How I Solved My Camry's Stalling Problem

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Old 11 Apr 2007, 12:57 am   #1 (permalink)
mrdarrett@gmail.com
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Default How I Solved My Camry's Stalling Problem

The Problem: About a year ago, my '96 Camry (141,000 miles) would
stall - only when warm, only when approaching a stop light or stop
sign, and only after being driven at least 7 miles. RPMs would
fluctuate between 250 and 750 RPM; throwing the transmission into
Neutral and tapping the gas pedal would help to avoid a stall. If it
did stall, cranking the car could usually revive the engine.

In the past, this only happened about once a month. Didn't bother me
that much. Lately, though, it had begun to stall on any trip longer
than 7 miles. My commute to work is only 3 miles; so, I took my time
trying to figure it out.

The Solution: My EGR Vacuum Modulator needed replacing.

What I Had Tried Before:
o replacing intake air hose (it was cracked and needed replacing
anyway; $90 at the dealership)
o replaced stuck PCV valve (I forget how much)
o changed spark plugs (they were clean; no sign of soot); done myself
o changed leaking distributor O-ring (mechanic did this; about $90 for
the labor)
o tried Tri-Flow Teflon in IAC valve; done myself
o cleaned throttle plate with throttle plate cleaner and a toothbrush;
done myself
o disassembled and cleaned throttle body (with throttle plate cleaner
and a can of compressed air); done myself
o disassembled and cleaned idle air control valve (and stripped a
Pozidrive screw; thank goodness for the Dremel screw extraction
method!); done myself
o changed transmission fluid (thinking it was a stuck shift solenoid);
done myself
o changed coolant sensor ($12 at Autozone); done myself. (Haynes said
to measure the voltage across it; should be 5V. I measured 10V, so
thought this was bad. Guess I was wrong.
o steam-cleaned the inside of the engine by squirting distilled water
into the intake manifold while the engine was running.
o removed and cleaned EGR valve; done myself (had to remove the nut at
the engine; blowtorch method loosened the valve from the pipe)

What Worked: Disconnected my EGR valve, and placed a 3-inch nail in
the vacuum line. Car didn't stall anymore, but I didn't want to risk
the higher engine temperature, and I wasn't too comfortable with the
knowledge I'd fail a smog check. Worked when I had absolutely no
choice though (stalling like crazy on a city street; pulled over, put
the nail in, no problem).

Now that I knew it was the EGR system, I had to narrow it down to: EGR
valve, EGR modulator, vacuum switching valve, or some leaking vacuum
line.

I took out the EGR valve, and cleaned it (twice) with throttle plate
cleaner. It didn't hold vacuum very well (vacuum pump had it losing
pressure slowly), but at least it would spring back to the CLOSED
position fairly quickly.

Took a chance: borrowed the EGR modulator from my wife's '99 Camry
(some research showed the parts are interchangeable), then drove
around with that in my '96 Camry. 30 mile trip; no stall.

Notes: My mechanic said they would charge $85 just to LOOK at the
problem. That got me motivated to disassemble the throttle body and
IAC valve (which the mechanic said was a usual problem with these
Camrys). Ordinarily I wouldn't do that.

Posting here, in the hope this will be of use to someone.

Michael

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Old 11 Apr 2007, 03:49 am   #2 (permalink)
doncee
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Default Re: How I Solved My Camry's Stalling Problem

>
> What Worked: Disconnected my EGR valve, and placed a
> 3-inch nail in the vacuum line. Car didn't stall anymore,
> but I didn't want to risk the higher engine temperature,
> and I wasn't too comfortable with the knowledge I'd fail a
> smog check. Worked when I had absolutely no choice though
> (stalling like crazy on a city street; pulled over, put the
> nail in, no problem).
>
> Now that I knew it was the EGR system, I had to narrow it
> down to: EGR valve, EGR modulator, vacuum switching valve,
> or some leaking vacuum line.
>
> I took out the EGR valve, and cleaned it (twice) with
> throttle plate cleaner. It didn't hold vacuum very well
> (vacuum pump had it losing pressure slowly), but at least
> it would spring back to the CLOSED position fairly quickly.
>
> Took a chance: borrowed the EGR modulator from my wife's
> '99 Camry (some research showed the parts are
> interchangeable), then drove around with that in my '96
> Camry. 30 mile trip; no stall.
>
> Notes: My mechanic said they would charge $85 just to LOOK
> at the problem. That got me motivated to disassemble the
> throttle body and IAC valve (which the mechanic said was a
> usual problem with these Camrys). Ordinarily I wouldn't do
> that.
>
> Posting here, in the hope this will be of use to someone.
>
> Michael
>


Thanks for the post & info. Should be of great value to someone
experiencing similiar probs.
dc
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Old 11 Apr 2007, 08:25 am   #3 (permalink)
EdV
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Default Re: How I Solved My Camry's Stalling Problem

I hear alot of EGR problems, is this something you have to replace
every 100k-150k?? miles? is there anything you can do to prevent
premature failure of EGRs?

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Old 11 Apr 2007, 10:36 am   #4 (permalink)
mrdarrett@gmail.com
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Default Re: How I Solved My Camry's Stalling Problem

On Apr 11, 6:25 am, "EdV" <edramirvent...@gmail.com> wrote:
> I hear alot of EGR problems, is this something you have to replace
> every 100k-150k?? miles? is there anything you can do to prevent
> premature failure of EGRs?



Good question. From what I've read, Toyota seems to design parts
(like radiators) to last only 10 years or so, on the philosophy that,
if it breaks after 10 years, you can't really complain. And compared
to some American cars, I guess they're right...

It seems that the EGR valve might need cleaning every 100k miles or so
(especially considering its job: piping dirty exhaust back into the
intake manifold), but it's really difficult to remove - I had to
remove it from the engine block, and to get there, you have to remove
the air hose and throttle body (or at least I did).

I've also heard that if you fail a smog check, the EGR valve is a
prime suspect.

One hint I had about the EGR modulator was a small spot of black stuff
on the inside filter of the EGR modulator. I found a thread somewhere
on the web that had a picture of a really gray EGR modulator filter -
and someone replied that the EGR modulator had ruptured, piping
exhaust through the filter (which shouldn't happen) - and to replace
the part.

I'm tempted to just go to the local junkyard to find a replacement EGR
modulator - guy quoted me $10. Pretty easy to install, once you've
swapped it out a few times. ;-)

Otherwise, I'd go to www.toyotadiscountparts.com. The part number is
25870-74090. It's about $44 there, but need to order $100 worth of
parts to get the free shipping. Hmm...

Regards,

Michael

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Old 11 Apr 2007, 01:02 pm   #5 (permalink)
James Spencer
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Default Re: How I Solved My Camry's Stalling Problem

<mrdarrett@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1176305807.573461.197450@n76g2000hsh.googlegr oups.com...
> On Apr 11, 6:25 am, "EdV" <edramirvent...@gmail.com> wrote:
>> I hear alot of EGR problems, is this something you have to replace
>> every 100k-150k?? miles? is there anything you can do to prevent
>> premature failure of EGRs?

>
>
> Good question. From what I've read, Toyota seems to design parts
> (like radiators) to last only 10 years or so, on the philosophy that,
> if it breaks after 10 years, you can't really complain. And compared
> to some American cars, I guess they're right...
>
> It seems that the EGR valve might need cleaning every 100k miles or so
> (especially considering its job: piping dirty exhaust back into the
> intake manifold), but it's really difficult to remove - I had to
> remove it from the engine block, and to get there, you have to remove
> the air hose and throttle body (or at least I did).
>
> I've also heard that if you fail a smog check, the EGR valve is a
> prime suspect.
>
> One hint I had about the EGR modulator was a small spot of black stuff
> on the inside filter of the EGR modulator. I found a thread somewhere
> on the web that had a picture of a really gray EGR modulator filter -
> and someone replied that the EGR modulator had ruptured, piping
> exhaust through the filter (which shouldn't happen) - and to replace
> the part.
>
> I'm tempted to just go to the local junkyard to find a replacement EGR
> modulator - guy quoted me $10. Pretty easy to install, once you've
> swapped it out a few times. ;-)
>
> Otherwise, I'd go to www.toyotadiscountparts.com. The part number is
> 25870-74090. It's about $44 there, but need to order $100 worth of
> parts to get the free shipping. Hmm...
>
> Regards,
>
> Michael
>

I had problems with my 1990 Camry having no power at higher rpm and heating
up when doing 100km/h. I tried to replace the EGR valve as well as the
modulator to no avail. Another symptom was that it was blowing off the
vacuum hose from the EGR valve. I'm thinking that the catalytic convertor
is plugged and will be replacing it tomorrow. Let you know how it goes.



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Old 11 Apr 2007, 05:05 pm   #6 (permalink)
Daniel
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Default Re: How I Solved My Camry's Stalling Problem

mrdarrett@gmail.com wrote:
> Good question. From what I've read, Toyota seems to design parts
> (like radiators) to last only 10 years or so, on the philosophy that,
> if it breaks after 10 years, you can't really complain.

===
Here's a link to a million mile Toyota. Tends to refute the idea that
parts are designed for limited life.
http://www.racetoretirement.org/

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Old 11 Apr 2007, 08:53 pm   #7 (permalink)
mrdarrett@gmail.com
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Default Re: How I Solved My Camry's Stalling Problem

On Apr 11, 3:05 pm, "Daniel" <nospampls2...@yahoo.com> wrote:
> mrdarr...@gmail.com wrote:
> > Good question. From what I've read, Toyota seems to design parts
> > (like radiators) to last only 10 years or so, on the philosophy that,
> > if it breaks after 10 years, you can't really complain.

>
> ===
> Here's a link to a million mile Toyota. Tends to refute the idea that
> parts are designed for limited life.http://www.racetoretirement.org/



I realized I misspoke. I didn't mean to imply that Toyota designed
*all* parts to last only 10 years. Just some parts. Radiators in
particular... (I'm still a little bitter about my radiator busting on
me 2 years ago... but I'll get over it... ;-)

I read a page somewhere discussing radiator life and design (probably
comparing the plastic and aluminum radiators) but I can't find the
link at the moment...

On the plus side, I'm absolutely amazed at how well the paint job on
my '96 Camry is holding up. Still looks new. Even where there are
some scratches where I banged the car accidentally with skis years
ago, there is no rust growth. Compare that with my dad's '86 Ford
Ranger - the entire paint job was peeling off after 8 years, and the
body was rusting.

Michael

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Old 12 Apr 2007, 08:12 am   #8 (permalink)
videokid400@hotmail.com
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Default Re: How I Solved My Camry's Stalling Problem

On Apr 12, 11:53 am, mrdarr...@gmail.com wrote:
> On Apr 11, 3:05 pm, "Daniel" <nospampls2...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
> > mrdarr...@gmail.com wrote:
> > > Good question. From what I've read, Toyota seems to design parts
> > > (like radiators) to last only 10 years or so, on the philosophy that,
> > > if it breaks after 10 years, you can't really complain.

>
> > ===
> > Here's a link to a million mile Toyota. Tends to refute the idea that
> > parts are designed for limited life.http://www.racetoretirement.org/

>
> I realized I misspoke. I didn't mean to imply that Toyota designed
> *all* parts to last only 10 years. Just some parts. Radiators in
> particular... (I'm still a little bitter about my radiator busting on
> me 2 years ago... but I'll get over it... ;-)
>
> I read a page somewhere discussing radiator life and design (probably
> comparing the plastic and aluminum radiators) but I can't find the
> link at the moment...
>
> On the plus side, I'm absolutely amazed at how well the paint job on
> my '96 Camry is holding up. Still looks new. Even where there are
> some scratches where I banged the car accidentally with skis years
> ago, there is no rust growth. Compare that with my dad's '86 Ford
> Ranger - the entire paint job was peeling off after 8 years, and the
> body was rusting.
>
> Michael


Dear oh dear still playing around with EGR ??

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Old 12 Apr 2007, 12:47 pm   #9 (permalink)
mrdarrett@gmail.com
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Default Re: How I Solved My Camry's Stalling Problem

On Apr 12, 6:12 am, videokid...@hotmail.com wrote:
> On Apr 12, 11:53 am, mrdarr...@gmail.com wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > On Apr 11, 3:05 pm, "Daniel" <nospampls2...@yahoo.com> wrote:

>
> > > mrdarr...@gmail.com wrote:
> > > > Good question. From what I've read, Toyota seems to design parts
> > > > (like radiators) to last only 10 years or so, on the philosophy that,
> > > > if it breaks after 10 years, you can't really complain.

>
> > > ===
> > > Here's a link to a million mile Toyota. Tends to refute the idea that
> > > parts are designed for limited life.http://www.racetoretirement.org/

>
> > I realized I misspoke. I didn't mean to imply that Toyota designed
> > *all* parts to last only 10 years. Just some parts. Radiators in
> > particular... (I'm still a little bitter about my radiator busting on
> > me 2 years ago... but I'll get over it... ;-)

>
> > I read a page somewhere discussing radiator life and design (probably
> > comparing the plastic and aluminum radiators) but I can't find the
> > link at the moment...

>
> > On the plus side, I'm absolutely amazed at how well the paint job on
> > my '96 Camry is holding up. Still looks new. Even where there are
> > some scratches where I banged the car accidentally with skis years
> > ago, there is no rust growth. Compare that with my dad's '86 Ford
> > Ranger - the entire paint job was peeling off after 8 years, and the
> > body was rusting.

>
> > Michael

>
> Dear oh dear still playing around with EGR ??- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -



All Done!

Got an EGR modulator from the junkyard yesterday - US $11, with tax.
(Imagine that - they tax used parts too, here in California...)

Drove for 15 miles, no stall. That was yesterday. Drive 46 miles
today for a work-related doctor's appointment. No stall. Going
there, I took a side-road, with lots of stops. On the way back, I
took the freeway, to make sure the engine didn't explode on me at
highway speeds. No explosion. [haha]

Thanks to everyone for all the advice and help

Michael

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Old 12 Apr 2007, 01:18 pm   #10 (permalink)
camry-keeper
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Default Re: How I Solved My Camry's Stalling Problem

You squirted water into your intake manifold??? The thermal gradients can
cause cracking. Nice problem-solving discussion. Thanks.

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