98 Camry Spark plug change

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Old 07 Jul 2006, 01:02 pm   #1 (permalink)
Grip
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Default 98 Camry Spark plug change

Hi guys\gals!

My girlfriend just acquired a 98 camry 3.0 V6 freebee. I was going to
change the plugs, as I do this myself on our Tacomas, but need advice on
getting at the 3 in the rear? Thanks in advance if you can help,
Mike


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Old 07 Jul 2006, 06:49 pm   #2 (permalink)
johngdole@hotmail.com
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Default Re: 98 Camry Spark plug change

There are many posts on how to do this. But you don't really have to
remove the intake manifold as the manual suggests. You should be able
to reach all plugs from the driver side. And by using the spark plug
socket and either a 3" or 6" extension depending on which cylinder, you
should be able to get them out. You don't need a universal joint
either.

Use NGK iridium (BKR6EIX-11, or better: BKR6EKPB-11) if you can. Local
NAPA sells them at a good price around $6-8 each I think. Great plugs.
I'd stay away from Densos over the counter. Don't use standard plugs
because of the short service life.

www.ngksparkplugs.com

G-Power Platinum BKR6EGP 7092 0.044
Laser Platinum BKR6EKPB-11 * # 3452 0.044
Iridium IX BKR6EIX-11 3764 0.044
# Original Equipment


Grip wrote:
> Hi guys\gals!
>
> My girlfriend just acquired a 98 camry 3.0 V6 freebee. I was going to
> change the plugs, as I do this myself on our Tacomas, but need advice on
> getting at the 3 in the rear? Thanks in advance if you can help,
> Mike


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Old 07 Jul 2006, 09:03 pm   #3 (permalink)
Stubby
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Default Re: 98 Camry Spark plug change

I have 150,000+ miles on my original plugs. Why should I change them?
I go 29.4 MPG on a recent trip. '05 v4 LE


johngdole@hotmail.com wrote:
> There are many posts on how to do this. But you don't really have to
> remove the intake manifold as the manual suggests. You should be able
> to reach all plugs from the driver side. And by using the spark plug
> socket and either a 3" or 6" extension depending on which cylinder, you
> should be able to get them out. You don't need a universal joint
> either.
>
> Use NGK iridium (BKR6EIX-11, or better: BKR6EKPB-11) if you can. Local
> NAPA sells them at a good price around $6-8 each I think. Great plugs.
> I'd stay away from Densos over the counter. Don't use standard plugs
> because of the short service life.
>
> www.ngksparkplugs.com
>
> G-Power Platinum BKR6EGP 7092 0.044
> Laser Platinum BKR6EKPB-11 * # 3452 0.044
> Iridium IX BKR6EIX-11 3764 0.044
> # Original Equipment
>
>
> Grip wrote:
>> Hi guys\gals!
>>
>> My girlfriend just acquired a 98 camry 3.0 V6 freebee. I was going to
>> change the plugs, as I do this myself on our Tacomas, but need advice on
>> getting at the 3 in the rear? Thanks in advance if you can help,
>> Mike

>

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Old 08 Jul 2006, 11:32 am   #4 (permalink)
Wolfgang
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Default Re: 98 Camry Spark plug change

Because the EPA highway rating is 34 MPG --- you'd gain near 5 MPG and less
polluting. 100k is about limit and they aren't that expensive or hard to
change in the 4 cylinder.

"Stubby" <William.Plummer-NOSPAM-@alum.mit.edu> wrote in message
news:yoCdnWZIad7RjzLZnZ2dnUVZ_vudnZ2d@comcast.com. ..
>I have 150,000+ miles on my original plugs. Why should I change them? I go
>29.4 MPG on a recent trip. '05 v4 LE
>
>
> johngdole@hotmail.com wrote:
>> There are many posts on how to do this. But you don't really have to
>> remove the intake manifold as the manual suggests. You should be able
>> to reach all plugs from the driver side. And by using the spark plug
>> socket and either a 3" or 6" extension depending on which cylinder, you
>> should be able to get them out. You don't need a universal joint
>> either.
>>
>> Use NGK iridium (BKR6EIX-11, or better: BKR6EKPB-11) if you can. Local
>> NAPA sells them at a good price around $6-8 each I think. Great plugs.
>> I'd stay away from Densos over the counter. Don't use standard plugs
>> because of the short service life.
>>
>> www.ngksparkplugs.com
>>
>> G-Power Platinum BKR6EGP 7092 0.044
>> Laser Platinum BKR6EKPB-11 * # 3452 0.044
>> Iridium IX BKR6EIX-11 3764 0.044
>> # Original Equipment
>>
>>
>> Grip wrote:
>>> Hi guys\gals!
>>>
>>> My girlfriend just acquired a 98 camry 3.0 V6 freebee. I was going
>>> to
>>> change the plugs, as I do this myself on our Tacomas, but need advice on
>>> getting at the 3 in the rear? Thanks in advance if you can help,
>>> Mike

>>



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Old 08 Jul 2006, 11:37 am   #5 (permalink)
johngdole@hotmail.com
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Default Re: 98 Camry Spark plug change

Most plugs make the engine run rough long before then. The 05 may have
been equipped with the Laser Iridium, typically with 0.7mm center
electrode and a platinum ground pad, good for 120K-miles. If that's the
case, as I said, the likes of NGK Laser Iridium are excellent.

But center electrode wears and, the plug internals degrade. Unless you
put the plug on a scope to determine its firing voltage or do a
calibrated test to see if you can get higher MPGs with a set of newer
plugs or measure the combustion cleanliness you won't be able to tell
unless things are way out of wack.

I personally won't wait until things run rough or are out of wack. And
I change timing belts at 60K miles for a few hours of weekend time,
even if 90K or more are specified.


Stubby wrote:
> I have 150,000+ miles on my original plugs. Why should I change them?
> I go 29.4 MPG on a recent trip. '05 v4 LE
>


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Old 09 Jul 2006, 10:54 am   #6 (permalink)
Stubby
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Default Re: 98 Camry Spark plug change

I slipped in my post. I drive a 1995 v4 LW, not 2005. I never have
seen mileage greater than 31 and even that was probably a slip of the
numbers. EPA figures are whacky from what I see. The Prius was
supposed to get 56 MPG but in actual tests got 34, about the same as a
Neon. So who's right?

Wolfgang wrote:
> Because the EPA highway rating is 34 MPG --- you'd gain near 5 MPG and less
> polluting. 100k is about limit and they aren't that expensive or hard to
> change in the 4 cylinder.
>
> "Stubby" <William.Plummer-NOSPAM-@alum.mit.edu> wrote in message
> news:yoCdnWZIad7RjzLZnZ2dnUVZ_vudnZ2d@comcast.com. ..
>> I have 150,000+ miles on my original plugs. Why should I change them? I go
>> 29.4 MPG on a recent trip. '05 v4 LE
>>
>>
>> johngdole@hotmail.com wrote:
>>> There are many posts on how to do this. But you don't really have to
>>> remove the intake manifold as the manual suggests. You should be able
>>> to reach all plugs from the driver side. And by using the spark plug
>>> socket and either a 3" or 6" extension depending on which cylinder, you
>>> should be able to get them out. You don't need a universal joint
>>> either.
>>>
>>> Use NGK iridium (BKR6EIX-11, or better: BKR6EKPB-11) if you can. Local
>>> NAPA sells them at a good price around $6-8 each I think. Great plugs.
>>> I'd stay away from Densos over the counter. Don't use standard plugs
>>> because of the short service life.
>>>
>>> www.ngksparkplugs.com
>>>
>>> G-Power Platinum BKR6EGP 7092 0.044
>>> Laser Platinum BKR6EKPB-11 * # 3452 0.044
>>> Iridium IX BKR6EIX-11 3764 0.044
>>> # Original Equipment
>>>
>>>
>>> Grip wrote:
>>>> Hi guys\gals!
>>>>
>>>> My girlfriend just acquired a 98 camry 3.0 V6 freebee. I was going
>>>> to
>>>> change the plugs, as I do this myself on our Tacomas, but need advice on
>>>> getting at the 3 in the rear? Thanks in advance if you can help,
>>>> Mike

>
>

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Old 10 Jul 2006, 02:42 pm   #7 (permalink)
aiuser
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Default Re: 98 Camry Spark plug change


Grip wrote:
> Hi guys\gals!
>
> My girlfriend just acquired a 98 camry 3.0 V6 freebee. I was going to
> change the plugs, as I do this myself on our Tacomas, but need advice on
> getting at the 3 in the rear? Thanks in advance if you can help,
> Mike


I have done it recently on my 2000 V6. Having read a number of posts
on this board regarding what's the best way to change the back 3 spark
plugs. I used a combination of 3 inch extensions (2), 6 inch extension

(1), a universal joint and a swivel wrench, I managed to change all of
them. My suggestion is to find the combination so that your wrench can

turn. This require some trial and error. Use your left hand to
provide support for the extensions and right hand to turn it. The only

thing that I have to disconnect is the tube connecting to the PCV valve

so as to provide more space to access the plug closest to the passenger

side.

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Old 10 Jul 2006, 07:18 pm   #8 (permalink)
Don Fearn
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Default Re: 98 Camry Spark plug change

Because "aiuser" <tsiu2k@yahoo.ca> could, he/she/it opin'd:


>I have done it recently on my 2000 V6. Having read a number of posts
>on this board regarding what's the best way to change the back 3 spark
>plugs. I used a combination of 3 inch extensions (2), 6 inch extension
>(1), a universal joint and a swivel wrench, I managed to change all of
>them. My suggestion is to find the combination so that your wrench can
>turn. This require some trial and error. Use your left hand to
>provide support for the extensions and right hand to turn it. The only
>thing that I have to disconnect is the tube connecting to the PCV valve
>so as to provide more space to access the plug closest to the passenger
>side.


Woah; NOW I know why I take my Camry to the dealer for oil changes!

The fact that my son works in the service department helps, but I was
doing that before he was there and giving me a 15% discount on service
fees . . . .

-Don
--
Quid tibi (est) opiniones aliorum
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Old 10 Jul 2006, 08:46 pm   #9 (permalink)
johngdole@hotmail.com
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Default Re: 98 Camry Spark plug change

Those EPA numbers may not reflect the actual driving condition. They
tend to over-estimate, especially for the Prius. But that's being
changed now.

It's hard to say if 29 mpg is good or bad. It depends on a lot of
things like the mix of highway/local driving, tire pressure, type of
gas, etc. People have run 60K-mile timing belts to over 200K miles.
Just because it can be done doesn't mean it's good.


Stubby wrote:
> I slipped in my post. I drive a 1995 v4 LW, not 2005. I never have
> seen mileage greater than 31 and even that was probably a slip of the
> numbers. EPA figures are whacky from what I see. The Prius was
> supposed to get 56 MPG but in actual tests got 34, about the same as a
> Neon. So who's right?


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Old 10 Jul 2006, 11:51 pm   #10 (permalink)
johngdole@hotmail.com
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Default Re: 98 Camry Spark plug change

It's really not as bad as it sounds, compared to some domestic large
displacement V6 and V8's in a passenger car package.

Yes, some prefer the use of universal joints and other widgets. But I
find a standard 3/8 ratchet and socket and both the 3" and 6"
extensions will do fine.

First just try reaching the plug boots, for starters.


Don Fearn wrote:
> Woah; NOW I know why I take my Camry to the dealer for oil changes!
>
> The fact that my son works in the service department helps, but I was
> doing that before he was there and giving me a 15% discount on service
> fees . . . .
>
> -Don
> --
> Quid tibi (est) opiniones aliorum


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