Howes: Toyota not looking so shiny now

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Old 26 Nov 2009, 12:12 pm   #1 (permalink)
john
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Default Howes: Toyota not looking so shiny now

November 26, 2009
Howes: Toyota not looking so shiny now
DANIEL HOWES

Is the Toyota Motor Corp. juggernaut losing its conqueror-of-the-world
mojo?

Because if it was a Detroit automaker that was recalling 4.26 million
vehicles to repair accelerator problems, or if it was a Detroit
automaker that had broken its historic no-plant-closings pledge, or if
it was a Detroit automaker that had recalled more vehicles (2.38
million) in 2005 than it sold in the United States that year (2.26
million), the answer would be an emphatic yes.

The answer also would be yes if Toyota, an earnings powerhouse,
suddenly stopped minting cash -- notwithstanding the three-month
period ended Sept. 30 -- and was on track to lose billions more this
year. The answer would be yes if its exponential market share gains
suddenly slowed, or if its national rival, Honda Motor Co., kept
delivering profits despite a global auto recession and its new South
Korean rival, Hyundai-Kia, continued to grab precious U.S. market
share.

News flash: The men running Toyota appear to be mortal. They overreach
and make mistakes. Their vehicles are not flawless. Their engineers
cut corners, at least in ways that garner the attention of the
National Highway Traffic Administration. Their Camry no longer is the
undisputed king of midsize cars, now that rivals Ford Motor Co. and
even General Motors Co. are proving they can produce world-class
metal, too.

This isn't new, either, suggesting that Toyota's troubles may be more
of a developing pattern than a one-time aberration. Two years ago,
before two-thirds of Detroit's automakers were tempered by the fires
of bankruptcy, the editor of the ostensibly "Japanese-loving" Consumer
Reports apologized to readers for recommending the problem-plagued
Camry V-6.

He also said the magazine had decided new Toyota models could no
longer be given the benefit of the doubt -- or its prized
"recommended" label. And Toyota's V-8 powered Tundra four-wheel drive
pickup was labeled "unreliable" by the magazine, the unofficial Bible
to discerning car and truck buyers.

Two years before that, the global industry's gold standard for quality
recalled more vehicles in the United States than it sold in the United
States. There have been running customer complaints about sludge in
its engines, and, more recently, growing federal skepticism over
Toyota's response to the unintended acceleration probe.

'Grasping for salvation'

Infallible they aren't, as CEO Akio Toyoda, a scion of the founding
family, conceded last month. Toyota, he said, is nearing "capitulation
to irrelevance or death" and is "grasping for salvation." He also said
the still cash-rich automaker has grown too arrogant on "the hubris
born of success" and the "undisciplined pursuit of more."

Even adjusting for the Japanese cultural proclivity for excessive
apology freighted with humility, those are stunning statements coming
from a Toyota CEO. Considering that his name, save one letter, is on
the proverbial building, the admissions are even more revealing.

Which means what, exactly?

That the Great Recession, the accelerant that pushed GM and Chrysler
Group LLC into bankruptcy and fueled Ford's evident resurgence, also
is rebalancing the automotive landscape in ways that seemed impossible
just a few years ago.

Fresh from federally induced bankruptcy, GM's labor costs are
competitive; its product portfolio is solid; its footprint in
developing markets is impressive; and its debt load is enviably small,
making it a potentially formidable competitor able to generate cash
once the worst of the auto sales depression passes.

Ford arguably is building its best vehicles in a generation, if not a
whole lot longer. The Blue Oval is booking monthly gains in its share
of the U.S. market, an accomplishment seemingly reserved exclusively
for Toyota not too long ago.

And Toyota's position as the undisputed quality leader and industry
juggernaut clearly is in jeopardy. That's change you can believe in.

dchowes@detnews.com">dchowes@detnews.com Daniel Howes' column runs
Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays

Copyright 2009 The Detroit News. All rights reserved.

http://detnews.com/article/20091126/OPINION03/911260331



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Old 26 Nov 2009, 12:38 pm   #2 (permalink)
phaeton
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Default Re: Howes: Toyota not looking so shiny now


> This isn't new, either, suggesting that Toyota's troubles may be more
> of a developing pattern than a one-time aberration. Two years ago,
> before two-thirds of Detroit's automakers were tempered by the fires
> of bankruptcy, the editor of the ostensibly "Japanese-loving" Consumer
> Reports apologized to readers for recommending the problem-plagued
> Camry V-6.
>
> He also said the magazine had decided new Toyota models could no
> longer be given the benefit of the doubt -- or its prized
> "recommended" label. And Toyota's V-8 powered Tundra four-wheel drive
> pickup was labeled "unreliable" by the magazine, the unofficial Bible
> to discerning car and truck buyers.
>
>


I always take everything Consumer Reports says with a grain of salt.
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Old 26 Nov 2009, 01:51 pm   #3 (permalink)
Hachiroku $B%O%A%m%/(B
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Default Re: Howes: Toyota not looking so shiny now

On Thu, 26 Nov 2009 09:12:33 -0800, john wrote:

>
> November 26, 2009
> Howes: Toyota not looking so shiny now DANIEL HOWES
>
> Is the Toyota Motor Corp. juggernaut losing its conqueror-of-the-world
> mojo?
>
> Because if it was a Detroit automaker that was recalling 4.26 million
> vehicles to repair accelerator problems, or if it was a Detroit automaker
> that had broken its historic no-plant-closings pledge, or if it was a
> Detroit automaker that had recalled more vehicles (2.38 million) in 2005
> than it sold in the United States that year (2.26 million), the answer
> would be an emphatic yes.



But we're not dealing with a North American manufacturer that would
correct this mistake, and then make another in next year's model.

We're dealing with a Japanese company where heads will roll for 'losing
face'. And that is now, again, family run. A member of the Toyoda family
has already stepped in and replaced the President of Toyota Motor, who was
asked to step down due to Toyota's recent quality problems, and has
probably already committed Hari Kari.

If we were talking about General Motors, yeah, I could see the speculation
in the article taking place. But we're talking about a Japanese company
that is now interested in 'saving face', regaining their reputation, and
will work hard to do so. General Motors appeased their shareholders by
selling the cheapest product they could get away with for the highest
price they could charge, and it ran them into bankruptcy. Do not expect
the same from Toyota. They make the shareholders happy by making the
*Customers* happy and wanting to buy their cars.

You really don't know a whole lot about this, so please stop posting your
Bullshit in the Toyota group. Thanks.


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Old 26 Nov 2009, 04:10 pm   #4 (permalink)
someone@some.domain
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Default Re: Howes: Toyota not looking so shiny now

In article <d9b14ab6-de86-4e4b-9b0f-b323f98f7409@r5g2000yqb.googlegroups.com>, phaeton <blahbleh666@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>> This isn't new, either, suggesting that Toyota's troubles may be more
>> of a developing pattern than a one-time aberration. Two years ago,
>> before two-thirds of Detroit's automakers were tempered by the fires
>> of bankruptcy, the editor of the ostensibly "Japanese-loving" Consumer
>> Reports apologized to readers for recommending the problem-plagued
>> Camry V-6.
>>
>> He also said the magazine had decided new Toyota models could no
>> longer be given the benefit of the doubt -- or its prized
>> "recommended" label. And Toyota's V-8 powered Tundra four-wheel drive
>> pickup was labeled "unreliable" by the magazine, the unofficial Bible
>> to discerning car and truck buyers.
>>
>>

>
>I always take everything Consumer Reports says with a grain of salt.


yeah, a 50 mile square grain.
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Old 26 Nov 2009, 04:19 pm   #5 (permalink)
in2dadark
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Default Re: Howes: Toyota not looking so shiny now

On Nov 26, 12:12*pm, john <johngd...@hotmail.com> wrote:
> November 26, 2009
> Howes: Toyota not looking so shiny now
> DANIEL HOWES
>
> Is the Toyota Motor Corp. juggernaut losing its conqueror-of-the-world
> mojo?
>
> Because if it was a Detroit automaker that was recalling 4.26 million
> vehicles to repair accelerator problems, or if it was a Detroit
> automaker that had broken its historic no-plant-closings pledge, or if
> it was a Detroit automaker that had recalled more vehicles (2.38
> million) in 2005 than it sold in the United States that year (2.26
> million), the answer would be an emphatic yes.
>
> The answer also would be yes if Toyota, an earnings powerhouse,
> suddenly stopped minting cash -- notwithstanding the three-month
> period ended Sept. 30 -- and was on track to lose billions more this
> year. The answer would be yes if its exponential market share gains
> suddenly slowed, or if its national rival, Honda Motor Co., kept
> delivering profits despite a global auto recession and its new South
> Korean rival, Hyundai-Kia, continued to grab precious U.S. market
> share.
>
> News flash: The men running Toyota appear to be mortal. They overreach
> and make mistakes. Their vehicles are not flawless. Their engineers
> cut corners, at least in ways that garner the attention of the
> National Highway Traffic Administration. Their Camry no longer is the
> undisputed king of midsize cars, now that rivals Ford Motor Co. and
> even General Motors Co. are proving they can produce world-class
> metal, too.
>
> This isn't new, either, suggesting that Toyota's troubles may be more
> of a developing pattern than a one-time aberration. Two years ago,
> before two-thirds of Detroit's automakers were tempered by the fires
> of bankruptcy, the editor of the ostensibly "Japanese-loving" Consumer
> Reports apologized to readers for recommending the problem-plagued
> Camry V-6.
>
> He also said the magazine had decided new Toyota models could no
> longer be given the benefit of the doubt -- or its prized
> "recommended" label. And Toyota's V-8 powered Tundra four-wheel drive
> pickup was labeled "unreliable" by the magazine, the unofficial Bible
> to discerning car and truck buyers.
>
> Two years before that, the global industry's gold standard for quality
> recalled more vehicles in the United States than it sold in the United
> States. There have been running customer complaints about sludge in
> its engines, and, more recently, growing federal skepticism over
> Toyota's response to the unintended acceleration probe.
>
> 'Grasping for salvation'
>
> Infallible they aren't, as CEO Akio Toyoda, a scion of the founding
> family, conceded last month. Toyota, he said, is nearing "capitulation
> to irrelevance or death" and is "grasping for salvation." He also said
> the still cash-rich automaker has grown too arrogant on "the hubris
> born of success" and the "undisciplined pursuit of more."
>
> Even adjusting for the Japanese cultural proclivity for excessive
> apology freighted with humility, those are stunning statements coming
> from a Toyota CEO. Considering that his name, save one letter, is on
> the proverbial building, the admissions are even more revealing.
>
> Which means what, exactly?
>
> That the Great Recession, the accelerant that pushed GM and Chrysler
> Group LLC into bankruptcy and fueled Ford's evident resurgence, also
> is rebalancing the automotive landscape in ways that seemed impossible
> just a few years ago.
>
> Fresh from federally induced bankruptcy, GM's labor costs are
> competitive; its product portfolio is solid; its footprint in
> developing markets is impressive; and its debt load is enviably small,
> making it a potentially formidable competitor able to generate cash
> once the worst of the auto sales depression passes.
>
> Ford arguably is building its best vehicles in a generation, if not a
> whole lot longer. The Blue Oval is booking monthly gains in its share
> of the U.S. market, an accomplishment seemingly reserved exclusively
> for Toyota not too long ago.
>
> And Toyota's position as the undisputed quality leader and industry
> juggernaut clearly is in jeopardy. That's change you can believe in.
>
> dcho...@detnews.com">dcho...@detnews.com Daniel Howes' column runs
> Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays
>
> Copyright 2009 The Detroit News. All rights reserved.
>
> http://detnews.com/article/20091126/OPINION03/911260331


I think toyota's biggest mistake is letting americans go anywhere near
where they build and design cars. American workers screwed up american
cars and, for that matter, America.

I don't have any employees for a reason. My business would be dead in
18 months. I could hire several people and expand my business
exponetially if I wanted. I just have no desire to do so in this
cesspool.

Hopefully toyota will go back to building everything off shore. My J
vin camry won't die in spite of the abuse I put it though.
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Old 26 Nov 2009, 06:05 pm   #6 (permalink)
Elmo P. Shagnasty
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Default Re: Howes: Toyota not looking so shiny now

In article <pan.2009.11.26.18.51.48.986305@e86.GTS>,
Hachiroku ÉnÉ`ÉçÉN <Trueno@e86.GTS> wrote:

> A member of the Toyoda family
> has already stepped in and replaced the President of Toyota Motor, who was
> asked to step down due to Toyota's recent quality problems, and has
> probably already committed Hari Kari.


He's dead.

Maybe you mean harakiri?
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Old 26 Nov 2009, 06:23 pm   #7 (permalink)
Mike Hunter
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Default Re: Howes: Toyota not looking so shiny now

Wasn't he a sports announcer?


"Elmo P. Shagnasty" <elmop@nastydesigns.com> wrote in message
news:elmop-C3DE4D.18052026112009@nothing.attdns.com...
> In article <pan.2009.11.26.18.51.48.986305@e86.GTS>,
> Hachiroku ÉnÉ`ÉçÉN <Trueno@e86.GTS> wrote:
>
>> A member of the Toyoda family
>> has already stepped in and replaced the President of Toyota Motor, who
>> was
>> asked to step down due to Toyota's recent quality problems, and has
>> probably already committed Hari Kari.

>
> He's dead.
>
> Maybe you mean harakiri?



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Old 26 Nov 2009, 06:25 pm   #8 (permalink)
Hachiroku $B%O%A%m%/(B
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Default Re: Howes: Toyota not looking so shiny now

On Thu, 26 Nov 2009 18:05:20 -0500, Elmo P. Shagnasty wrote:

> In article <pan.2009.11.26.18.51.48.986305@e86.GTS>,
> Hachiroku ÉnÉ`ÉçÉN <Trueno@e86.GTS> wrote:
>
>> A member of the Toyoda family
>> has already stepped in and replaced the President of Toyota Motor, who
>> was asked to step down due to Toyota's recent quality problems, and has
>> probably already committed Hari Kari.

>
> He's dead.
>
> Maybe you mean harakiri?


ha⋅ra-ki⋅ri
  /ˈhɑrəˈkɪəri, ˈhærə-, ˈhæri-/ [hahr-uh-keer-ee, har-uh-,
har-ee-] –noun
1. Also called seppuku. ceremonial suicide by ripping open the abdomen
with a dagger or knife: formerly practiced in Japan by members of the
warrior class when disgraced or sentenced to death. 2. suicide or any
suicidal action; a self-destructive act: political hara-kiri.

Also, hari kari.


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Old 26 Nov 2009, 06:32 pm   #9 (permalink)
phaeton
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Default Re: Howes: Toyota not looking so shiny now

On Nov 26, 5:25*pm, Hachiroku ハチ*ク <Tru...@e86.GTS> wrote:
> On Thu, 26 Nov 2009 18:05:20 -0500, Elmo P. Shagnasty wrote:
> > In article <pan.2009.11.26.18.51.48.986...@e86.GTS>,
> > *Hachiroku ÉnÉ`ÉçÉN <Tru...@e86.GTS> wrote:

>
> >> A member of the Toyoda family
> >> has already stepped in and replaced the President of Toyota Motor, who
> >> was asked to step down due to Toyota's recent quality problems, and has
> >> probably already committed Hari Kari.

>
> > He's dead.

>
> > Maybe you mean harakiri?

>
> ha⋅ra-ki⋅ri
>   /ˈhɑrəˈkɪəri, ˈhærə-, ˈhæri-/ *[hahr-uh-keer-ee, har-uh-,
> har-ee-] –noun
> 1. * * *Also called seppuku. ceremonial suicide by rippingopen the abdomen
> with a dagger or knife: formerly practiced in Japan by members of the
> warrior class when disgraced or sentenced to death. 2. *suicide or any
> suicidal action; a self-destructive act: political hara-kiri.
>
> Also, hari kari.


Seppuku Chicken is one of my fave dishes.
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Old 26 Nov 2009, 06:47 pm   #10 (permalink)
someone@some.domain
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Default Re: Howes: Toyota not looking so shiny now

In article <elmop-C3DE4D.18052026112009@nothing.attdns.com>, "Elmo P. Shagnasty" <elmop@nastydesigns.com> wrote:
>In article <pan.2009.11.26.18.51.48.986305@e86.GTS>,
> Hachiroku ÉnÉ`ÉçÉN <Trueno@e86.GTS> wrote:
>
>> A member of the Toyoda family
>> has already stepped in and replaced the President of Toyota Motor, who was
>> asked to step down due to Toyota's recent quality problems, and has
>> probably already committed Hari Kari.

>
>He's dead.
>
>Maybe you mean harakiri?

seppeku is the correct name.
the other is stupid slang.
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