Proper steps to change an oil pan?

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 22 Jun 2013, 08:14 am   #1 (permalink)
ByTor
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Proper steps to change an oil pan?



1996 Tercel 1.5 liter 4 cylinder 160,000 miles.

Had my oil pan replaced recently and is now leaking in several spots. My
opinion is it wasn't allowed to dry long enough before it was filled
with oil and running engine.

Is there or should there be a proper procedure when doing this fix? It
appears it's not a gasket seal so I ruled out pinching maybe, seems to
be a silicon based sealant?

Thanks for any tips.
  Reply With Quote
Old 22 Jun 2013, 12:08 pm   #2 (permalink)
Jeff Strickland
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: Proper steps to change an oil pan?


"ByTor" <ByTor@snowdog.com> wrote in message
news:kq47mc$2ir$1@dont-email.me...
>
>
> 1996 Tercel 1.5 liter 4 cylinder 160,000 miles.
>
> Had my oil pan replaced recently and is now leaking in several spots. My
> opinion is it wasn't allowed to dry long enough before it was filled
> with oil and running engine.
>
> Is there or should there be a proper procedure when doing this fix? It
> appears it's not a gasket seal so I ruled out pinching maybe, seems to
> be a silicon based sealant?
>
> Thanks for any tips.


The oil is not pressurized at that location, and I have always used a
gasket. I would apply sealant to the pan-side and put the gasket on, then
install the pan to the cleaned block. A good gasket should be able to seal
that seam all by itself, and any glue would have the primary purpose of
holding the gasket in place while putting the pan back onto the motor.

The reason I would put sealant on the pan is that on the next service, I
could carry the pan to the bench and clean it easier than getting under the
car and trying to clean the bottom of the engine.

I do not recall any engine that does not use a pan gasket, and that relies
solely on sealant.

One strategy is to cut a couple of pieces of all-thread and screw them into
the bolt holes to use as alignment pins so the pan goes on straight. Make a
couple of guide pins that are about 2 inches long, not important how long,
that you can screw and unscrew by hand. Set the gasket straight on the pan,
then slide the pan up the pins you installed. Start a couple of screws to
hold the pan up, then remove the guides and install the remaining screws.
Starting at a hole in the center of the pan, tighten the bolts to a couple
of inch pounds, or so, in a criss-cross pattern working from side to side
and outward to the ends. Then repeat the pattern with your torque wrench and
set the bolts to the proper tightness.


  Reply With Quote
Old 23 Jun 2013, 12:12 am   #3 (permalink)
uncle_vito
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: Proper steps to change an oil pan?


"ByTor" <ByTor@snowdog.com> wrote in message
news:kq47mc$2ir$1@dont-email.me...
>
>
> 1996 Tercel 1.5 liter 4 cylinder 160,000 miles.
>
> Had my oil pan replaced recently and is now leaking in several spots. My
> opinion is it wasn't allowed to dry long enough before it was filled
> with oil and running engine.
>
> Is there or should there be a proper procedure when doing this fix? It
> appears it's not a gasket seal so I ruled out pinching maybe, seems to
> be a silicon based sealant?
>
> Thanks for any tips.


Try retorquing the bolts. The gasket typically 'breaks in' and shrinks,
requiring the bolts to be retorqued. Just doing this once should be
sufficient to stop the leaks and should never have to be done again.


  Reply With Quote
Old 23 Jun 2013, 07:52 am   #4 (permalink)
ByTor
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: Proper steps to change an oil pan?

In article <kq4lcn$a6a$1@dont-email.me>, crwlrjeff@yahoo.com says...
>
> "ByTor" <ByTor@snowdog.com> wrote in message
> news:kq47mc$2ir$1@dont-email.me...
> >
> >
> > 1996 Tercel 1.5 liter 4 cylinder 160,000 miles.
> >
> > Had my oil pan replaced recently and is now leaking in several spots. My
> > opinion is it wasn't allowed to dry long enough before it was filled
> > with oil and running engine.
> >
> > Is there or should there be a proper procedure when doing this fix? It
> > appears it's not a gasket seal so I ruled out pinching maybe, seems to
> > be a silicon based sealant?
> >
> > Thanks for any tips.

>
> The oil is not pressurized at that location, and I have always used a
> gasket. I would apply sealant to the pan-side and put the gasket on, then
> install the pan to the cleaned block. A good gasket should be able to seal
> that seam all by itself, and any glue would have the primary purpose of
> holding the gasket in place while putting the pan back onto the motor.
>
> The reason I would put sealant on the pan is that on the next service, I
> could carry the pan to the bench and clean it easier than getting under the
> car and trying to clean the bottom of the engine.
>
> I do not recall any engine that does not use a pan gasket, and that relies
> solely on sealant.
>
> One strategy is to cut a couple of pieces of all-thread and screw them into
> the bolt holes to use as alignment pins so the pan goes on straight. Make a
> couple of guide pins that are about 2 inches long, not important how long,
> that you can screw and unscrew by hand. Set the gasket straight on the pan,
> then slide the pan up the pins you installed. Start a couple of screws to
> hold the pan up, then remove the guides and install the remaining screws.
> Starting at a hole in the center of the pan, tighten the bolts to a couple
> of inch pounds, or so, in a criss-cross pattern working from side to side
> and outward to the ends. Then repeat the pattern with your torque wrench and
> set the bolts to the proper tightness.


Thanks Jeff for the detailed description..........;0)

I don't think they actually used a gasket because according to the
mechanic it didn't call for one or when the part was ordered. I will ask
him tomorrow morning why it doesn't require one becuase as you stated
was my suspicion as well about "not" using one, I found that a little
odd as well.

Again, thank you Jeff........;0).......My car is getting old but you
know what it still runs like a top considering the very slight
replacements over the years, the power steering pump being one recently
as the pulley was freezing up......works great now.
  Reply With Quote
Old 23 Jun 2013, 07:54 am   #5 (permalink)
ByTor
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: Proper steps to change an oil pan?

In article <51c68382$0$51374$862e30e2@ngroups.net>, uncle_vito2002
@yahoo.com says...
>
> "ByTor" <ByTor@snowdog.com> wrote in message
> news:kq47mc$2ir$1@dont-email.me...
> >
> >
> > 1996 Tercel 1.5 liter 4 cylinder 160,000 miles.
> >
> > Had my oil pan replaced recently and is now leaking in several spots. My
> > opinion is it wasn't allowed to dry long enough before it was filled
> > with oil and running engine.
> >
> > Is there or should there be a proper procedure when doing this fix? It
> > appears it's not a gasket seal so I ruled out pinching maybe, seems to
> > be a silicon based sealant?
> >
> > Thanks for any tips.

>
> Try retorquing the bolts. The gasket typically 'breaks in' and shrinks,
> requiring the bolts to be retorqued. Just doing this once should be
> sufficient to stop the leaks and should never have to be done again.


Thank you vito, my mechanic will be looking at it tomorrow morning. I
was intent on leaving the car there but he is insisting on "looking" at
it to see what's going on. What's going on is it's LEAKING and needs to
be re-sealed again........lol......But I believe he may just try
tightening again, we'll see.

Thx for your help.
  Reply With Quote
Old 23 Jun 2013, 12:10 pm   #6 (permalink)
uncle_vito
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: Proper steps to change an oil pan?


"ByTor" <ByTor@snowdog.com> wrote in message
news:kq6qs9$kfe$2@dont-email.me...
> In article <51c68382$0$51374$862e30e2@ngroups.net>, uncle_vito2002
> @yahoo.com says...
>>
>> "ByTor" <ByTor@snowdog.com> wrote in message
>> news:kq47mc$2ir$1@dont-email.me...
>> >
>> >
>> > 1996 Tercel 1.5 liter 4 cylinder 160,000 miles.
>> >
>> > Had my oil pan replaced recently and is now leaking in several spots.
>> > My
>> > opinion is it wasn't allowed to dry long enough before it was filled
>> > with oil and running engine.
>> >
>> > Is there or should there be a proper procedure when doing this fix? It
>> > appears it's not a gasket seal so I ruled out pinching maybe, seems to
>> > be a silicon based sealant?
>> >
>> > Thanks for any tips.

>>
>> Try retorquing the bolts. The gasket typically 'breaks in' and shrinks,
>> requiring the bolts to be retorqued. Just doing this once should be
>> sufficient to stop the leaks and should never have to be done again.

>
> Thank you vito, my mechanic will be looking at it tomorrow morning. I
> was intent on leaving the car there but he is insisting on "looking" at
> it to see what's going on. What's going on is it's LEAKING and needs to
> be re-sealed again........lol......But I believe he may just try
> tightening again, we'll see.
>
> Thx for your help.


Thanks.

I have had that happen with pans and I have replaced about 6 of them.
Three oil pans on Chevy's and 3 on transmissions. They always needed
retorquing after several thermal cycles, but these were with actual gaskets,
not RTV sealant


  Reply With Quote
Old 23 Jun 2013, 08:42 pm   #7 (permalink)
Geoff Welsh
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: Proper steps to change an oil pan?

ByTor wrote:
>
>
> 1996 Tercel 1.5 liter 4 cylinder 160,000 miles.
>
> Had my oil pan replaced recently and is now leaking in several spots. My
> opinion is it wasn't allowed to dry long enough before it was filled
> with oil and running engine.
>
> Is there or should there be a proper procedure when doing this fix? It
> appears it's not a gasket seal so I ruled out pinching maybe, seems to
> be a silicon based sealant?
>
> Thanks for any tips.


according to the Toyota parts explosion diagram, there was no gasket on
those, just silicone. There are however aftermarket gaskets available
which may be the way to go if the silicone didn't seal because the pan
is slightly banged up. If it didn't seal as an honest mistake (bad
luck), he just needs to try again.

The labor rate on that is over 4 hours, so doing it "again - for free"
makes for a very bad half-day.

GW
  Reply With Quote
Old 23 Jun 2013, 09:06 pm   #8 (permalink)
ByTor
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: Proper steps to change an oil pan?

In article <kq87su$34l$1@dont-email.me>, GeeDubya@some.rr.com says...
>
> ByTor wrote:
> >
> >
> > 1996 Tercel 1.5 liter 4 cylinder 160,000 miles.
> >
> > Had my oil pan replaced recently and is now leaking in several spots. My
> > opinion is it wasn't allowed to dry long enough before it was filled
> > with oil and running engine.
> >
> > Is there or should there be a proper procedure when doing this fix? It
> > appears it's not a gasket seal so I ruled out pinching maybe, seems to
> > be a silicon based sealant?
> >
> > Thanks for any tips.

>
> according to the Toyota parts explosion diagram, there was no gasket on
> those, just silicone. There are however aftermarket gaskets available
> which may be the way to go if the silicone didn't seal because the pan
> is slightly banged up. If it didn't seal as an honest mistake (bad
> luck), he just needs to try again.
>
> The labor rate on that is over 4 hours, so doing it "again - for free"
> makes for a very bad half-day.
>
> GW


Which 1hr is actual labor & 3hrs drying time..........LMAO

My original pan had a few dings on it but *rust* is what inevitably did
it in. But yes, when I went to NAPA to look at the part it was listed
without a gasket as well. Well we'll see in the morning what he does, if
he has to do it again, well, I'm not feeling his pain.
  Reply With Quote
Old 23 Jun 2013, 09:27 pm   #9 (permalink)
Geoff Welsh
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: Proper steps to change an oil pan?

ByTor wrote:
> In article<kq87su$34l$1@dont-email.me>, GeeDubya@some.rr.com says...
>>
>> ByTor wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>> 1996 Tercel 1.5 liter 4 cylinder 160,000 miles.
>>>
>>> Had my oil pan replaced recently and is now leaking in several spots. My
>>> opinion is it wasn't allowed to dry long enough before it was filled
>>> with oil and running engine.
>>>
>>> Is there or should there be a proper procedure when doing this fix? It
>>> appears it's not a gasket seal so I ruled out pinching maybe, seems to
>>> be a silicon based sealant?
>>>
>>> Thanks for any tips.

>>
>> according to the Toyota parts explosion diagram, there was no gasket on
>> those, just silicone. There are however aftermarket gaskets available
>> which may be the way to go if the silicone didn't seal because the pan
>> is slightly banged up. If it didn't seal as an honest mistake (bad
>> luck), he just needs to try again.
>>
>> The labor rate on that is over 4 hours, so doing it "again - for free"
>> makes for a very bad half-day.
>>
>> GW

>
> Which 1hr is actual labor& 3hrs drying time..........LMAO
>


no....the procedure has the timing belt, AC, and exhaust all coming off
GW

  Reply With Quote
Old 24 Jun 2013, 04:27 pm   #10 (permalink)
ByTor
Guest
  • Posts: n/a
  • User Status:


Default Re: Proper steps to change an oil pan?

In article <kq8ahr$d42$1@dont-email.me>, GeeDubya@some.rr.com says...
>
> ByTor wrote:
> > In article<kq87su$34l$1@dont-email.me>, GeeDubya@some.rr.com says...
> >>
> >> ByTor wrote:
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> 1996 Tercel 1.5 liter 4 cylinder 160,000 miles.
> >>>
> >>> Had my oil pan replaced recently and is now leaking in several spots. My
> >>> opinion is it wasn't allowed to dry long enough before it was filled
> >>> with oil and running engine.
> >>>
> >>> Is there or should there be a proper procedure when doing this fix? It
> >>> appears it's not a gasket seal so I ruled out pinching maybe, seems to
> >>> be a silicon based sealant?
> >>>
> >>> Thanks for any tips.
> >>
> >> according to the Toyota parts explosion diagram, there was no gasket on
> >> those, just silicone. There are however aftermarket gaskets available
> >> which may be the way to go if the silicone didn't seal because the pan
> >> is slightly banged up. If it didn't seal as an honest mistake (bad
> >> luck), he just needs to try again.
> >>
> >> The labor rate on that is over 4 hours, so doing it "again - for free"
> >> makes for a very bad half-day.
> >>
> >> GW

> >
> > Which 1hr is actual labor& 3hrs drying time..........LMAO
> >

>
> no....the procedure has the timing belt, AC, and exhaust all coming off
> GW


Maybe remove the transmission as well.
  Reply With Quote

Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:08 am.

Attribution:
Autoblog
Powered by Yahoo Answers



ToyotaLexusForum.com is an unofficial community for car enthusiasts. ToyotaLexusForum.com is not affiliated with Toyota Motor Corporation in any way.
Toyota Motor Corporation does not sponsor, support, or endorse ToyotaLexusForum.com in any way.
Copyright/trademark/sales mark infringements are not intended or implied.