Toyota must submit data on rusting Tundras

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Old 20 Nov 2009, 04:28 pm   #1 (permalink)
Ed White
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Default Toyota must submit data on rusting Tundras

Toyota must submit data on rusting Tundras
Kathy Jackson
Automotive News
November 20, 2009 - 1:25 pm ET

LOS ANGELES -- Already facing a number of quality-related problems,
Toyota Motor Corp. must submit information to the National Highway
Traffic Safety Administration today in response to complaints about
rusted frames on 2000 and 2001 Toyota Tundra pickups.

NHTSA began a preliminary evaluation of the problem Oct. 6 and gave
Toyota the Nov. 20 deadline.

It is too early to speculate what we will do for Tundra, Toyota
spokesman Brian Lyons said. They're only looking at one specific
portion of the frame -- the cross member that supports the spare tire
-- not the entire frame.

The frames were manufactured by Dana Corp., which also supplied the
frames for the 750,000 Tacoma pickups that suffered similar rust
problems and were the subject of voluntary recalls and buybacks last
year.

Dana spokesman Chuck Hartlage said today that the supplier was helping
Toyota with the Tundra investigation.

NHTSA is investigating 20 reports that relate to spare-tire separation
and brake system failures resulting from severe frame corrosion on the
pickups.

As of yesterday, the federal agency had received 238 complaints about
the 2000 models and 48 about the 2001 models. The complaints range
from brake-line corrosion to corrosion of the entire frame. More than
70 complaints had been posted since NHTSA launched its investigation
in October.

My mechanic suggested that it was unsafe to drive because the brake
line connection points were so corroded that they could fail while in
operation, one consumer wrote in his complaint.

There have been reports of three injuries but no deaths.

Lyons confirmed that Dana supplied the frames. In March 2008, Toyota
agreed to buy back 1995-2000 Tacomas at 150 percent of the high-end
Kelley Blue Book value.

In November 2008, Toyota issued a recall on 2001 to 2004 Tacomas. If
no rust had occurred, Toyota automatically extended the warranty to 15
years with unlimited mileage. If there was rust, the frames were
replaced.

Lyons said no connection exists between the Tacoma and Tundra frames.

The frames were built to a different design and at different plants,
he said, so this is not apples to apples.

Different plants

Lyons said the Tacoma and Tundra frames were built at different Dana
plants. He said Toyota does not blame Dana.

Ultimately, this is our vehicle and our responsibility, Lyons said.

He said he does not know the next step, but NHTSA could do an
engineering analysis of the truck, which is more extensive than the
preliminary examination.

Toyota already is entangled in high-profile lawsuits involving
rollovers and faulty steering rods and is facing a huge recall related
to unintended acceleration.

Lyons said the company has not decided what the fix will be for
complaints about unintended acceleration in certain Toyota and Lexus
models. Last month the company sent letters to 3.8 million owners
urging them to remove the floor mats from their vehicles while the
company ponders how to fix the problem.

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Old 20 Nov 2009, 04:56 pm   #2 (permalink)
Hachiroku $B%O%A%m%/(B
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Default Re: Toyota must submit data on rusting Tundras

On Fri, 20 Nov 2009 14:28:14 -0800, Ed White wrote:

> “It is too early to speculate what we will do for Tundra,” Toyota
> spokesman Brian Lyons said. “They're only looking at one specific
> portion of the frame -- the cross member that supports the spare tire --
> not the entire frame.”
>
> The frames were manufactured by Dana Corp., which also supplied the frames
> for the 750,000 Tacoma pickups that suffered similar rust problems and
> were the subject of voluntary recalls and buybacks last year.



Your post blames this on Toyota, but it seems Dana is the culprit, both on
the Tundra and the Tacoma frame problems.


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Old 20 Nov 2009, 05:14 pm   #3 (permalink)
Mike Hunter
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Default Re: Toyota must submit data on rusting Tundras


Toyotas problem is in the piss poor quality steel they buy from Nippon Steel
of Japan. Dana only does the stamping so Toyota can claim the frames as
N.A. parts.


"Ed White" <ce.white3@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:2de532e3-1805-451c-9824-b77f38df508d@g1g2000vbr.googlegroups.com...
Toyota must submit data on rusting Tundras
Kathy Jackson
Automotive News
November 20, 2009 - 1:25 pm ET

LOS ANGELES -- Already facing a number of quality-related problems,
Toyota Motor Corp. must submit information to the National Highway
Traffic Safety Administration today in response to complaints about
rusted frames on 2000 and 2001 Toyota Tundra pickups.

NHTSA began a preliminary evaluation of the problem Oct. 6 and gave
Toyota the Nov. 20 deadline.

It is too early to speculate what we will do for Tundra, Toyota
spokesman Brian Lyons said. They're only looking at one specific
portion of the frame -- the cross member that supports the spare tire
-- not the entire frame.

The frames were manufactured by Dana Corp., which also supplied the
frames for the 750,000 Tacoma pickups that suffered similar rust
problems and were the subject of voluntary recalls and buybacks last
year.

Dana spokesman Chuck Hartlage said today that the supplier was helping
Toyota with the Tundra investigation.

NHTSA is investigating 20 reports that relate to spare-tire separation
and brake system failures resulting from severe frame corrosion on the
pickups.

As of yesterday, the federal agency had received 238 complaints about
the 2000 models and 48 about the 2001 models. The complaints range
from brake-line corrosion to corrosion of the entire frame. More than
70 complaints had been posted since NHTSA launched its investigation
in October.

My mechanic suggested that it was unsafe to drive because the brake
line connection points were so corroded that they could fail while in
operation, one consumer wrote in his complaint.

There have been reports of three injuries but no deaths.

Lyons confirmed that Dana supplied the frames. In March 2008, Toyota
agreed to buy back 1995-2000 Tacomas at 150 percent of the high-end
Kelley Blue Book value.

In November 2008, Toyota issued a recall on 2001 to 2004 Tacomas. If
no rust had occurred, Toyota automatically extended the warranty to 15
years with unlimited mileage. If there was rust, the frames were
replaced.

Lyons said no connection exists between the Tacoma and Tundra frames.

The frames were built to a different design and at different plants,
he said, so this is not apples to apples.

Different plants

Lyons said the Tacoma and Tundra frames were built at different Dana
plants. He said Toyota does not blame Dana.

Ultimately, this is our vehicle and our responsibility, Lyons said.

He said he does not know the next step, but NHTSA could do an
engineering analysis of the truck, which is more extensive than the
preliminary examination.

Toyota already is entangled in high-profile lawsuits involving
rollovers and faulty steering rods and is facing a huge recall related
to unintended acceleration.

Lyons said the company has not decided what the fix will be for
complaints about unintended acceleration in certain Toyota and Lexus
models. Last month the company sent letters to 3.8 million owners
urging them to remove the floor mats from their vehicles while the
company ponders how to fix the problem.


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Old 20 Nov 2009, 06:42 pm   #4 (permalink)
dbu`
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Default Re: Toyota must submit data on rusting Tundras

In article <4b0722d9$0$6765$ce5e7886@news-radius.ptd.net>,
"Mike Hunter" <Mikehunt2@lycos,com> wrote:

> Toyotas problem is in the piss poor quality steel they buy from Nippon Steel
> of Japan. Dana only does the stamping so Toyota can claim the frames as
> N.A. parts.


Good news here!! I did see three more Tundras in the past week. They
were not in contractor mode however. One had a cover over the box, I
forget what they call those things, but it didn't appear to be a work
type truck to me, perhaps one that's used in going food shopping. The
other two had nothing in the box, in fact the box looked clean as a
whistle. In the meantime I've seen numerous, perhaps hundreds of Dodge,
GMC, Fords pu's hauling all kinds of cargo and pulling various trailers
with a varying amount of cargo along with that observation some were in
a rough looking shape varying degrees of course, like you'd see on a
work site. I might add, some were older trucks, surely not new which
means they've been around the block a few times.

Contractors don't trade in every year for nice pretty and shiny new
trucks, they pretty much run them into the ground then buy a new or
later used basic work truck. Makes sense.

Seems at least here the American PU trucks rule.

Cheers

>
>
> "Ed White" <ce.white3@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:2de532e3-1805-451c-9824-b77f38df508d@g1g2000vbr.googlegroups.com...
> Toyota must submit data on rusting Tundras
> Kathy Jackson
> Automotive News
> November 20, 2009 - 1:25 pm ET
>
> LOS ANGELES -- Already facing a number of quality-related problems,
> Toyota Motor Corp. must submit information to the National Highway
> Traffic Safety Administration today in response to complaints about
> rusted frames on 2000 and 2001 Toyota Tundra pickups.
>
> NHTSA began a preliminary evaluation of the problem Oct. 6 and gave
> Toyota the Nov. 20 deadline.
>
> It is too early to speculate what we will do for Tundra, Toyota
> spokesman Brian Lyons said. They're only looking at one specific
> portion of the frame -- the cross member that supports the spare tire
> -- not the entire frame.
>
> The frames were manufactured by Dana Corp., which also supplied the
> frames for the 750,000 Tacoma pickups that suffered similar rust
> problems and were the subject of voluntary recalls and buybacks last
> year.
>
> Dana spokesman Chuck Hartlage said today that the supplier was helping
> Toyota with the Tundra investigation.
>
> NHTSA is investigating 20 reports that relate to spare-tire separation
> and brake system failures resulting from severe frame corrosion on the
> pickups.
>
> As of yesterday, the federal agency had received 238 complaints about
> the 2000 models and 48 about the 2001 models. The complaints range
> from brake-line corrosion to corrosion of the entire frame. More than
> 70 complaints had been posted since NHTSA launched its investigation
> in October.
>
> My mechanic suggested that it was unsafe to drive because the brake
> line connection points were so corroded that they could fail while in
> operation, one consumer wrote in his complaint.
>
> There have been reports of three injuries but no deaths.
>
> Lyons confirmed that Dana supplied the frames. In March 2008, Toyota
> agreed to buy back 1995-2000 Tacomas at 150 percent of the high-end
> Kelley Blue Book value.
>
> In November 2008, Toyota issued a recall on 2001 to 2004 Tacomas. If
> no rust had occurred, Toyota automatically extended the warranty to 15
> years with unlimited mileage. If there was rust, the frames were
> replaced.
>
> Lyons said no connection exists between the Tacoma and Tundra frames.
>
> The frames were built to a different design and at different plants,
> he said, so this is not apples to apples.
>
> Different plants
>
> Lyons said the Tacoma and Tundra frames were built at different Dana
> plants. He said Toyota does not blame Dana.
>
> Ultimately, this is our vehicle and our responsibility, Lyons said.
>
> He said he does not know the next step, but NHTSA could do an
> engineering analysis of the truck, which is more extensive than the
> preliminary examination.
>
> Toyota already is entangled in high-profile lawsuits involving
> rollovers and faulty steering rods and is facing a huge recall related
> to unintended acceleration.
>
> Lyons said the company has not decided what the fix will be for
> complaints about unintended acceleration in certain Toyota and Lexus
> models. Last month the company sent letters to 3.8 million owners
> urging them to remove the floor mats from their vehicles while the
> company ponders how to fix the problem.

--

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Old 22 Nov 2009, 04:23 pm   #5 (permalink)
C. E. White
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Default Re: Toyota must submit data on rusting Tundras


"Hachiroku ハチ*ク" <Trueno@e86.GTS> wrote in message
newsan.2009.11.20.22.56.52.499154@e86.GTS...
> On Fri, 20 Nov 2009 14:28:14 -0800, Ed White wrote:
>
>> “It is too early to speculate what we will do for Tundra,” Toyota
>> spokesman Brian Lyons said. “They're only looking at one specific
>> portion of the frame -- the cross member that supports the spare tire --
>> not the entire frame.”
>>
>> The frames were manufactured by Dana Corp., which also supplied the
>> frames
>> for the 750,000 Tacoma pickups that suffered similar rust problems and
>> were the subject of voluntary recalls and buybacks last year.

>
>
> Your post blames this on Toyota, but it seems Dana is the culprit, both on
> the Tundra and the Tacoma frame problems.


It is a news article. I am not blaming the rusting frames on anyone.
However, it would be dishonest for Toyota to blame the suuplier. Toyota is
the vehicle manufacturer. Ultimately Toyota is responsible for sepcifying
the materials, rust treatemetns ,and for quailty control. Unless Dana was
commiting some sort of fraud, it is Toyota's problem. If you read the whole
article you will even have seen the following:

"Lyons said the Tacoma and Tundra frames were built at different Dana
plants. He said Toyota does not blame Dana.

"“Ultimately, this is our vehicle and our responsibility,” Lyons said."

Ths was actually a refreshing change fromt he usual Toyota practice of
blaming their screw up on others (suppleirs, Customers, etc.).

Ed

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Old 30 Nov 2009, 09:43 pm   #6 (permalink)
M. Balmer
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Default Re: Toyota must submit data on rusting Tundras

Horseshit. I have seen dodges and frauds pitted and rusted beyond repair
(also seen a shitload of dodges stricken with engine and tranny failures. so
much for amerikan engineering). it happens when ****ing morons pour a known
corrosive on the roads to melt snow. ****ing retards.



"dbu`" <nospam@nobama.com.invalid> wrote in message
news:GKidnXNsHO3gqprWnZ2dnUVZ_jCdnZ2d@giganews.com ...
> In article <4b0722d9$0$6765$ce5e7886@news-radius.ptd.net>,
> "Mike Hunter" <Mikehunt2@lycos,com> wrote:
>
>> Toyotas problem is in the piss poor quality steel they buy from Nippon
>> Steel
>> of Japan. Dana only does the stamping so Toyota can claim the frames as
>> N.A. parts.

>
> Good news here!! I did see three more Tundras in the past week. They
> were not in contractor mode however. One had a cover over the box, I
> forget what they call those things, but it didn't appear to be a work
> type truck to me, perhaps one that's used in going food shopping. The
> other two had nothing in the box, in fact the box looked clean as a
> whistle. In the meantime I've seen numerous, perhaps hundreds of Dodge,
> GMC, Fords pu's hauling all kinds of cargo and pulling various trailers
> with a varying amount of cargo along with that observation some were in
> a rough looking shape varying degrees of course, like you'd see on a
> work site. I might add, some were older trucks, surely not new which
> means they've been around the block a few times.
>
> Contractors don't trade in every year for nice pretty and shiny new
> trucks, they pretty much run them into the ground then buy a new or
> later used basic work truck. Makes sense.
>
> Seems at least here the American PU trucks rule.
>
> Cheers
>
>>
>>
>> "Ed White" <ce.white3@gmail.com> wrote in message
>> news:2de532e3-1805-451c-9824-b77f38df508d@g1g2000vbr.googlegroups.com...
>> Toyota must submit data on rusting Tundras
>> Kathy Jackson
>> Automotive News
>> November 20, 2009 - 1:25 pm ET
>>
>> LOS ANGELES -- Already facing a number of quality-related problems,
>> Toyota Motor Corp. must submit information to the National Highway
>> Traffic Safety Administration today in response to complaints about
>> rusted frames on 2000 and 2001 Toyota Tundra pickups.
>>
>> NHTSA began a preliminary evaluation of the problem Oct. 6 and gave
>> Toyota the Nov. 20 deadline.
>>
>> "It is too early to speculate what we will do for Tundra," Toyota
>> spokesman Brian Lyons said. "They're only looking at one specific
>> portion of the frame -- the cross member that supports the spare tire
>> -- not the entire frame."
>>
>> The frames were manufactured by Dana Corp., which also supplied the
>> frames for the 750,000 Tacoma pickups that suffered similar rust
>> problems and were the subject of voluntary recalls and buybacks last
>> year.
>>
>> Dana spokesman Chuck Hartlage said today that the supplier was helping
>> Toyota with the Tundra investigation.
>>
>> NHTSA is investigating 20 reports that relate to spare-tire separation
>> and brake system failures resulting from severe frame corrosion on the
>> pickups.
>>
>> As of yesterday, the federal agency had received 238 complaints about
>> the 2000 models and 48 about the 2001 models. The complaints range
>> from brake-line corrosion to corrosion of the entire frame. More than
>> 70 complaints had been posted since NHTSA launched its investigation
>> in October.
>>
>> "My mechanic suggested that it was unsafe to drive because the brake
>> line connection points were so corroded that they could fail while in
>> operation," one consumer wrote in his complaint.
>>
>> There have been reports of three injuries but no deaths.
>>
>> Lyons confirmed that Dana supplied the frames. In March 2008, Toyota
>> agreed to buy back 1995-2000 Tacomas at 150 percent of the high-end
>> Kelley Blue Book value.
>>
>> In November 2008, Toyota issued a recall on 2001 to 2004 Tacomas. If
>> no rust had occurred, Toyota automatically extended the warranty to 15
>> years with unlimited mileage. If there was rust, the frames were
>> replaced.
>>
>> Lyons said no connection exists between the Tacoma and Tundra frames.
>>
>> "The frames were built to a different design and at different plants,"
>> he said, "so this is not apples to apples."
>>
>> Different plants
>>
>> Lyons said the Tacoma and Tundra frames were built at different Dana
>> plants. He said Toyota does not blame Dana.
>>
>> "Ultimately, this is our vehicle and our responsibility," Lyons said.
>>
>> He said he does not know the next step, but NHTSA could do an
>> engineering analysis of the truck, which is more extensive than the
>> preliminary examination.
>>
>> Toyota already is entangled in high-profile lawsuits involving
>> rollovers and faulty steering rods and is facing a huge recall related
>> to unintended acceleration.
>>
>> Lyons said the company has not decided what the fix will be for
>> complaints about unintended acceleration in certain Toyota and Lexus
>> models. Last month the company sent letters to 3.8 million owners
>> urging them to remove the floor mats from their vehicles while the
>> company ponders how to fix the problem.

> --
>



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