Request for guidelines on cleaning sticky idle air control valve.

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Old 01 Jun 2006, 12:05 am   #1 (permalink)
taovan
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Default Request for guidelines on cleaning sticky idle air control valve.

Hi All,
I have a 94 and a 99 Camry and both have sticky idle air control valve.
I have been consistently replacing them every 18 months. Then I found
out about this group and learned that there was alternative solution to
the problem. Many suggested that cleaning the IAC valve worked for
them, using Redline Fuel System Cleaner would help reduce carbon
build-up, and adding TriFlow would help lubricate the valve better.
Here are my questions. Can someone show me a picture of IAC valve and
its location under the hood since I am a complete auto-illiterate? Do
I have to use air valve cleaner or carb. cleaner will work just fine?
Can someone share his/her experience with Redline Fuel System Cleaner?
Even the dealer recommends using fuel system cleaner every two months
as a way to reduce carbon build-up.


Ivan

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Old 01 Jun 2006, 11:27 am   #2 (permalink)
Daniel
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Default Re: Request for guidelines on cleaning sticky idle air control valve.

taovan wrote:
> Hi All,
> I have a 94 and a 99 Camry and both have sticky idle air control valve.
> I have been consistently replacing them every 18 months. Then I found
> out about this group and learned that there was alternative solution to
> the problem. Many suggested that cleaning the IAC valve worked for
> them, using Redline Fuel System Cleaner would help reduce carbon
> build-up, and adding TriFlow would help lubricate the valve better.
> Here are my questions. Can someone show me a picture of IAC valve and
> its location under the hood since I am a complete auto-illiterate? Do
> I have to use air valve cleaner or carb. cleaner will work just fine?
> Can someone share his/her experience with Redline Fuel System Cleaner?
> Even the dealer recommends using fuel system cleaner every two months
> as a way to reduce carbon build-up.
>
>
> Ivan

======================================
If you go to Redline's Internet site they have detailed technical
information regarding the fuel system cleaner including graphs and apx.
4 pages of text. Should answer any question you may have.
All you really need is Tri-Flow for a newer IAC valve. Just spray some
into the opening on a cold engine.
How does the novice find the IAC air intake?
Easy.
Open the hood.
You should see the battery right in front.
Just behind that is the air filter enclosure.
Follow the air tube back as it curves around to the left.
It terminates at the throttle body.
You'll see a wheel with cables going to it in front. On the '94 it's
just behind the distributor that has the spark plug wires. The wheel
with cables is the throttle valve that moves when you press on the gas
pedal.
The purpose of the idle air control valve is to route air past the
closed throttle valve at idle, so the air intake is in front of the
throttle valve inside the throttle body.
You need a 10mm wrench to loosen the clamp holding the air intake hose
- a fairly large diameter black plastic hose that connects to the
throttle body.
You're going to have to turn that hose clamp bolt a lot, so it is
easier if you have a ratchet wrench or GearWrench, but actually any
10mm wrench will work.
After the clamp is loosened, use both hands to simultaneously pull back
and twist and wiggle the connection to release the air hose. Then pull
it over to the right (windshield) side of the throttle body to get it
out of your way temporarily.
Then look inside the throttle body.
Right in front, at the bottom, you will see a rectangular shaped
opening. That's the air intake for the idle control valve and that's
where you spray a small amount of Tri-Flow.
That's it.
You're done.
Pull back on the air intake tube and press it back into place.
Tighten the hose clamp.
It doesn't have to be over tightened, just firm - snug - use light
pressure on the end of the wrench until you feel it stop turning, then
don't force it, just apply moderate pressure such that you've reached
the natural holding force of the fastener.
One can of Tri-Flow will last for years, and one application should be
good for around a year.
Perhaps after you've accomplished this, you may be emboldened to try
other maintenance or repair procedures, but at least you'll have this
one done.
======================
By the way, if you really want to see a picture, the Haynes repair
manual for your '94 has a photograph in the Fuel section of someone
spraying carburetor cleaner into the throttle body so you should be
able to see the IAC intake opening there.

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Old 01 Jun 2006, 11:46 am   #3 (permalink)
marvinshos@yahoo.com
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Default Re: Request for guidelines on cleaning sticky idle air control valve.

A similar procedure has worked for me at least 3 times. I have used
brake cleaner with no side effects.


Daniel wrote:
> taovan wrote:
> > Hi All,
> > I have a 94 and a 99 Camry and both have sticky idle air control valve.
> > I have been consistently replacing them every 18 months. Then I found
> > out about this group and learned that there was alternative solution to
> > the problem. Many suggested that cleaning the IAC valve worked for
> > them, using Redline Fuel System Cleaner would help reduce carbon
> > build-up, and adding TriFlow would help lubricate the valve better.
> > Here are my questions. Can someone show me a picture of IAC valve and
> > its location under the hood since I am a complete auto-illiterate? Do
> > I have to use air valve cleaner or carb. cleaner will work just fine?
> > Can someone share his/her experience with Redline Fuel System Cleaner?
> > Even the dealer recommends using fuel system cleaner every two months
> > as a way to reduce carbon build-up.
> >
> >
> > Ivan

> ======================================
> If you go to Redline's Internet site they have detailed technical
> information regarding the fuel system cleaner including graphs and apx.
> 4 pages of text. Should answer any question you may have.
> All you really need is Tri-Flow for a newer IAC valve. Just spray some
> into the opening on a cold engine.
> How does the novice find the IAC air intake?
> Easy.
> Open the hood.
> You should see the battery right in front.
> Just behind that is the air filter enclosure.
> Follow the air tube back as it curves around to the left.
> It terminates at the throttle body.
> You'll see a wheel with cables going to it in front. On the '94 it's
> just behind the distributor that has the spark plug wires. The wheel
> with cables is the throttle valve that moves when you press on the gas
> pedal.
> The purpose of the idle air control valve is to route air past the
> closed throttle valve at idle, so the air intake is in front of the
> throttle valve inside the throttle body.
> You need a 10mm wrench to loosen the clamp holding the air intake hose
> - a fairly large diameter black plastic hose that connects to the
> throttle body.
> You're going to have to turn that hose clamp bolt a lot, so it is
> easier if you have a ratchet wrench or GearWrench, but actually any
> 10mm wrench will work.
> After the clamp is loosened, use both hands to simultaneously pull back
> and twist and wiggle the connection to release the air hose. Then pull
> it over to the right (windshield) side of the throttle body to get it
> out of your way temporarily.
> Then look inside the throttle body.
> Right in front, at the bottom, you will see a rectangular shaped
> opening. That's the air intake for the idle control valve and that's
> where you spray a small amount of Tri-Flow.
> That's it.
> You're done.
> Pull back on the air intake tube and press it back into place.
> Tighten the hose clamp.
> It doesn't have to be over tightened, just firm - snug - use light
> pressure on the end of the wrench until you feel it stop turning, then
> don't force it, just apply moderate pressure such that you've reached
> the natural holding force of the fastener.
> One can of Tri-Flow will last for years, and one application should be
> good for around a year.
> Perhaps after you've accomplished this, you may be emboldened to try
> other maintenance or repair procedures, but at least you'll have this
> one done.
> ======================
> By the way, if you really want to see a picture, the Haynes repair
> manual for your '94 has a photograph in the Fuel section of someone
> spraying carburetor cleaner into the throttle body so you should be
> able to see the IAC intake opening there.


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Old 01 Jun 2006, 11:47 am   #4 (permalink)
marvinshos@yahoo.com
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: Request for guidelines on cleaning sticky idle air control valve.

A similar procedure has worked for me at least 3 times. I have used
brake cleaner with no side effects.


Daniel wrote:
> taovan wrote:
> > Hi All,
> > I have a 94 and a 99 Camry and both have sticky idle air control valve.
> > I have been consistently replacing them every 18 months. Then I found
> > out about this group and learned that there was alternative solution to
> > the problem. Many suggested that cleaning the IAC valve worked for
> > them, using Redline Fuel System Cleaner would help reduce carbon
> > build-up, and adding TriFlow would help lubricate the valve better.
> > Here are my questions. Can someone show me a picture of IAC valve and
> > its location under the hood since I am a complete auto-illiterate? Do
> > I have to use air valve cleaner or carb. cleaner will work just fine?
> > Can someone share his/her experience with Redline Fuel System Cleaner?
> > Even the dealer recommends using fuel system cleaner every two months
> > as a way to reduce carbon build-up.
> >
> >
> > Ivan

> ======================================
> If you go to Redline's Internet site they have detailed technical
> information regarding the fuel system cleaner including graphs and apx.
> 4 pages of text. Should answer any question you may have.
> All you really need is Tri-Flow for a newer IAC valve. Just spray some
> into the opening on a cold engine.
> How does the novice find the IAC air intake?
> Easy.
> Open the hood.
> You should see the battery right in front.
> Just behind that is the air filter enclosure.
> Follow the air tube back as it curves around to the left.
> It terminates at the throttle body.
> You'll see a wheel with cables going to it in front. On the '94 it's
> just behind the distributor that has the spark plug wires. The wheel
> with cables is the throttle valve that moves when you press on the gas
> pedal.
> The purpose of the idle air control valve is to route air past the
> closed throttle valve at idle, so the air intake is in front of the
> throttle valve inside the throttle body.
> You need a 10mm wrench to loosen the clamp holding the air intake hose
> - a fairly large diameter black plastic hose that connects to the
> throttle body.
> You're going to have to turn that hose clamp bolt a lot, so it is
> easier if you have a ratchet wrench or GearWrench, but actually any
> 10mm wrench will work.
> After the clamp is loosened, use both hands to simultaneously pull back
> and twist and wiggle the connection to release the air hose. Then pull
> it over to the right (windshield) side of the throttle body to get it
> out of your way temporarily.
> Then look inside the throttle body.
> Right in front, at the bottom, you will see a rectangular shaped
> opening. That's the air intake for the idle control valve and that's
> where you spray a small amount of Tri-Flow.
> That's it.
> You're done.
> Pull back on the air intake tube and press it back into place.
> Tighten the hose clamp.
> It doesn't have to be over tightened, just firm - snug - use light
> pressure on the end of the wrench until you feel it stop turning, then
> don't force it, just apply moderate pressure such that you've reached
> the natural holding force of the fastener.
> One can of Tri-Flow will last for years, and one application should be
> good for around a year.
> Perhaps after you've accomplished this, you may be emboldened to try
> other maintenance or repair procedures, but at least you'll have this
> one done.
> ======================
> By the way, if you really want to see a picture, the Haynes repair
> manual for your '94 has a photograph in the Fuel section of someone
> spraying carburetor cleaner into the throttle body so you should be
> able to see the IAC intake opening there.


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Old 08 Jun 2006, 10:07 pm   #5 (permalink)
taovan
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: Request for guidelines on cleaning sticky idle air control valve.

Hi,
Thanks a for the advice! It is very simple procedure. I have
applied Tri-Flow (one spay) on both of my cars 4 days ago. RedLine Fuel
System Cleaner is on its way. The 94 car is working fine. Its intial
RPM increases by 100. However, the 99 car stalled twice in the past
two days during cold starts. Could it be not having enough TriFlow?
Thanks!


Ivan
Daniel wrote:
> taovan wrote:
> > Hi All,
> > I have a 94 and a 99 Camry and both have sticky idle air control valve.
> > I have been consistently replacing them every 18 months. Then I found
> > out about this group and learned that there was alternative solution to
> > the problem. Many suggested that cleaning the IAC valve worked for
> > them, using Redline Fuel System Cleaner would help reduce carbon
> > build-up, and adding TriFlow would help lubricate the valve better.
> > Here are my questions. Can someone show me a picture of IAC valve and
> > its location under the hood since I am a complete auto-illiterate? Do
> > I have to use air valve cleaner or carb. cleaner will work just fine?
> > Can someone share his/her experience with Redline Fuel System Cleaner?
> > Even the dealer recommends using fuel system cleaner every two months
> > as a way to reduce carbon build-up.
> >
> >
> > Ivan

> ======================================
> If you go to Redline's Internet site they have detailed technical
> information regarding the fuel system cleaner including graphs and apx.
> 4 pages of text. Should answer any question you may have.
> All you really need is Tri-Flow for a newer IAC valve. Just spray some
> into the opening on a cold engine.
> How does the novice find the IAC air intake?
> Easy.
> Open the hood.
> You should see the battery right in front.
> Just behind that is the air filter enclosure.
> Follow the air tube back as it curves around to the left.
> It terminates at the throttle body.
> You'll see a wheel with cables going to it in front. On the '94 it's
> just behind the distributor that has the spark plug wires. The wheel
> with cables is the throttle valve that moves when you press on the gas
> pedal.
> The purpose of the idle air control valve is to route air past the
> closed throttle valve at idle, so the air intake is in front of the
> throttle valve inside the throttle body.
> You need a 10mm wrench to loosen the clamp holding the air intake hose
> - a fairly large diameter black plastic hose that connects to the
> throttle body.
> You're going to have to turn that hose clamp bolt a lot, so it is
> easier if you have a ratchet wrench or GearWrench, but actually any
> 10mm wrench will work.
> After the clamp is loosened, use both hands to simultaneously pull back
> and twist and wiggle the connection to release the air hose. Then pull
> it over to the right (windshield) side of the throttle body to get it
> out of your way temporarily.
> Then look inside the throttle body.
> Right in front, at the bottom, you will see a rectangular shaped
> opening. That's the air intake for the idle control valve and that's
> where you spray a small amount of Tri-Flow.
> That's it.
> You're done.
> Pull back on the air intake tube and press it back into place.
> Tighten the hose clamp.
> It doesn't have to be over tightened, just firm - snug - use light
> pressure on the end of the wrench until you feel it stop turning, then
> don't force it, just apply moderate pressure such that you've reached
> the natural holding force of the fastener.
> One can of Tri-Flow will last for years, and one application should be
> good for around a year.
> Perhaps after you've accomplished this, you may be emboldened to try
> other maintenance or repair procedures, but at least you'll have this
> one done.
> ======================
> By the way, if you really want to see a picture, the Haynes repair
> manual for your '94 has a photograph in the Fuel section of someone
> spraying carburetor cleaner into the throttle body so you should be
> able to see the IAC intake opening there.


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Old 09 Jun 2006, 12:05 pm   #6 (permalink)
Daniel
Guest
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Default Re: Request for guidelines on cleaning sticky idle air control valve.

taovan wrote:
> Hi,
> Thanks a for the advice! It is very simple procedure. I have
> applied Tri-Flow (one spay) on both of my cars 4 days ago. RedLine Fuel
> System Cleaner is on its way. The 94 car is working fine. Its intial
> RPM increases by 100. However, the 99 car stalled twice in the past
> two days during cold starts. Could it be not having enough TriFlow?
> Thanks!

=====================
Try some Berryman B-12 Chemtool spray on the '99 IAV valve while it is
stumbling at cold idle.
If that doesn't clean it, you'll probably have to replace the valve.
Check the manual for all the adjustments you can do with the throttle
body removed:
http://www.turboninjas.com/camry/
=================
I started using Tri-Flow because the problem returned even with a new
IAC valve installed, and that has solved it for me so far.
I took apart the old valve just to see how it was put together. There
were some scrape marks on the rotating drum, so that's why it occurred
to me that there is no lubrication for that part, and I began use of
the Tri-Flow.

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