Performance Brake Pads and Rotors for 2001 4Runner

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Old 23 Sep 2009, 11:50 am   #1 (permalink)
SMS
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Default Performance Brake Pads and Rotors for 2001 4Runner

The rotors on my 4Runner need to be replaced because when they heat up
they warp and the brakes chatter. This occurs only when driving in the
mountains where there's more harder braking than in city driving. The
original rotors have been resurfaced once. and that's about it for them.

Are there any higher performance rotors that are less likely to warp or
fade than the stock Toyota rotors? What are the advantages and
disadvantage of drilled versus slotted versus drilled and slotted versus
plain? Do all slotted rotors have a left and right?

Online I've found:

Brembo Sport Rotors (drilled and slotted) $110 each
Disc Italia (drilled and slotted) $115 each
Disc Italia (slotted) $115 each
Power Disc (drilled) $90 each
Power Disc (slotted) $90 each
X Brakes (drilled and slotted) $62.50 each
Power Stop (drilled) $96 each
Power Slot (slotted) $99 each
Power Slot Cryo Slot (slotted) $130 each

JC Whitney no-brand listed (drilled) $66 each


What about brake pads? What should I get?
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Old 23 Sep 2009, 12:20 pm   #2 (permalink)
Jeff Strickland
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Default Re: Performance Brake Pads and Rotors for 2001 4Runner

I'm confused.

Once the rotors warp, they remain warped until they are machined or
replaced. Warping is not a transient condition where the experience is on a
mountain road but not on other roads. And, braking on a mountain road should
be lighter and more evenly applied on a mountain road than in other places.
The brakes might be used more often, but the braking ought not be "harder".
It you are driving into a turn and mashing the brakes, your passengers are
probably on the verge of puking.

Having said that, slots and crossdrilling are done to help extract heat. The
pads also act, in a manner, as a heat sink when they are still thick. The
problem is, you allow the pads to get thin and htey do not act as a heat
sink any longer. Coupled with aggressive driving, they build up heat and
this helps warp the rotors.

One thing to consider with slotted and crossdrilled rotors is that they can
not be machined on a lathe. I bought some bargain-basement rotors for my
car, and the front rotors were warped from the get-go. I called the company,
they shipped another set that was also warped. I kept the original set, got
the new set ground on a flywheel grinder and installed them, then got the
original set ground too, and put them into storage after coating them and
wrapping them in plastic wrap. I'm thinking that I can use them later, when
the rotors on the car wear out ... I can't recommend the bargain basement
place I bought my brakes from -- only because I had to buy additional
service before I could use them -- but I'm reasonably happy with the
performance so far.

I bought 4 rotors and both sets of pads for the light side of $200, then
they shipped two more front rotors for free. I did a search on eBay for my
brakes.






"SMS" <scharf.steven@geemail.com> wrote in message
news:4aba4368$0$1595$742ec2ed@news.sonic.net...
> The rotors on my 4Runner need to be replaced because when they heat up
> they warp and the brakes chatter. This occurs only when driving in the
> mountains where there's more harder braking than in city driving. The
> original rotors have been resurfaced once. and that's about it for them.
>
> Are there any higher performance rotors that are less likely to warp or
> fade than the stock Toyota rotors? What are the advantages and
> disadvantage of drilled versus slotted versus drilled and slotted versus
> plain? Do all slotted rotors have a left and right?
>
> Online I've found:
>
> Brembo Sport Rotors (drilled and slotted) $110 each
> Disc Italia (drilled and slotted) $115 each
> Disc Italia (slotted) $115 each
> Power Disc (drilled) $90 each
> Power Disc (slotted) $90 each
> X Brakes (drilled and slotted) $62.50 each
> Power Stop (drilled) $96 each
> Power Slot (slotted) $99 each
> Power Slot Cryo Slot (slotted) $130 each
>
> JC Whitney no-brand listed (drilled) $66 each
>
>
> What about brake pads? What should I get?



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Old 23 Sep 2009, 12:54 pm   #3 (permalink)
Ray O
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Default Re: Performance Brake Pads and Rotors for 2001 4Runner


"SMS" <scharf.steven@geemail.com> wrote in message
news:4aba4368$0$1595$742ec2ed@news.sonic.net...
> The rotors on my 4Runner need to be replaced because when they heat up
> they warp and the brakes chatter. This occurs only when driving in the
> mountains where there's more harder braking than in city driving. The
> original rotors have been resurfaced once. and that's about it for them.
>
> Are there any higher performance rotors that are less likely to warp or
> fade than the stock Toyota rotors? What are the advantages and
> disadvantage of drilled versus slotted versus drilled and slotted versus
> plain? Do all slotted rotors have a left and right?
>
> Online I've found:
>
> Brembo Sport Rotors (drilled and slotted) $110 each
> Disc Italia (drilled and slotted) $115 each
> Disc Italia (slotted) $115 each
> Power Disc (drilled) $90 each
> Power Disc (slotted) $90 each
> X Brakes (drilled and slotted) $62.50 each
> Power Stop (drilled) $96 each
> Power Slot (slotted) $99 each
> Power Slot Cryo Slot (slotted) $130 each
>
> JC Whitney no-brand listed (drilled) $66 each
>
>
> What about brake pads? What should I get?


The advantage of drilled and slotted rotors is that they allow the gas that
the pads generate to escape. If the gas builds up between the pad and
rotor, the effect is a little like an air hockey table so friction is
reduced. The disadvantage of slotted and drilled rotors is that they cost
more and are not easily resurfaced.

When you resurface rotors, you reduce their ability to dissipate heat so
they are more likely to warp.

Some things that can reduce brake fade and rotor warpage are selecting a
lower gear on long downhill grades, and if you have rear drum brakes, making
sure that they are adjusted properly.

I used to do a lot of driving in the mountains and did not experience brake
fade or rotor warpage on any of the Toyotas I had as company cars.

The only aftermarket brand you listed that I'm familiar with is Brembo.
They should be OK but before you go that route, try checking the back brakes
and shifting to a lower gear.
--

Ray O
(correct punctuation to reply)


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Old 23 Sep 2009, 01:04 pm   #4 (permalink)
JoeSpareBedroom
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Default Re: Performance Brake Pads and Rotors for 2001 4Runner

"Ray O" <rokigawa@NOSPAMtristarassociates.com> wrote in message
news:h9djsq$jct$1@news.eternal-september.org...
>
> "SMS" <scharf.steven@geemail.com> wrote in message
> news:4aba4368$0$1595$742ec2ed@news.sonic.net...
>> The rotors on my 4Runner need to be replaced because when they heat up
>> they warp and the brakes chatter. This occurs only when driving in the
>> mountains where there's more harder braking than in city driving. The
>> original rotors have been resurfaced once. and that's about it for them.
>>
>> Are there any higher performance rotors that are less likely to warp or
>> fade than the stock Toyota rotors? What are the advantages and
>> disadvantage of drilled versus slotted versus drilled and slotted versus
>> plain? Do all slotted rotors have a left and right?
>>
>> Online I've found:
>>
>> Brembo Sport Rotors (drilled and slotted) $110 each
>> Disc Italia (drilled and slotted) $115 each
>> Disc Italia (slotted) $115 each
>> Power Disc (drilled) $90 each
>> Power Disc (slotted) $90 each
>> X Brakes (drilled and slotted) $62.50 each
>> Power Stop (drilled) $96 each
>> Power Slot (slotted) $99 each
>> Power Slot Cryo Slot (slotted) $130 each
>>
>> JC Whitney no-brand listed (drilled) $66 each
>>
>>
>> What about brake pads? What should I get?

>
> The advantage of drilled and slotted rotors is that they allow the gas
> that the pads generate to escape. If the gas builds up between the pad
> and rotor, the effect is a little like an air hockey table so friction is
> reduced. The disadvantage of slotted and drilled rotors is that they cost
> more and are not easily resurfaced.
>
> When you resurface rotors, you reduce their ability to dissipate heat so
> they are more likely to warp.
>
> Some things that can reduce brake fade and rotor warpage are selecting a
> lower gear on long downhill grades, and if you have rear drum brakes,
> making sure that they are adjusted properly.
>
> I used to do a lot of driving in the mountains and did not experience
> brake fade or rotor warpage on any of the Toyotas I had as company cars.
>
> The only aftermarket brand you listed that I'm familiar with is Brembo.
> They should be OK but before you go that route, try checking the back
> brakes and shifting to a lower gear.
> --
>
> Ray O
> (correct punctuation to reply)



Check/adjust the back brakes for what, Ray?


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Old 23 Sep 2009, 01:45 pm   #5 (permalink)
SMS
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Default Re: Performance Brake Pads and Rotors for 2001 4Runner

Ray O wrote:

> I used to do a lot of driving in the mountains and did not experience brake
> fade or rotor warpage on any of the Toyotas I had as company cars.
>
> The only aftermarket brand you listed that I'm familiar with is Brembo.
> They should be OK but before you go that route, try checking the back brakes
> and shifting to a lower gear.


I already use lower gears while descending, though perhaps more than I
should these days simply because I'm trying so hard to keep the brakes
cooler. The back brakes are fine in terms of remaining material, but I
thought they were self-adjusting and I didn't have to do anything in
that regard.

It may just be that the original rotors should never have been
resurfaced in the first place, and once they were thinner they warped
from the heat. I don't recall ever having a problem when the vehicle was
newer. So maybe I'll just go with OEM rotors since if you can't
resurface the slotted/drilled rotors then there's no point in the extra
expense. It's getting close to the need for a front brake job so I want
to select the parts now.
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Old 23 Sep 2009, 02:17 pm   #6 (permalink)
Ray O
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Default Re: Performance Brake Pads and Rotors for 2001 4Runner


"JoeSpareBedroom" <newstrash@frontiernet.net> wrote in message
news:Wysum.30832$j34.14633@newsfe01.iad...
> "Ray O" <rokigawa@NOSPAMtristarassociates.com> wrote in message
> news:h9djsq$jct$1@news.eternal-september.org...
>>
>> "SMS" <scharf.steven@geemail.com> wrote in message
>> news:4aba4368$0$1595$742ec2ed@news.sonic.net...
>>> The rotors on my 4Runner need to be replaced because when they heat up
>>> they warp and the brakes chatter. This occurs only when driving in the
>>> mountains where there's more harder braking than in city driving. The
>>> original rotors have been resurfaced once. and that's about it for them.
>>>
>>> Are there any higher performance rotors that are less likely to warp or
>>> fade than the stock Toyota rotors? What are the advantages and
>>> disadvantage of drilled versus slotted versus drilled and slotted versus
>>> plain? Do all slotted rotors have a left and right?
>>>
>>> Online I've found:
>>>
>>> Brembo Sport Rotors (drilled and slotted) $110 each
>>> Disc Italia (drilled and slotted) $115 each
>>> Disc Italia (slotted) $115 each
>>> Power Disc (drilled) $90 each
>>> Power Disc (slotted) $90 each
>>> X Brakes (drilled and slotted) $62.50 each
>>> Power Stop (drilled) $96 each
>>> Power Slot (slotted) $99 each
>>> Power Slot Cryo Slot (slotted) $130 each
>>>
>>> JC Whitney no-brand listed (drilled) $66 each
>>>
>>>
>>> What about brake pads? What should I get?

>>
>> The advantage of drilled and slotted rotors is that they allow the gas
>> that the pads generate to escape. If the gas builds up between the pad
>> and rotor, the effect is a little like an air hockey table so friction is
>> reduced. The disadvantage of slotted and drilled rotors is that they
>> cost more and are not easily resurfaced.
>>
>> When you resurface rotors, you reduce their ability to dissipate heat so
>> they are more likely to warp.
>>
>> Some things that can reduce brake fade and rotor warpage are selecting a
>> lower gear on long downhill grades, and if you have rear drum brakes,
>> making sure that they are adjusted properly.
>>
>> I used to do a lot of driving in the mountains and did not experience
>> brake fade or rotor warpage on any of the Toyotas I had as company cars.
>>
>> The only aftermarket brand you listed that I'm familiar with is Brembo.
>> They should be OK but before you go that route, try checking the back
>> brakes and shifting to a lower gear.
>> --
>>
>> Ray O
>> (correct punctuation to reply)

>
>
> Check/adjust the back brakes for what, Ray?


Even though the front brakes do most of the work, the rear brakes are there
for a reason and they do provide some braking action.

The rear drum brakes should be checked periodically to make sure that they
are adjusted properly. If they are too loose, they do not brake as
effectively and the front brakes end up doing even more of the work than
they normally do, resulting in more rapid front brake lining wear and more
front brake heat buildup.
--

Ray O
(correct punctuation to reply)


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Old 23 Sep 2009, 02:22 pm   #7 (permalink)
Ray O
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Default Re: Performance Brake Pads and Rotors for 2001 4Runner


"SMS" <scharf.steven@geemail.com> wrote in message
news:4aba5e77$0$1616$742ec2ed@news.sonic.net...
> Ray O wrote:
>
>> I used to do a lot of driving in the mountains and did not experience
>> brake fade or rotor warpage on any of the Toyotas I had as company cars.
>>
>> The only aftermarket brand you listed that I'm familiar with is Brembo.
>> They should be OK but before you go that route, try checking the back
>> brakes and shifting to a lower gear.

>
> I already use lower gears while descending, though perhaps more than I
> should these days simply because I'm trying so hard to keep the brakes
> cooler. The back brakes are fine in terms of remaining material, but I
> thought they were self-adjusting and I didn't have to do anything in that
> regard.
>
> It may just be that the original rotors should never have been resurfaced
> in the first place, and once they were thinner they warped from the heat.
> I don't recall ever having a problem when the vehicle was newer. So maybe
> I'll just go with OEM rotors since if you can't resurface the
> slotted/drilled rotors then there's no point in the extra expense. It's
> getting close to the need for a front brake job so I want to select the
> parts now.


Although the rear brakes are self adjusting, they probably self-adjust when
you apply the parking brake. If you seldom use the parking brake, the rear
brakes don't self-adjust or they are so far out of adjustment that the
self-adjuster mechanism can't adjust enough.

To check your rear brakes, raise and properly support the vehicle so that
the rear wheels are off of the ground. ("properly support" means having the
wheels on the ground chocked and the vehicle supported by jack stands).
Give the back wheels a spin like Vana White on Wheel of Fortune. The wheel
should rotate once to one-and-a half times. If the wheel rotates freely
with little or no friction, they are out of adjustment.

In my experience, I've found that rotors that have been resurfaced almost
always warp within a year so I don't resurface rotors, just replace them.

If you do the front brake job yourself, make sure that the caliper slides
are not sticking.
--

Ray O
(correct punctuation to reply)



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Old 23 Sep 2009, 02:35 pm   #8 (permalink)
Hachiroku ハチロク
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Default Re: Performance Brake Pads and Rotors for 2001 4Runner

On Wed, 23 Sep 2009 08:50:13 -0700, SMS wrote:

> The rotors on my 4Runner need to be replaced because when they heat up
> they warp and the brakes chatter. This occurs only when driving in the
> mountains where there's more harder braking than in city driving. The
> original rotors have been resurfaced once. and that's about it for them.
>
> Are there any higher performance rotors that are less likely to warp or
> fade than the stock Toyota rotors? What are the advantages and
> disadvantage of drilled versus slotted versus drilled and slotted versus
> plain? Do all slotted rotors have a left and right?
>
> Online I've found:
>
> Brembo Sport Rotors (drilled and slotted) $110 each Disc Italia (drilled
> and slotted) $115 each Disc Italia (slotted) $115 each
> Power Disc (drilled) $90 each
> Power Disc (slotted) $90 each
> X Brakes (drilled and slotted) $62.50 each Power Stop (drilled) $96 each
> Power Slot (slotted) $99 each
> Power Slot Cryo Slot (slotted) $130 each
>
> JC Whitney no-brand listed (drilled) $66 each
>
>
> What about brake pads? What should I get?


What Ray said.

Also check Endless. They specialize in Toyota brakes.

I don't use drilled/slotted rotors because they wear the pads faster,
however, in your case they might solve your problem.

As for the rears, most Toyta rear drums (if you have drums) are adjusted
by actuating the e-brake lever/handle. On models with the handle between
the seats, lifting the handle and lowering repeatedly adjusts the rear
shoes. The 4-Runner I am not that familiar with.



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Old 23 Sep 2009, 05:09 pm   #9 (permalink)
Jeff Strickland
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Default Re: Performance Brake Pads and Rotors for 2001 4Runner


"Hachiroku ????" <Trueno@e86.GTS> wrote in message
newsan.2009.09.23.18.35.27.328202@e86.GTS...
> On Wed, 23 Sep 2009 08:50:13 -0700, SMS wrote:
>
>> The rotors on my 4Runner need to be replaced because when they heat up
>> they warp and the brakes chatter. This occurs only when driving in the
>> mountains where there's more harder braking than in city driving. The
>> original rotors have been resurfaced once. and that's about it for them.
>>
>> Are there any higher performance rotors that are less likely to warp or
>> fade than the stock Toyota rotors? What are the advantages and
>> disadvantage of drilled versus slotted versus drilled and slotted versus
>> plain? Do all slotted rotors have a left and right?
>>
>> Online I've found:
>>
>> Brembo Sport Rotors (drilled and slotted) $110 each Disc Italia (drilled
>> and slotted) $115 each Disc Italia (slotted) $115 each
>> Power Disc (drilled) $90 each
>> Power Disc (slotted) $90 each
>> X Brakes (drilled and slotted) $62.50 each Power Stop (drilled) $96 each
>> Power Slot (slotted) $99 each
>> Power Slot Cryo Slot (slotted) $130 each
>>
>> JC Whitney no-brand listed (drilled) $66 each
>>
>>
>> What about brake pads? What should I get?

>
> What Ray said.
>
> Also check Endless. They specialize in Toyota brakes.
>
> I don't use drilled/slotted rotors because they wear the pads faster,
> however, in your case they might solve your problem.
>
> As for the rears, most Toyta rear drums (if you have drums) are adjusted
> by actuating the e-brake lever/handle. On models with the handle between
> the seats, lifting the handle and lowering repeatedly adjusts the rear
> shoes. The 4-Runner I am not that familiar with.
>
>
>


Rear Drum brakes self-adjust by using the parking brake? Are you sure?

Back in the days of old, drum brakes self-adjusted when the brakes were
applied while the vehicle was backing up.

The idea is(was) that the primary and secondary shoes exchange roles in
reverse, and the movement of the shoes pulls a cable that moves a lever that
cranks a cog that holds the shoes spread apart. If the brakes needed to be
adjusted, one simply drove backwards and applied the pedal as needed.
Perhaps one had to repeatedly apply the brakes in Reverse if the brakes were
significantly maladjusted.

I was not aware that the rear shoes adjust because the parking brake handle
(or pedal) gets used.










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Old 23 Sep 2009, 05:18 pm   #10 (permalink)
Hachiroku ハチロク
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Default Re: Performance Brake Pads and Rotors for 2001 4Runner

On Wed, 23 Sep 2009 14:09:46 -0700, Jeff Strickland wrote:

>
> "Hachiroku ????" <Trueno@e86.GTS> wrote in message
> newsan.2009.09.23.18.35.27.328202@e86.GTS...
>> On Wed, 23 Sep 2009 08:50:13 -0700, SMS wrote:
>>
>>> The rotors on my 4Runner need to be replaced because when they heat up
>>> they warp and the brakes chatter. This occurs only when driving in the
>>> mountains where there's more harder braking than in city driving. The
>>> original rotors have been resurfaced once. and that's about it for
>>> them.
>>>
>>> Are there any higher performance rotors that are less likely to warp or
>>> fade than the stock Toyota rotors? What are the advantages and
>>> disadvantage of drilled versus slotted versus drilled and slotted
>>> versus plain? Do all slotted rotors have a left and right?
>>>
>>> Online I've found:
>>>
>>> Brembo Sport Rotors (drilled and slotted) $110 each Disc Italia
>>> (drilled and slotted) $115 each Disc Italia (slotted) $115 each Power
>>> Disc (drilled) $90 each
>>> Power Disc (slotted) $90 each
>>> X Brakes (drilled and slotted) $62.50 each Power Stop (drilled) $96
>>> each Power Slot (slotted) $99 each
>>> Power Slot Cryo Slot (slotted) $130 each
>>>
>>> JC Whitney no-brand listed (drilled) $66 each
>>>
>>>
>>> What about brake pads? What should I get?

>>
>> What Ray said.
>>
>> Also check Endless. They specialize in Toyota brakes.
>>
>> I don't use drilled/slotted rotors because they wear the pads faster,
>> however, in your case they might solve your problem.
>>
>> As for the rears, most Toyta rear drums (if you have drums) are adjusted
>> by actuating the e-brake lever/handle. On models with the handle between
>> the seats, lifting the handle and lowering repeatedly adjusts the rear
>> shoes. The 4-Runner I am not that familiar with.
>>
>>
>>
>>

> Rear Drum brakes self-adjust by using the parking brake? Are you sure?


On my 2 Tercels. Pulling the e brake (parking brake?) lever actuated the
adjusters.

>
> Back in the days of old, drum brakes self-adjusted when the brakes were
> applied while the vehicle was backing up.
>
> The idea is(was) that the primary and secondary shoes exchange roles in
> reverse, and the movement of the shoes pulls a cable that moves a lever
> that cranks a cog that holds the shoes spread apart. If the brakes needed
> to be adjusted, one simply drove backwards and applied the pedal as
> needed. Perhaps one had to repeatedly apply the brakes in Reverse if the
> brakes were significantly maladjusted.
>
> I was not aware that the rear shoes adjust because the parking brake
> handle (or pedal) gets used.


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