A/C compressor rebuild

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Old 17 Dec 2006, 05:14 pm   #1 (permalink)
Pszemol
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Default A/C compressor rebuild

Anybody has the access to the 10AP17C compressor rebuild instructions ?

Also I would like to know what is different in the 10AP17C
compressor designed to work with R12 and the same 10AP17C designed
to work with the R134a refridgerant, beside the obvious: top plate
with different hose connectors/sockets ?

I had to replace a compressor in my R134a system and (by accident)
I picked up a compressor with the same model number for R12. During
the repair I have noticed, it had different fittings for R12, not
R134a. I was wondering if - after disassembly, cleaning the old
oil and reassembling it (with the fittings plate moved from the
broken, R134a one) it would work fine with R134a refridgerant ?
I know the oil is different, so it requires flush, but what about
the other parts ? Should I replace all rubber o-rings, too ?
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Old 18 Dec 2006, 01:01 pm   #2 (permalink)
mrdarrett@gmail.com
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Default Re: A/C compressor rebuild


Pszemol wrote:
> Anybody has the access to the 10AP17C compressor rebuild instructions ?
>
> Also I would like to know what is different in the 10AP17C
> compressor designed to work with R12 and the same 10AP17C designed
> to work with the R134a refridgerant, beside the obvious: top plate
> with different hose connectors/sockets ?
>
> I had to replace a compressor in my R134a system and (by accident)
> I picked up a compressor with the same model number for R12. During
> the repair I have noticed, it had different fittings for R12, not
> R134a. I was wondering if - after disassembly, cleaning the old
> oil and reassembling it (with the fittings plate moved from the
> broken, R134a one) it would work fine with R134a refridgerant ?
> I know the oil is different, so it requires flush, but what about
> the other parts ? Should I replace all rubber o-rings, too ?



Any chance of simply getting the R134a compressor?

If you do change O-rings and flush, you might get a working compressor,
but who knows how long it will last?

Just my $0.02

Michael

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Old 18 Dec 2006, 02:11 pm   #3 (permalink)
Pszemol
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Default Re: A/C compressor rebuild

<mrdarrett@gmail.com> wrote in message news:1166468463.155083.130790@48g2000cwx.googlegro ups.com...
> Any chance of simply getting the R134a compressor?
>
> If you do change O-rings and flush, you might get a working compressor,
> but who knows how long it will last?
>
> Just my $0.02


You are correct. The amount of work will not justify "savings".

One more question - do you guys know how much oil stays in the
compressor during "normal handling" of it out of the vehicle ?
Does it easily flow out when it is removed from the car and
put on a shelf of a junkyard ? Or majority of oil stays inside ?

I am not sure how much new oil should I add there to make it happy.
The manual states 140cc, but I assume this is for new, empty compressor.
Adding this much to a used one, with some oil in there would be too much.
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Old 18 Dec 2006, 07:23 pm   #4 (permalink)
EdV
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Default Re: A/C compressor rebuild

My understanding is,(?) that oil should be added whenever you have a
freon charge. Oil will not be left inside but will flow together with
the freon as it escapes.

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Old 19 Dec 2006, 12:50 pm   #5 (permalink)
Pszemol
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Default Re: A/C compressor rebuild

"EdV" <edramirventura@gmail.com> wrote in message news:1166491430.877167.267460@f1g2000cwa.googlegro ups.com...
> My understanding is,(?) that oil should be added whenever you have a
> freon charge. Oil will not be left inside but will flow together with
> the freon as it escapes.


Really ? Where did you get this impression ?

The oil in question is quite thick, like a liquid glycerine or
mineral oil used for baby care Johnson&Johnson
and left alone in the cup does not evaporate on its own...
It could be squirted away with freon if you open the line
abruptly and the gas pressure pushes it out, but when
you release the pressure slowly, by the service ports,
than little oil seem to be lost.
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Old 21 Dec 2006, 10:01 am   #6 (permalink)
Daniel
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Default Re: A/C compressor rebuild

Pszemol wrote:
> The oil in question is quite thick, like a liquid glycerine or
> mineral oil

============
I think you're going to need synthetic oil for 134a.
My understanding of air conditioning is limited but I copied this from
another group:
==============================

>Compressor oil used in R134a system is synthetic whereas R12
>compressor oil is not. Not to be mixed.


Correct. To do the conversion properly you have to take the
compressor out, drain and flush out all the old mineral oil (till the
end level of mineral oil is below roughly 1%), change the fill ports
to the new Quick Connect style, and change all the seals and gaskets
to be compatible with R-134. Then refill the compressor with a PAG
(Polyalkaline Glycol) or POE (Polyolefin Ester) base synthetic oil.
Usually easier to just swap in a factory rebuild compressor that has
already been converted, and you get fresh piston rings too. And you
need to change all the other refrigerant hoses and seals in the AC
system also.

You can get away with just changing the compressor oil, adding the
fill-port adapters and refilling with R-134 - for wide variables of
the term "for a while". It's going to spring a leak somewhere.

To all the R-12 AC car owners out there: Just fix all the leaks and
refill it with R-12 until you just can not get it anymore (or it hits
$100 a pound) it's a whole lot easier and cheaper in the long run.
When you scrap this car and get a new one, that one will use R-134
from the factory.

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Old 24 Dec 2006, 08:42 pm   #7 (permalink)
EdV
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Default Re: A/C compressor rebuild

I get that impression because freon was also used as a cleaning agent
beside being used in airconditioning. Freon was able to clean
chemicals, chemicals that are quite similar to oil. Oil was added in
the system because it was to prevent to much abrasion inside because
pure freon is not good. I really haven't opened up a AC compressor so
I would take your word for it.

On Dec 19, 10:50 am, "Pszemol" <Psze...@PolBox.com> wrote:
> "EdV" <edramirvent...@gmail.com> wrote in messagenews:1166491430.877167.267460@f1g2000cwa.go oglegroups.com...
> > My understanding is,(?) that oil should be added whenever you have a
> > freon charge. Oil will not be left inside but will flow together with
> > the freon as it escapes.Really ? Where did you get this impression ?

>
> The oil in question is quite thick, like a liquid glycerine or
> mineral oil used for baby care Johnson&Johnson
> and left alone in the cup does not evaporate on its own...
> It could be squirted away with freon if you open the line
> abruptly and the gas pressure pushes it out, but when
> you release the pressure slowly, by the service ports,
> than little oil seem to be lost.


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Old 27 Dec 2006, 03:12 am   #8 (permalink)
toyomoho
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Default Re: A/C compressor rebuild


Yes, Freon has been used as a cleaning agent. It worked well. Also as a
coolant for drilling holes and machining.


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