Rust converter: use it on exhaust manifold?

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Old 26 Aug 2006, 03:42 am   #1 (permalink)
geronimo
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Default Rust converter: use it on exhaust manifold?

Its an 88 Camry. As you can imagine, it is pretty rusted (have the
shield off now). It's got 200 K miles on it. From the exhaust pipe
coupling on back, the exhaust is not in bad shape. Was wondering if I
can get more life out of it by applying that rust converter treatment
that turns rust black? How long after applying it would I have let the
car sit? Geronimo
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Old 26 Aug 2006, 07:04 am   #2 (permalink)
Wolfgang
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Default Re: Rust converter: use it on exhaust manifold?

The exhaust manifold get too hot for it to really rust away - plus its thick
compared to exhasut pipes. The thin coating ot current curs protects it
pretty much from further rusting. The "Extend" type treaters probably would
not hurt it but at 200k how much longer you looking to extend its life? I'd
let it sit overnight - and it may smell when you get it hot the first time.

"geronimo" <Jamesw@grandecom.net> wrote in message
news:q020f29i6lcbcg2vk5b9dn43eq4m1dveg4@4ax.com...
> Its an 88 Camry. As you can imagine, it is pretty rusted (have the
> shield off now). It's got 200 K miles on it. From the exhaust pipe
> coupling on back, the exhaust is not in bad shape. Was wondering if I
> can get more life out of it by applying that rust converter treatment
> that turns rust black? How long after applying it would I have let the
> car sit? Geronimo



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Old 26 Aug 2006, 10:47 am   #3 (permalink)
Daniel
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Default Re: Rust converter: use it on exhaust manifold?

geronimo wrote:
> Its an 88 Camry. As you can imagine, it is pretty rusted (have the
> shield off now).

=========
Put the heat shield back on.
Do not coat the exhaust manifold with anything.
The exhaust manifold is cast iron - thick enough that surface oxidation
(rust) has no effect.
However, I have an older (1977) Toyota truck with an earlier heat
shield design without slots for venting which caused the exhaust
manifold to crack from lack of ability to dissipate heat (so I replaced
manifold and added later design slotted heat shield).
During operation, the exhaust manifold can glow orange hot - so I would
not apply anything extraneous to the surface.

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Old 27 Aug 2006, 12:46 pm   #4 (permalink)
geronimo
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Default Re: Rust converter: use it on exhaust manifold?


Yea, not a good idea. Thanks, geronimo



On 26 Aug 2006 08:47:12 -0700, "Daniel" <nospampls2002@yahoo.com>
wrote:

>geronimo wrote:
>> Its an 88 Camry. As you can imagine, it is pretty rusted (have the
>> shield off now).

>=========
>Put the heat shield back on.
>Do not coat the exhaust manifold with anything.
>The exhaust manifold is cast iron - thick enough that surface oxidation
>(rust) has no effect.
>However, I have an older (1977) Toyota truck with an earlier heat
>shield design without slots for venting which caused the exhaust
>manifold to crack from lack of ability to dissipate heat (so I replaced
>manifold and added later design slotted heat shield).
>During operation, the exhaust manifold can glow orange hot - so I would
>not apply anything extraneous to the surface.


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