an aircon repair business; he told me his business
partner lost his fingers (frostbite? amputation?) when the *thought* he
had bled out all the freon, but actually hadn't.

Just something to keep in mind.

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Old 13 May 2006, 08:06 am   #6 (permalink)
Jason James
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"Bert" <nomail@no.com> wrote in message
news:e42qot$l0k$1@news3.zwoll1.ov.home.nl...
> I drive a 99 Camry 2.2i. Today the airco failed. I can feel the increased
> load on the car engine but the air doesn't get cold. What would be most
> likely thing to look at? Anything I could possibly fix myself?
>
> Thanks,
> Bert


The compressor will still load the engine some,..as it may now have air in
the system to pump. The actual fault maybe anything from a failed TR valve
to a holed condensor.
Be careful running the compressor for too long (as in hours) as it may have
lost a lot of oil. The oil stays in suspension in the gas, which is why bad
leaks are accompanyied by a greasy, dirty area around the leak-site.
Any decent automotive AC place should be able to find the problem quickly.
In the "old" days mechanics used a flame to check for leaks. It would change
colour in the presence of refridgerant. Now they have better electronic
sniffers.

Jason


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Old 15 May 2006, 12:32 pm   #7 (permalink)
Travis Jordan
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Default Re: Airco

mrdarrett@gmail.com wrote:
> Co-worker had an aircon repair business; he told me his business
> partner lost his fingers (frostbite? amputation?) when the *thought*
> he had bled out all the freon, but actually hadn't.


Sounds like an urban legend. You'd have to intentionally keep your
fingers in the escaping refrigerant stream for quite a while.


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Old 15 May 2006, 02:04 pm   #8 (permalink)
Bert
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Default Re: Airco

The dealer wants about 180 $ for recharging it, because apparently it needs
to be emptied first.
Refill cans are not available to consumers.

Maybe I'll just roll down the window...

--
> I drive a 99 Camry 2.2i. Today the airco failed. I can feel the increased
> load on the car engine but the air doesn't get cold. What would be most
> likely thing to look at? Anything I could possibly fix myself?




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Old 15 May 2006, 03:32 pm   #9 (permalink)
Jason James
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"Bert" <nomail@no.com> wrote in message
news:e4ajbv$lb5$1@news2.zwoll1.ov.home.nl...
> The dealer wants about 180 $ for recharging it, because apparently it

needs
> to be emptied first.
> Refill cans are not available to consumers.
>
> Maybe I'll just roll down the window...


Airconditioners are a sealed system which has to be very clean, because the
compressor cannot be oil-changed unless the whole system is evacuated then
refilled with new gas and oil. Even tho the system is sealed, they still
include a "drier" cannister to remove any debris which forms due wear. The
tiny orifice (expansion valve seen in the AC plumbing under the hood) which
aids the liquid to gas change of state which removes heat from the car's
interior (via the evaporator inside the car) will not tolerate debris
either.

The compressor compresses cool Freon gas, causing it to become hot,
high-pressure Freon gas This hot gas runs through a set of coils (called the
condensor which lives in front of the radiator) so it can dissipate its
heat, and it condenses into a liquid.
The Freon liquid runs through an expansion valve, and in the process it
evaporates to become cold, low-pressure Freon gas (light blue in the diagram
above).
This cold gas runs through a set of coils (called the evaporator which is
fitted into the car's heater-cooling system under the dashboard) that allow
the gas to absorb heat and cool down the air inside the

To just add refridgerant from a can does not guarentee the best outcome. It
doesn't remove any water or air in the system which reduces its cooling
ability. To maintain a well-functioning AC, will require periodic
servicing. However, unless there has been a leak, most AC systems will
operate well for many years.

Jason


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Old 15 May 2006, 03:47 pm   #10 (permalink)
Travis Jordan
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Default Re: Airco

Jason James wrote:
> The compressor compresses cool Freon gas, causing it to become hot,
> high-pressure Freon gas This hot gas runs through a set of coils


Freon is a registered trademark that only refers to DuPont-branded CFC
refrigerants. The OP's system uses R-134a, branded "SuvaŽ" by DuPont,
"GenetronŽ" by Honeywell, "ForaneŽ" by Arkema, etc.


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