Need new Timing Belt

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Old 24 May 2006, 01:38 pm   #1 (permalink)
David Glass
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Default Need new Timing Belt

My 2000 camry needs a new timing belt...~95K miles. I'm a pretty good home
mechanic. Is this something I can do myself? If so, can anyone recommend
some good literature on the topic? I'm using a Haynes manual and it isn't
as detailed as I would like.

Thank you.


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Old 24 May 2006, 03:24 pm   #2 (permalink)
Daniel
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Default Re: Need new Timing Belt

4 cylinder - 6 cylinder?

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Old 24 May 2006, 04:38 pm   #3 (permalink)
Charlie
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Default Re: Need new Timing Belt

No! Get it done. Preferably find a qualified technician at a local
shop. Or have the dealership do it and pay for whatever they come up
with and use a lot of common sense about the extras. I have written
about this here several times. You need a belt, a water pump, camshaft
bearing(s), some more associated parts. My 2000 4-cyl Camry took the
-said- qualified mechanic about 5 hours. I am a very good driveway
mechanic also, no way I am voluntarily going to touch something that
involved and deeply buried. And I make my living maintaining and
reparing industrial machinery. If you are resident in North Texas and
especially North Dallas check the Texaco at Plano and Campbell.


David Glass wrote:
> My 2000 camry needs a new timing belt...~95K miles. I'm a pretty good home
> mechanic. Is this something I can do myself? If so, can anyone recommend
> some good literature on the topic? I'm using a Haynes manual and it isn't
> as detailed as I would like.
>
> Thank you.
>
>

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Old 24 May 2006, 04:57 pm   #4 (permalink)
David Glass
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Default Re: Need new Timing Belt

4 cylinder!

Thanks.

"Daniel" <nospampls2002@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1148502296.093656.259300@38g2000cwa.googlegro ups.com...
>4 cylinder - 6 cylinder?
>



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Old 24 May 2006, 06:16 pm   #5 (permalink)
Daniel
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Default Re: Need new Timing Belt

It is easier to have someone else replace the timing belt, and the cost
is usually reasonable - it is a very common repair.
However, after reading the newsgroups for a couple of years, as the
mileage for change approached, I leaned toward doing my own work, and
wound up actually having no problem because I was prepared.
I enjoy things like seeing the oil pump gears and discovering the
clearances are excellent
I do have a spare vehicle though - that might make a difference. I did
not finish in one day, but . . . I did some other work also (replaced
engine oil pan gasket and transmission pan gasket). To me that's one of
the benefits, you can take the labor charges saved and replace more
parts like the missing timing cover gasket sections.
There are a couple of reasons you might want to do your own repairs.
1) It can be very rewarding to understand how everything goes together.
2) The owner can often take more time than the mechanic paid by job or
hourly rate. For example I clean every bolt and surface thoroughly
prior to re assembly.
3) Almost without exception, every time I do work that has been
previously done by another mechanic I find errors were made.
For example during this work, I found two stripped transmission pan
bolts, a chipped crankshaft pulley (from prying instead of using a
puller), thermostat installed incorrectly (jiggle valve), any many
components over tightened.
If you're careful and understand what you're doing, you may actually do
a better job.

My notes:
6/12/04: Major Servicing: 120,124 miles:
Replace: timing belt, crankshaft oil seal, oil pump oil seal, oil pump
O-ring, camshaft oil seal, idler bearing, idler tensioner bearing,
timing cover gasket set, valve cover gasket, ck valve clearances, PCV
valve, PCV valve grommet, oil cap gasket, distributor O-ring,
distributor cap, rotor, distributor packing, spark plug wires, spark
plugs, fuel filter, air filter, ck. battery, oil pan gasket,
transmission pan gasket, water pump, thermostat, radiator cap, gas cap,
differential service, engine moving control rod, accessory drive belts:
power steering pump, A/C - alternator, alternator brushes, ck. chassis
mounting bolt torque, set ignition timing
===============
I would say the sticking points where the tricks of the trade can help
a lot are
1) removing the crankshaft bolt - I used an electric impact gun - later
acquired air powered
2) removing the engine brace - secret: do this after removing the
crankshaft pulley so you can reach bolts from beneath - makes it much,
much simpler
3) camshaft seal - the cam turns at one half engine speed, so this seal
wears more slowly, but is helpful to have the special installation tool
I purchased which makes installation a breeze
4) belt tensioning - you need to replace the tensioning spring with
new, but do not rely upon that spring - you need to loosen the
tensioner bearing and exert a lot of force to tension the belt. I used
a hook tool to pull up, you could also use a pry bar. After exerting
lots of pressure to pre-stretch the timing belt, then release it
letting the tensioning spring maintain the correct tension as you
tighten the tensioner bearing.
Most people will have others work on their car, and that's perfectly
fine, but my Camry is actually improving over time with increased
smoothness, power and comfort over prior years as maintenance and
repair work continues - replacing the axles and brakes for example.
The first item I replaced was the radiator. So as you do more, you
learn more.
I do not believe, generally, the four cylinder Camry is difficult to
work on, as long as you go step by step and work carefully.
I do recommend getting the factory service manual set though - have
found it very authoritative, helpful, and easy to follow. Keep checking
eBay.

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Old 25 May 2006, 08:01 am   #6 (permalink)
Daniel
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Default Re: Need new Timing Belt

Charlie wrote:
"My 2000 4-cyl Camry took the
-said- qualified mechanic about 5 hours."
=======================
Since dealers often offer timing belt specials for around $100
(excluding any additional parts), seems fairly clear that the standard
labor rate for this job would be considerably less than 5 hours.

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Old 25 May 2006, 08:03 am   #7 (permalink)
Daniel
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Default Re: Need new Timing Belt

Not your model year, but you may find this link helpful:

http://www.turboninjas.com/camry/


Check the 5S-FE engine section - should be quite similar to yours.

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Old 25 May 2006, 01:35 pm   #8 (permalink)
Charlie
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Default Re: Need new Timing Belt

When I did the repair or time sensitive maintenance for the belt and
water pump I got three estimates. One from a dealer in the area and two
from independent shops. The initial estimated cost was within a few
dollars of each other. My experience with the dealers in this area is
that repairs at the dealership always have additional items in a new
'group' which drives the price up by multiples of the original quote.
The little shop that did the work stood by its labor cost. I did pay
for additional parts but the shop would have eaten the additional cost.

Daniel wrote:
> Charlie wrote:
> "My 2000 4-cyl Camry took the
> -said- qualified mechanic about 5 hours."
> =======================
> Since dealers often offer timing belt specials for around $100
> (excluding any additional parts), seems fairly clear that the standard
> labor rate for this job would be considerably less than 5 hours.
>

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Old 25 May 2006, 02:38 pm   #9 (permalink)
RickC
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Default Re: Need new Timing Belt

I'm planning to change my timing belt also. I have a 2000 Camry
v6(1MZFE) with 95k miles.
It looks like a difficult project for a beginner so I'm taking my time
to try to learn as much as I can before starting.
I'm worried about making mistakes like screwing up the timing,
scratching the bore while trying to remove the oil seals or breaking a
siezed water pump bolt.
I've come across a couple of tools that should make the job easier.
Since we have a couple of Camry's and Sienna's in the family, I think
the tools might be worth the cost. I'd like to know how folks got
through these steps without the specialized tools.

Step 1: SP Tool 96800 to help remove the Camshaft bolt. The tool
allows you to hold the sprocket stationary with one hand while you turn
the bolt with the other. Haynes manual suggests removing the valve
cover to allow you to hold the camshaft with a wrench. Seems like
removing the valve covers just to hold the spockets stationary would be
a real pain... especially the cover towards the firewall.

Step 2: SP Tool 64300 to help keep the crankshaft stationary while you
loosen the crankshaft pulley bolt. Haynes manual suggests wedging a
screwdriver in the fly-wheel gear teeth. Are these the same teeth that
the starter motor uses?

Step 3: "Shaft In Oil Seal puller"-Lisle 58430 to remove the old cam
and crank oil seals. This tool is not too expensive and it looks like
the right application.

Step 4: SP Tool 63800 to install the new Camshaft oil seal. I can
probably use a large socket or pipe and hammer but there is not a lot
of room around the rear(right) cam sprocket.

What do you use to measure the tension on the accessory belts?

My mechanic will do the entire job(timing belt,idler pulleys,cam
seals,crank seal,water pump,coolant flush and thermostat) for $550.
Once I have the tools, I can probably do the job for about $200 in
parts and have the satisfaction of doing the job myself.

RickC

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Old 25 May 2006, 07:42 pm   #10 (permalink)
Gordon
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Default Re: Need new Timing Belt

You can do the job at least as well as my Toyota dealer does it.
Recently I read the Toyota manual for my '95 V6 and concluded
that only a highly trained and equipped mechanic can handle the job.
To sweeten the deal the service manager allowed me to observe.
His top mechanic completed the job in thirty (30) minutes flat, as he
explained the procedure to me. When he positioned the crankshaft by
cranking the front camshaft with the old belt still in place, I nearly
fainted. He never once used a torque wrench, and I'm sure the bolt in
the crankshaft is over-torqued by his airgun. Read the service
manual, work slowly, and you'll do a better job than a dealer. The job
is relatively safe, as you don't have to crawl under the car or run the
engine.
-Gordon

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