99 camry how to check shocks

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Old 12 Sep 2006, 04:52 pm   #1 (permalink)
wp51dos
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Default 99 camry how to check shocks

99 camry how to check shocks

v6 160,000 miles origional shocks

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Old 12 Sep 2006, 07:29 pm   #2 (permalink)
Daniel
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Default Re: 99 camry how to check shocks

wp51dos wrote:
> 99 camry how to check shocks
>
> v6 160,000 miles origional shocks

=============================
A lot of people will tell you that simply based on mileage they're worn
out.

I prefer a more quantitative approach - like how could they be tested.

Here is a response from another Group some time ago (not my words):

Best test for a shock (short of dyno-testing) is to drive it fairly
aggressively - but carefully - over rough road. If the car remains
under
control, then the shocks are, likely, okay.

If one end or the other tends to "wash out", then new shocks (or
struts)
are indicated.
==================================
The "test rig" that Jason refers to is known as a shock absorber
dynamometer.....and I own one.

Basically, it gives you a graph of the pressures produced as compared
to
the shaft velocities at which they are produced when the shock is moved
at
different speeds - ranging from a shaft velocity of one-inch-per-second
to
20 i.p.s.

Basically, a shock that creates 200 pounds of resistance pressure while

moving at a shaft velocity of five i.p.s will better control a car
than a
shock that only produces 100 pounds of resistance pressure at the same
shaft velocity.

We use these graphs a bit differently in racing applications to
"fine-tune"
the suspension with shocks, but the above information is pretty much
all
you need to know for standard passenger automobiles....more shock
pressure
at a given shaft velocity controls better than less pressure at the
same
velocity.

When internal valves and springs weaken and wear out (imagine how many
cycles a shock valve control spring experiences in 50,000 miles of
compressing to open and close the valving each time the shaft moves in
or
out) , they allow fluid to pass more easily at lower pressures -
usually
with no external leakage to suggest that any sort of problem exists.

The so-called "bounce test" only tells you if a shock will control a
car
while negotiating "Mickey D" parking lot speed bumps at less than five
mph
with a carload of rug rats and Happy Meals.

"Hand-testing" a shock off the car moves the shaft at a velocity of
approximately one-half i.p.s.

A shock can "feel" good at slow "bounce-test" or "hand-test" speeds of
one
i.p.s. or less because it is only passing fluid through its designed,
low-speed, bleed orifices and/or bypassing the seals, but be a complete

failure at higher shaft velocities once it gets up onto the
valving....sometimes, actually providing less resistance at five i.p.s.

then at "bounce-test" velocities once the valves open up.

On a smooth road, the shocks will likely be working in the 2-6 i.p.s.
shaft
velocity range....which simply cannot be duplicated by bouncing on the
bumper of the car.

Best test for a shock (short of dyno-testing) is to drive it fairly
aggressively - but carefully - over rough road. If the car remains
under
control, then the shocks are, likely, okay.

If one end or the other tends to "wash out", then new shocks (or
struts)
are indicated.

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Old 14 Sep 2006, 09:21 am   #3 (permalink)
wp51dos
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Default Re: 99 camry how to check shocks

thank you for info


Daniel wrote:
> wp51dos wrote:
> > 99 camry how to check shocks
> >
> > v6 160,000 miles origional shocks

> =============================
> A lot of people will tell you that simply based on mileage they're worn
> out.
>
> I prefer a more quantitative approach - like how could they be tested.
>
> Here is a response from another Group some time ago (not my words):
>
> Best test for a shock (short of dyno-testing) is to drive it fairly
> aggressively - but carefully - over rough road. If the car remains
> under
> control, then the shocks are, likely, okay.
>
> If one end or the other tends to "wash out", then new shocks (or
> struts)
> are indicated.
> ==================================
> The "test rig" that Jason refers to is known as a shock absorber
> dynamometer.....and I own one.
>
> Basically, it gives you a graph of the pressures produced as compared
> to
> the shaft velocities at which they are produced when the shock is moved
> at
> different speeds - ranging from a shaft velocity of one-inch-per-second
> to
> 20 i.p.s.
>
> Basically, a shock that creates 200 pounds of resistance pressure while
>
> moving at a shaft velocity of five i.p.s will better control a car
> than a
> shock that only produces 100 pounds of resistance pressure at the same
> shaft velocity.
>
> We use these graphs a bit differently in racing applications to
> "fine-tune"
> the suspension with shocks, but the above information is pretty much
> all
> you need to know for standard passenger automobiles....more shock
> pressure
> at a given shaft velocity controls better than less pressure at the
> same
> velocity.
>
> When internal valves and springs weaken and wear out (imagine how many
> cycles a shock valve control spring experiences in 50,000 miles of
> compressing to open and close the valving each time the shaft moves in
> or
> out) , they allow fluid to pass more easily at lower pressures -
> usually
> with no external leakage to suggest that any sort of problem exists.
>
> The so-called "bounce test" only tells you if a shock will control a
> car
> while negotiating "Mickey D" parking lot speed bumps at less than five
> mph
> with a carload of rug rats and Happy Meals.
>
> "Hand-testing" a shock off the car moves the shaft at a velocity of
> approximately one-half i.p.s.
>
> A shock can "feel" good at slow "bounce-test" or "hand-test" speeds of
> one
> i.p.s. or less because it is only passing fluid through its designed,
> low-speed, bleed orifices and/or bypassing the seals, but be a complete
>
> failure at higher shaft velocities once it gets up onto the
> valving....sometimes, actually providing less resistance at five i.p.s.
>
> then at "bounce-test" velocities once the valves open up.
>
> On a smooth road, the shocks will likely be working in the 2-6 i.p.s.
> shaft
> velocity range....which simply cannot be duplicated by bouncing on the
> bumper of the car.
>
> Best test for a shock (short of dyno-testing) is to drive it fairly
> aggressively - but carefully - over rough road. If the car remains
> under
> control, then the shocks are, likely, okay.
>
> If one end or the other tends to "wash out", then new shocks (or
> struts)
> are indicated.


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Old 14 Sep 2006, 09:16 pm   #4 (permalink)
ACAR
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Default Re: 99 camry how to check shocks


Daniel wrote:
> wp51dos wrote:
> > 99 camry how to check shocks
> >
> > v6 160,000 miles origional shocks

> =============================
> A lot of people will tell you that simply based on mileage they're worn
> out.
>
> I prefer a more quantitative approach - like how could they be tested.
>
> Here is a response from another Group some time ago (not my words):
>
> Best test for a shock (short of dyno-testing) is to drive it fairly
> aggressively - but carefully - over rough road. If the car remains
> under
> control, then the shocks are, likely, okay.
>
> If one end or the other tends to "wash out", then new shocks (or
> struts)
> are indicated.
> ==================================
> snip


Consider a Step 2; test drive a new Camry and drive it aggressively
over the same rough road. Note difference in speed. The new car will be
under control at a higher speed than the car with worn out suspension
parts. You may be surprised just how much faster the new car will run.

It's a safe bet that OEM struts/shocks with 160K miles on them are worn
out.

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Old 14 Sep 2006, 09:55 pm   #5 (permalink)
johngdole@hotmail.com
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Default Re: 99 camry how to check shocks

Check Monroe's FAQ (www.monroe.com/tech_support/tec_faq.asp) and
www.gabriel.com (Shock & Safety 101 tab). These should answer some of
your questions.

Initially I thought Monroe's recommendation of replacement at 50K miles
more of a marketing thing. But after seeing OEM strut degradations
around 50-70K miles I now agree. Often these degradations are so
gradual it's hard to notice.

Since I change my own struts, $250 for all four corners using Gabriel
Ultras are an excellent deal. The stock struts were wimpy during
highway clover-ramp turns even when new. The Ultras are much more
stable and resist leaning much better.

As far as strut dynos go, Bilstein offer the service for $25. Not bad,
but considering what you pay and the time spent to take the assemblies
out, you might as well use the $100 ($25x4) toward new struts.

99 Camrys may have problematic front strut mounts too. So you may have
to replace them when you change the struts.



wp51dos wrote:
> 99 camry how to check shocks
>
> v6 160,000 miles origional shocks


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Old 15 Sep 2006, 01:21 am   #6 (permalink)
sharx35
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Default Re: 99 camry how to check shocks


<johngdole@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1158288904.839941.226490@i42g2000cwa.googlegr oups.com...
> Check Monroe's FAQ (www.monroe.com/tech_support/tec_faq.asp) and
> www.gabriel.com (Shock & Safety 101 tab). These should answer some of
> your questions.
>
> Initially I thought Monroe's recommendation of replacement at 50K miles
> more of a marketing thing. But after seeing OEM strut degradations
> around 50-70K miles I now agree. Often these degradations are so
> gradual it's hard to notice.
>
> Since I change my own struts, $250 for all four corners using Gabriel
> Ultras are an excellent deal. The stock struts were wimpy during
> highway clover-ramp turns even when new. The Ultras are much more
> stable and resist leaning much better.
>
> As far as strut dynos go, Bilstein offer the service for $25. Not bad,
> but considering what you pay and the time spent to take the assemblies
> out, you might as well use the $100 ($25x4) toward new struts.
>
> 99 Camrys may have problematic front strut mounts too. So you may have
> to replace them when you change the struts.


There was nothing wrong with the suspension system in the 99 Camry 6 cyl
models.


>
>
>
> wp51dos wrote:
>> 99 camry how to check shocks
>>
>> v6 160,000 miles origional shocks

>



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Old 15 Sep 2006, 06:28 pm   #7 (permalink)
dbltap
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Default Re: 99 camry how to check shocks

From my reading he was not implying that there is an inherent problem with
the 99 Camry but since this car has 160,000 miles there could very well be a
mount problem.


"sharx35" <sharx35@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:uDrOg.5348$KA6.4647@clgrps12...
>
> <johngdole@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:1158288904.839941.226490@i42g2000cwa.googlegr oups.com...
>> Check Monroe's FAQ (www.monroe.com/tech_support/tec_faq.asp) and
>> www.gabriel.com (Shock & Safety 101 tab). These should answer some of
>> your questions.
>>
>> Initially I thought Monroe's recommendation of replacement at 50K miles
>> more of a marketing thing. But after seeing OEM strut degradations
>> around 50-70K miles I now agree. Often these degradations are so
>> gradual it's hard to notice.
>>
>> Since I change my own struts, $250 for all four corners using Gabriel
>> Ultras are an excellent deal. The stock struts were wimpy during
>> highway clover-ramp turns even when new. The Ultras are much more
>> stable and resist leaning much better.
>>
>> As far as strut dynos go, Bilstein offer the service for $25. Not bad,
>> but considering what you pay and the time spent to take the assemblies
>> out, you might as well use the $100 ($25x4) toward new struts.
>>
>> 99 Camrys may have problematic front strut mounts too. So you may have
>> to replace them when you change the struts.

>
> There was nothing wrong with the suspension system in the 99 Camry 6 cyl
> models.
>
>
>>
>>
>>
>> wp51dos wrote:
>>> 99 camry how to check shocks
>>>
>>> v6 160,000 miles origional shocks

>>

>
>



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Old 15 Sep 2006, 08:51 pm   #8 (permalink)
johngdole@hotmail.com
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Default Re: 99 camry how to check shocks

There were defective mounts installed over a number of years. Goto
autodata.com (part of AutoZone now) and look up the TSB on suspension
mounts.

sharx35 wrote:
> There was nothing wrong with the suspension system in the 99 Camry 6 cyl
> models.


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Old 15 Sep 2006, 09:06 pm   #9 (permalink)
johngdole@hotmail.com
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Default Re: 99 camry how to check shocks

Besides the age of the car on rubber parts the 97-01 strut mounts were
affected by manufacturing defects as described by Toyota TSBs.

I thought they fixed the problems, but then similar TSBs showed up for
02-06 Camrys. So I've been recommending Monroe mounts that come with
new bearings and lifetime warranty.

If you install new struts and rubber spring seats and then hear
squeaks, cluncks and rattles from the front mount area then you know
you have the defective mounts. (BTW, old sway bar bushings also can
squeak). But if you don't, no need to spend more money.


dbltap wrote:
> From my reading he was not implying that there is an inherent problem with
> the 99 Camry but since this car has 160,000 miles there could very well be a
> mount problem.
> >


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Old 17 Sep 2006, 04:39 pm   #10 (permalink)
m Ransley
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Default Re: 99 camry how to check shocks

160000, don`t waste anyones time checking, replace them, you will notice
a major improvement over the junk you now have, I guearnrtee.

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